The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on August 16, 1960 · Page 17
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 17

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, August 16, 1960
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Page 17
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^;i«6O;1OWA^ ^ $$>. EXfOSITIpN... WORLD HEREFORD coNliRiNCE SHOW Once-lrt.fl.lUetlnie event. ; i NATIONAL LIVESTOCK SHOW % 10,000 magnificent farm onimalii -4H'.WA MIR." A huge farirt $how In Itielf. CARCASS SHOW The newest in Ilv«»t6ek judging. < MAMMOTH MACHINERY New iHattilnet from leading manufacturer*. BIG CAR RACES Afternoons, Aug. 26; Sejt. 1; Sept. 3 Speedway • type can, leading speed demons in hub-to-hub battUs. TZfUtf.* FIRST TIME AT THE STATE FAIRI SUPER-MODIFIED RACES Afternoon, Sept. 4. Unlimited modi* Jieds, super-powered wljjnuper «n« ginei. GO CART RACES Afternoon, Aug. 26. Newest in racing thrills. EXHIBITS OPEN 'TIL 9 P.M. See all major exhibits after work or after school. STATE TALENT CHAMPIONSHIPS Daily In the cool, restful plaza. FREE SHOW Famed hippodrome acts twice dally in the plaza. , * * * * *'-*'* * AUG. 16 STAR'Sf fl| MUStfS&i, 7NITES ; Aug.27-Sept.2 BiJ, beautiful revue wtfh comedy, music, Marilyn Mann daneers,fomous jSMp; Brothers and other jreat: acts, lavish production numbers ... all headlined by th« brightest start lit the show world. < AU6. 27-28.29 f •? PRESENTING '• Jane Morgan] The fascination Gin Special Guest Star! Johnny; Carsori AUG. 30-31 :':•[. ! ; PRIStNTINO ': Molly Bttev ! Capitol Recording Artist Johnny Cash with Gordon Terrf SEPT. 1-2 ,v PRESENTING /' The Vagabond^. with their newest discovery Babe Pier ' \ The Chordettes < Cadence Recording Artists THRILL-CIRCUS Nite, Aug. 26 - Wild, wooly thrill pfus camel races, ostrich HORSE RACES ' •Afternoons, Aug. 30-31. Speeding thorobreds In the year's biggest harness classics . in Iowa. THRILL SHOWS Afternoon, Aug. 29; Nite, Sept. 3 Smashes, crashes, collisions, precision driving at breakneck speeds PLUS... Better Living Show; Wild* life Exhibit; Miracle Midway; Nightly Fireworks; Art Exhibit; Photo Salon; Horse Show; National Shetland Pony Show; Contests Galore; Free Camp. thow races, circus dels. JALOPY RACES Afternoon, Sept. 2 - High-powered hot rods in scorching battles. , STOCK CAR RACES Afternoon, Aug. 27; Nite, Sept. 4. Late model stocks, top drivers. A"* out speed for big money. "4-" ORDER RESERVE? + *• SEATS NOW! ^ Reserved seats, $2; box seats, $2.50, No reserved or box seats for Cart Races. Send money order, state day & event desired. FUN - . . and GO" QUIZ-INFORMATION In case anybody should ask: the word "cereal" came from Ceres, Roman goddess of agriculture. Ceres would consider this a divine idea: Crush cornflakes between two folds of waxed paper; use them instead of bread crumbs a-top your next casserole. Dot with butter, sprinkle with gra,ted cheese, if you like. ' SKIP STORMS Cut up your old clothesline for jump- ropes! "Go : modern" with gas clothes dryer, before another Summer storm spoils washday. Year around, day or night, wash without a weather-worry. A gas clothes dryer doesn't demand watching, toting or fretting! Today's dryers wear dials; every type of fabric can be dried at proper heat and gentjeness. Gentle hint! Your local gas com' pany pr neighborhood gqs appliance dealer displays them. CHAD IDEA Praise the long the cut long- stem m e d glories, in a tall, vase before the hearth. As lower blopms fade, I clip them off, shorten stems and move flowers to a silver pitcher on the coffee table. Two days later, sterns and blooms shorten again; i-emajniug wray moves to my brass teapot- kast, fajr-from- least, top blossoms a™ plucked off j floated in ft low CUES FOR COLLEGE Getting Daughter's college wardrobe ready? 