The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on November 15, 1960 · Page 9
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 9

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, November 15, 1960
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Page 9
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November 15, 1960 November 15, 1960 40th Anniversary For Carl Raths Mr and Mrs Carl Ralh nl Armstrong 'formerly of Lorn; Hock and Swea City will he honored nl ii Kmiielh Wedding Anniversary witli open House from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 2f)lh. al the all purpose Room Armstrong school. Children of the couple are .sponsoring the reception. All friends and relatives are invited to call. No special invitations will be sent. Manufacturing is an important industry in California. WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 23 ALGONA TOOAY-J YOUfM lUMMNO WITH AMMIMOTIONS ...CAUGHT IN kCtOSS-FMEOFLOVi Mil DOORS OPEN AT 10:30 - ALL SEATS 75c ALGONA FRI. And SAT. - 2 BIG FEATURES | AFRICA CMKMMCQKMM.CWM Anthony NEWLEY-Anne AUBREY. a~;,IN COLOR 2ND THRILLING FEATURE TONIGHT I HAVE A HANGOVER. It's a non-alchoholic one to be sure, but a hangover nontheless and it was caused by election day. We worked 25 hours nl first ward polls, and although I had a good night's rest last night, previously there were 36 hours in which I had but one hour of sleep! ELECTION DAY IS ALWAYS IMPORTANT. Not only do we have a chance to go to the polls and express our opinion by our vote, we also have a chance to see our neighbors. That's why I like working as an election official. This year we were so busy we had absolutely no time to.sit and chat and I didn't get any dish towels hemmed. Usually, I take a bunch and Hortense Ferguson takes pity on my awkward fingers and hems up the towels for me. This year, with i'l'M't people voting in our ward, we had to tend strictly to business. * * * # IT OCCURRED TO ME, as the long lines of fellow-citi/.ens filed by, that the people at any polls represent a good cross-section of America. We got very little chance to visit with any of them, but being real nosy, about people, I enjoyed seeing so many of them. * + * 0 WHEN THE POLLS OPENED THERE WERE eight or ten people waiting to vote. It was that way all day, and a few times there were people lined clear down the high school corridor waiting the chance to exercise the franchise. Doc Janse was in, tall, lean and handsome, but somehow unfamiliar looking without his usual escort of two or three dogs. Doc was back a few minutes later to see if he'd left his reading glasses in the booth. He hadn't; he found them in his hip pocket and he came in for a little kidding by the 30 PRIZES! MARKTWAIN'S "THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY; FINN" COLORING CONTEST JACQUES BERIM SEE THE TORTURER ! SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:00 "KILLERS OF KILIMANJARO" PLUS 6 COLOR CARTOONS TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY CARY GINGER CHARLES MARILYN I GRANT ROGERS COBURN MONROE I PLUS SECOND FEATURE ADM. 75c - 25c KIDDIES - ENTER MARK TWAIN'S "THE HUCKLEBERRY FINN" COLORING CONTEST ADVENTURES OF 30 BIG PRIZES ! MARK TWAIN'S "THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN" STARTS THURSDAY, NOV. 24, THROUGH SATURDAY, NOV. 26, AT THE ALGONA THEATRE. RULES: Contestants may submit entries in water colors, crayons, chalks, pastels or inks. Winners will be judged on originality and neatness. Clip the above outline drawing and color it as y°u think best. Mail or bring your entries to the ALGONA THEATRE on or before midnight, Monday, Nov. 21. Prizes in two groups, (1) ages up to 8, (2) ages 9 through 12. PRIZES FOR EACH GROUP: First prize, free pass to ALGONA THEATER good for three months. Second prize, free pass to ALGONA THEATER good for two months. Third prize, free pass to ALGONA THEATER good for one month. 12 free passes to see Mark Twain's "T.he Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" Starting Nov. 24. AFTER COLORING ABOVE PICTURE, FILL IN LINES BELOW AND BRING OR MAIL TO ALGONA THEATER. Your Name Your Age __ . , Your Addrest .