'These Even the ""bulky" sweater can be washed at home with new cold-water soaps especially made for woolens. Knit dresses, however, retain better hemlines and silhouettes if they're dry-cleaned. Can velveteens and jerseys be laundered? Mind the manufacturer's labeled comments. Or test first, by cuttipg a piece from an inside seam. Launder it; dry it. Like it? Then do the garment. '• CORNED-BEEF CASSEROLE I'm for quick- fix casseroles, to bake while I'm out of the kitchen! So is Mrs. Willard M. Sebrant, Minneapolis, Minn. Here's he* favorite: 'Cook one 8-oz. package spaghetti till tender. Simmer y 9 cup diced onion in l fa cup butter. Combine with 1 can Cream of Mushroom soup and one can milk, 1 small can mushrooms (juice and' all), 1 can corned beef, crumbled, plus blanched spaghetti. Mix lightly; fold in ft lb. grated cheese. Place in buttered casserole. Sprinkle 1 cup buttered bread crumbs on top. Bake one hour in 350-degree gas oven. SUPER.SCRUB Timely word from Mru. Robert Steig of Nevada, Iowa: Potatoes, carrots, radishes and other fresh vegetables "come clean" in a jiffy, if you scrub Mem with, a plastic scourer, ; PIPINP PLPASURE Ancient Chinese piped natural gas through bamboo. Americans, as recently se 1870, piped it through white pine logs and thought.26 • miles a tremendous piping distance! Today, Northern Natural (Jas Cpmpgny yse,s eteel pipeline's toi fomsport gas hundred? of miles to your town, *»» ysu* local gas company, whp pipes it to you.' Steel pipelines go over rivers, underground, through, tolls and mountains ~ to pipe " , tJ is very difficult tot mfe ib toncentrate this, week, I nave had : sati,' hews Shd my ftearrtr is hdflviv 1 have lost- one' oil: deareit' and oldest frioMs, Rkney* whom 1 have known- v»^ childhofldi All these. years She has : been 1 so kind, thougntful jnd : uhderstiindihg, and in my "lOffbW- at losing 'my mother, she Ms a great comfort. 1 think I lave ; never khown a couple so dM * and thoughtful. of t'rieir 'jiefids fis Ruth and her husband, Sleh," 1 could "add much to this, out ftuth wotudnH Want me to. What- has,been between us has be^rP wonderful, and I shall miss ber rfior£ than words can tell. •Mr4 Glenn Sfrayer likes io "get BV/ay from it all.'' She has fecentr ly 'returned from a solitary Wishing trip at ; tittle Spirit .Lake ,and said she enjoyed every? ntbmeht of'it.' i have heard Mfs, :l^dla jLadendorff say siie tb6';' iMdj, fishing and; solitude 1 as a nerVe re'laxer.'. : ' . ; .','%, ', * * .; * : ' '.. '.; j Mrs. "Bud"- Robinson said ihey used 52 do?en buns in the hamburgers served ,at their ' recent opening. She didn't know, .how rnany pounds of meat was consumed, but there was a huge amount of coffee, doughnuts and cookies used. Ella Thompson has settled at Friendship Haven, Fort Dodge, and Jikes it very much. She sees Charlotte Sweeney Sedgwick and Mrs." Laura Smith often, and being with friends helps greatly ,,.., .,»..<». * Like the'man who, when lie saw a giraffe said, "There ain't no such town as Loogootee" but there is-and it is in Indiana, old home town of Adrian Sterling. The Sterlings were recently visited by Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Tippet, Kamrar. Clyde and Adrian were classmates at Loogootee. And small world, Mrs; Tippet's mother went to school with Fern Fpster. Older Algbnans will remember Marie" Horberg and Morton Peterson. They became "Mr. and Mrs." and to them were born four sons, Arnie, deceased, Roland and Richard, Denver, Colo., and Kenneth, Richmond, Va. ; Kenneth and his wife were here recently and called on friends Arnie married .Laura Smith and was 1 killed in an airplane crash while on a test flight, in .World War 2. Marie: diea a few years ago. Morton lives in. ; Denver Kenneth and his wife had a nice- visit with Mr.'and, Mrs,^ndr|w, tTnnc«Al-l ' ' ' ; Mrs. Paul Hlibetl, ^ my itefn ort ground < ; eherpies, phoned me to; giyfe ,;me : tn§ ; |iaa idings she; Is going .W caft some '6r me. ]Ble|s ybu, ' . Mr, and Mis. MervSn son, Los Angeles, called dh Mrs. Fred Geigel One day last-iWeeK, in spite • of His , having >been thirty-nine years since the| J?ad seen, e^ch pther, after a brief t>ause gave the right- afts. liamson family will be ;, Well* remembered; an4 tne; sister /ptne] Was art ', accomplished ,; ^ifenjst. Ethel married and lived in Btts- ton, Mass. She died two years ago. Mervln served iri World ,War I in France; In 1921 he vnidyld to Los Angeles ; and is -a* con tfaci* tor. Bis. wife is the former, Anna Nelson, Swea City. At io'ne 'time she? was employed in the c0urt hotisie; fhe, couple had been •• t* an : - extensive trjp to Floridff Washington, D.C., New ; :York City, Chicago, .and from';., hert went } to Minneapolis, and home. ' ' Hansen. For a second tfme the 6iaiud6 Samson's parakeet, Dickie, has decided to explore the big, y/on- derfur world. The first time he was found and , brought homer, apparently glad to get back Witl\ his family. This time he has been gone so long he has probably .ost his way. * * * When I mentioned the Heise family I knew there was one 1 had omitted. It came to me sud-. denly the other day .- Emma Friends of Linda Heise Potter will be glad to know she is recovering nicely from eye sur : gery at Rochester, Minn., net- formed recently and is again at .home in Storm Lake. * * • * . •" • ' News of 1924-Weather burep- reports coldest summer in , 22 years. George Free and family returned from trip to northern Minnesota. Col. Spencer ami family, spent several weeks IP Wisconsin 'at Yellow Lake. * * » )' When Mr. and Mrs. Don Sjogren and family were on their recent vacation they traveled in parts of Wisconsin and were in Rock county, near Watertown birthplace and boyhood home o: grandpa Gus Sjogren. Gus has been in Iowa so long it seems hard to believe ne ever liveo anywhere, else. * t,\, -'Mrs J -Richard 'xiiroen says Jbj| 'drawer her husband keeps his shooting medals and trophies in is so full it just bulges. I said if he wore the medals he'd probably topple over forward. He returned Saturday from Camp Perry, Ohio, where he had been since.July. 26 attending the national shoot of the National Ride Association. He also attended a small arms school. <(Mi-gosh! He came home with two more medals.) * * * Another birthday to add to the August 4 list-Mrs. Mary Steinman who was 83. She became a resident at G. S. a few weeks ago. "Boss", take .notice. Hurray for vanquished gremlins! Give Reports On High Herd TestsOf July Twenty-five herds were tested with 525 cou>$ 'on -test during July, according to Forrest Hofbauer, Swea City, north unit supervisor, . Lactations over 400 lb. of butterfat were in herds owned by: " Walter Campney, Ed Tigges, Alvin Boettchei (5), Herman Soderberg (3), Ralph Walker, Jr., and Milton Madison. Herds averaging over 40 lb, of butterfat pet' cow for July were those of: Ralph Walker, Jr., Swea City; Laurence Loeschen, Woden, Ralph Angle & Engstrom, Swea tity; and Lewider Menke, Swea City. The Dairy Herd Improvement Association of Kossuth Unit I has just* completed the official test year of 1960, Twelve herds were on test the entire year, while six herds are new and have been in the association Only a part of he year, Of those testing all year the our highest producing herds were Alfred Meyer, Whittemore; Kermit Kuecker, West Bend; Gonrad Schmidt, Ottos.en; and floyd Bode, Algc/na; • this, highest producing individual cows were owned by Alfred Meyer, Floyd. Bode, Kermit Kuecker, Conrad Schmidt and Jim Schmidt, j Union Alethecms Union Aletheans met Aug. 6 at the home of Linda Dodds with tois Hunt assisting. Marjoric 1-Ioldren and Susan Nitchals gave: reports.- Preparations were made for the fair, Madonna Erpelding gave a talk and Janet Erpelding and Linda Dodds gave a demonstration. Guest mother was Mrs. j?eter Erpelding. Our local achievement night was held Aug. 2. judges were Mrs. Henry Loof! and Mrs. Ralph Thompson, In the junior, Trudy Alt, in the senior, Susan Nitchals, received honors, Our demonstration team was Trudy Alt and Janet Angle Held Open House Lakpia — The children of Mr. and Mrs* Herbert Patterson honored their parents in observance of their 40th wedding anniversary, August 7 at an open house from 2 to 5 p.m. in the Methodist church parlors at Buffalo Center. The children are Mr. and Mrs. William Moore (Lavon); Ehnu Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. Warren ferones (Maxine), Swea City Mr and Mrs. Percy McDowell (Marion), Ft. Dodge; Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Patterson, Jr., Rochester, Minn.; and Mr and Mrs. Tuesday, Aug. 16-J^^ Alganajlo.) Upper DCS Ronald Richardson (Margie), La- nia uij\g projects w«f<) discussed* kota. 1 Lunch was .served by the hostcssi ^__ ^ a Benjamin Franklin once said,"Doing an injury puts you Wesley Boys 4-H The Wesley Boys 4-H Cltih X ill TT Ur*lt J tJ\jjr n i * * .... • ... . . -.