— Winners will be announced in the Algona Upper Des Moines Nov. DON'T MISS ITI MARK TWAIN'S "THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN" High Rating In Merit Test To Ruth Ann Klein Reverend F. P. Conway, Superintendent of Garrigan High School, has announced that Ruth Ann Klein, senior at Garrigan High School has been honored lor outstanding performance in the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT) given last spring. Each student who is endorsed by his school receives a formal letter of Commendation Scholarship Corporation. John M. Stalnaker, ^president of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation stated: "While these bright youngsters did not reach the status of semifinalists in the 19GO-G1 Merit Program, they are so outstanding that we wish to single them out for special attention. The semifinalists and commended students together constitute less than three per cent of all high school seniors, and this certainly signifies noteworthy achievement." Ruth Ann Klein is the daughter of Mr and Mrs Alvin F. Klein, Irvinglon. Six certificates of Education Development have been awarded to sophomores and juniors at Garrigan High School for their placement in the top quarter in the National Educational Development Test. They are: Juniors; Vernell Ludwig, Mary Reilly and Daniel Glaser. Sophomores; Mary Lou Gales, Lois Erpelding and Jeanne Nelson. Give Oct. D.H.I.A. Herd Records Twenty four herds were tested on regular D. H. I. A. with .436 cows in milk and 29 herds were tested on owner-sampler during October, according to Forrest hoard. Doc has heen practicing medicine fur about GO years and heaven knows how many babies he has delivered. What a featuro story he'd make. I thought, and I mean to <;<•! OIK- from him if he'll hold still for it. * * * * HAZEL MILLER, WEARING A LOVELY red, plaid coat, and her husband. Ralph were in. I found out fur the I'iist tinv that, Ha/el's middle name is the same as mine — Grace. Mike McKoioe cast his ballot with assTstance because of his eyesight., Me wa:? Democratic chairman for many years and he hasn't losl his interest in politics. j ***** SEVERAL PEOPLE BROUGHT THEIR youngsters to the polls and even though the kids couldn't vote, they seemed fascinated by the proceedure. My next door neighbor, Jeff Grimm was there with hi.-: dad, his remarkably blue eyes wide open with interest. I shamelessly eavesdrop on the three little Grimms from my window over the dishwashing sink, and they are darlings. Jeff, a . kindergarten pupil, occasionally does painting on the back stoop. He has a special pair of blue jeans reserved for painting and he spreads out his cars and trucks on newspapers and gives them a new coat of red. A more meticulous workman does not exist! « * * * CLARENCE MAWDSLEY VOTED on crutches this year due to a broken ankle. Their grandson. Craig was with them and he wailed with Grandpa while Grandma voted and vice-versa. When W. C. Dewel came in, I accused him of already voting by absentee ballot. We'd had one come in with the name, William C. Dewel on it. but we found it svas Grandson Bill, away at school. , « * * * THERE WERE EIGHTY SOME people in our ward voting by absentee ballot. The voles came in from all over the world. Sandra Shumway cast her ballot from England where she is attending Oxford. If I'm not mistaken, she's a first-time voter. Boh ChriPtensen's ballot came from Turkey where he is in service. Julia and Kirk Hayes voted from Japan and their parents. Mr and Mrs John Hayes voted absentee, also. They are visiting the younger couple in Tokyo. Ella Thompson, who has always come in to cast her ballot at first ward, sent hers in this time absentee because she's now at Friendship Haven at Fort Dodge. Mrs Anna McQunde didn't miss voting, either. She s 9(5 and a resident of Good Samaritan. •'f <!: * * MRS PAUL OWENS REPORTED that her four year old twins were mighty ornery that day, taut 1 didn't really believe her. Zaida ^Jaudian. ;. fellow worker, and the Owen's next door neighbor, had List been telling me how nice they are. George and Berniee Cook came in( 20 and 10 pounds lighter, respectively, because of concern ibout their five year old Doug