- en- - - -i- - *• i - M net at the Joseph Skow liuinr your enemy; revenging one. Aiitr 1 Plans were made for makes you but even with mm ft B ' ' ' - - one sets you- - 1 taking projects to the fair nnrl for the booth at the fair. Mowy him." Find it fast In the YELLOW PAGES (ofyour phone book Northern Natural Gfl* Company, Qn>»ha< Gigantic Exhibits of Cattle, Horses, Swine, Sheep and Poultry. Biggest in History. Other Main Features arei • 80-Acre Farm Machinery 9 Home Appliance Shows. • Thrilling Night Show, 10 Mites, Closing witlufior- * geouf Flreworkt. • Auto Races All 10 Days- 4, Speedway Type Cars; 5, Late Stock Cars; Midgets, 1. Thrill Show Supplements Racing, Aug. 28 & Sept. 2. « 2,500 4-H Clubbers In State-wide Contests and Daily Demonstrations. • Huge Farm Crops, Flower, Fruit & Vegetable Shews. • 7 Nite Hone Shows, Aug. 28 thru Sept. 2 & Sept. 4; Me*!*** i Avg- 27 and 28; and Sept. 2, 4 and 5. • Dairy, Bees, Art, Women's, School and State Exhibits. • Royal American Shows on World's Largest Midway. • Buy R««rv»d IttMi by Mail., Grqndilvnd, $2 & S2-SO (fxctpt Sunday Aflernopnj, $2.50 & $3; and labor Day Afternoon, $3 $ $3.50). Horn Show, SI. 50 4 S3. Send Check or Money Order io Minnesota Sla»e fair.,51. faui 13, 1940 Oultidt Colt Admifiionit ^Adults, SOt, Mof, 75f, * 10% MORE PARKING SPACE I r"o"tloned a trip Hazel and Frank Vera, Elmer and Ruth Phillips and Lizzie Post had been on, I didn't know Lizzie's grandsons Rickie and Rex had been alone;. It is reported the kids really pulled 'em in and are as fond of fishi-i^ as grandma and that is SOME fond. I was with fizzle when she bought a cute rod for one of the youngsters. The other was already equipped. See the Chevy Mystery Show In color Sundays, NBC-tV Hiese trails would shake the cab off an ordinary track...but notourChevy" Few trucks are subjected to the body-wracking beatings that are part of a- day's work for this Chevrolet Series 60 pitlpwood hauler. It's owned by J. E. Fox, North Carolina logging contractor. As Bobby Fox, a partner in\ the business says, "Loaded with pulpwood, we drive over stumps 1 and potholes you'd think would ". ijjatf.iljlpttritck to'pieces. These trails would shake the cab off an ordinary truck, but not our Chevy. We can average an extra load a day . .. make $45 to $50 a day more with this Chevy than we can with the others." In every weight class these Chevies- arc doing more work at less expense tlnin trucks have ever done before. Drive one at your Chevrolet dealer's. It's an experience that could pay you big dividends. "That 6-cyliiiflcr engine rcalbj performs," sftf/s Dabby l'i>x. "It's got tlip liiKKiiiK iiowcr we need in the woods and walks right along with a full load on the highway." WORTH MORE BECAUSE THEY WORK MORE! CHEVROLET SIURDIBILTTRUCKS Trade now during yvwr local author&ed Chevrolet dealer's Truck Value Roundup! KOSSUTH MOTOR 108 SOUTH HALL ALGONA, IOWA CY 4-3554 Botsford TO ATTEND THE KOSSUTH COUNTY FAIR August 16, 17, 13 & 19 - Tuej., Wed., Thu.-s. & Fri. Wg WISH TO EXPRESS OUR CONGRATULATIONS TO EACH MEMBER, AND UJAPER OF THE YOUTH Gv OU;i CQ'Jf ITY. Tir.5 ANNUAL SHOWING OF THE MANY WC^TH'VHSU- PROJCC15 IN FRIENDLY COMPETITION AMONG THS YOUTH OP KOSSUTH COUNTY, DEMONSTRATES CLEARLY TO THE PUSLiC, THE SPLENDID TRAINING GIVEN IN 4-H AND F! : A WORK. SHOWN AT THE FAIR !S THE BEST LIVESTOCK THAT IS FED AND PRODUCED IN OUR COUNTY. BOTH INDIVIDUAL AND CLUB PROJECTS ARE SHOWN, AND AWARDS A«£ GiViN TOR THESE ACHIEVEMENTS. THE FAIR ALSO PROViPES TOR A GOOD YSMC V/iTM ITS RIDES, CONCESSIONS, ENTES^TAINMENT AWD EDUCATIONAL DIS- PLAYS. ENJOY THE FAIR, BUT LOOK TO IB TOR BUILDSMO MATERIALS & S££V:CES Phone CY 4-2619 - Sheridan A. Ccok, Manager A'.gona, Iowa

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