who had heart surgery at Iowa City •ecently. Doug's not home yet. but after a narrow squeak, things appear to be all right with him. Mrs Fred Corey, now again a resident of Algona, was in to vote, looking very dashing in a purple hat over her while hair. She's my beloved "Mamma" Corey of younger years. * * * * WHEN LORENE JOHNSON CAME IN to vote, I was reminded how nothing ever stopped her late husband, Cliff, from casting his ballot in every election. Mrs Johnson is carrying on the tradition and she's now flanked by daughter, Maxine and son, Larry, who have reached voting age. Dorothy Barkema cost her ballot and somebody remarked she didn't look old enough to vote. But she's teaching in the Algona schools for not her first, but her second year. * 15 * * I GOOFED FOR THE SECOND TIME on the same subject this year. When I went home for supper, I was supposed to phone Bill Geering to come after his wife, Amy. I forgot it as •! did during the June primaries, but Amy was still speaking to me when we left the polls at mid-morning Wednesday. We'd been working in the room where Mrs Marguerite Kahlers class meets for English and the kids were arriving before we were quite finished. So we went back to the Home EC kitchen where the counting board had worked. There Mrs Charlotte Collier surprised us with hot coffee and doughnuts. Nothing ever tasted so good! * * # # WHEN WE DELIVERED THE BALLOTS TO THE courthouse, I found son, Bill still working on the Associated and United Press reports he had been doing for. me. He, too, had been up all night and he was a little miffed that his Mom's ward was one of the last to come , in. Milton Norton, an unsuccessful candidate, showed as nice a spirit of gallantry as I've seen as he congratulated his opponent on her victory. He said he'd had a lot of fun campaigning and had met lots of nice people. Mrs Walker was most gracious accepting the congratulations. I went home and tried to sleep but I found I was much too keyed up. The girls had taken good care of the house, there were no emergencies, and I was slap-happy but wide awake. . * * * * — I LIKE LIVING IN ALGONA. It's a small town, but friendly. I've never stopped to analyze this affection very much, but after election day, I've come to the conclusion that it's because of the nice people. And they live all over town, not just in first ward! "The Day Of Triumph" Thursday 1:00-3:00-7:00-9:00 "Killers Of Kilimajaro" "The Hypnotic, Eye" Friday-Saturday "Killers.Of Kilimajaro' 7:00-10:00 "The Hypnotic Eye 8:40 Saturday matinee Cartoons at 2:00 "Killers Of Kilimajaro 2:45 "The House Of Usher" Sunday 1:40-3:45-5:40-7:35-9:25 Monday 7:35-9:30 "Monkey Business" "Crimson Kimona" Tuesday-Wed. "Monkey Business' 7:00-10:00 "Crimson Kimona" 8:35 Wednesday Midnight Show "High School Big Shot" 11:45 "T Bird Gang" 12:40 THIS WEEK'S RECIPE IS for Potato Chip Cookies. 1 cup shortening 1 cup white sugar 1 cup brown sugar 2 cups crushed potato chips 2 eggs 1 cup chopped nuts 2 cups sifted flour 1 teasp. soda 1 teasp. salt Cream shortening and sugar; add eggs and mix well. Mix flour, salt and soda and add to batter. Last, add crushed chips and nuts. Shape into small balls. Press clown on ungreased cookie sheet with floured fork. Bake at 325 degrees for 10 minutes. —GRACE. Hofbauer. Swea City, D. H. I. A. supervisor. Six herds averaged over 35 Ibs. of butterfat per cow for the month. They were owned by Ralph Walkqr, Jr., Ed Tigges, John Ruger, Leander Menke, Laurence Loeschen, and Frank & John Droessler. Lactation records reported as complete that butterfat were 400 Ibs.. of per cow were in the herds of Walter Campney & Son, Ed Tigges (5), Alvin Boettcher, Harry Bartelt, Donald Hofbauer, Herman Soderbeg (2), George Wallentine, Sidney Payne (2), Harvey Work Farm (2), and John Ruger (4). SUN. And WON. ALGONA CONTINUOUS SUN. FROM 1 P. M. He had buried hen alive in the tomb,., and now she haunts him with* shrieking madness! AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL THE UNCODLY...THE EVIL roe's **, VINCENT PRICE Mark Uamon — Myrna Faney UPjPPPf"'- v^mV-' ' *•>„. T^ *. < •*„ HL »tV Adm. 75c — 25c

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