The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 14, 1960 · Page 24
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 24

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, June 14, 1960
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Page 24
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for SUKS MID WOOIENS for DRIP-DRY GARMENTS push the no-spin switch for COTTOMS, LINENS, DENIMS and other " FABRICS push all switches UP use cycle" indicoted on master dial Special Switch for COLD Wash and COLD Rinse I our jelly shelf holds many secrets, filled as it is with jars of jam and glasses of jelly, bearing the trade-mark of your own ingenuity. For as the years pass, each of us injects new ideas into basic recipes in an effort to achieve, spreads with exciting new flavors. Actually, every jelly shelf needs "spicing up" from time to time, and until you've tried it, you've no idea what a bit of spice will do. Take a good old- fashioned rhubarb conserve, and try adding some preserved ginger, seeded raisins, a few chopped almonds, grated lemon and orange rind and you've a Spiced Rhubarb Conserve with a zesty new flavor. Blueberry Jam can be spiced up in much the same way, simply by adding lemon juice and a few spices .. . And when it comes to Peach Jam, some finely slivered candied ginger will add a tang to the spread. Again, the secret to a new spread may be hidden in an unusual combination of fruits, as in a jelly made with ripe sour cherries and gooseberries, where the two fruits complement each other, or through combining cherries and raspberries in a jam. There are certain unusual jellies which may be your specialty. One such jelly starring red currants with honey is. Bar-Le-Duc Jelly. My own recipe is simple: BAR-LE-DUC JELLY 4 cups red currants 4 cups cane sugar U cup extracted honey Wash and stem currants before measuring. Drain well. Add sugar and honey and let stand overnight. Next day, heat slowly to boiling, stirring, then boil rapidly 15 to 25 minutes until jelly sheets off spoon. Seal in hot, sterilized small jars. Makes about 2 pints. As fruits ripen from early spring through late autumn, we have our work cut out, filling our cupboards with jellies, jams, preserves and conserves — spreads with exciting flavors bearing the mark of our own ingenuity. SPICED RHUBARB CONSERVE Yield: about 10 medium glasses (5 Ibs. conserve) 6 cups prepared rhubarb 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind (about 2 Ibs. rhubarb) . 1 teaspoon grated orange rtnd 1 cun water 5 cups (2ti Ibs.) granulated sugar , 2 lablespoons finely chopped 1 cup (X lb.) firmly packed dark brown preserved Ringer sugar 1 cup seeded raisins 1 box powdered frutt pectin .% cup finely chopped almonds . First prepare the fruit. Wash 2 pounds rhubarb and slice very fine or chop. Measure 6 cups into a very large saucepan. Add water, ginger, raisins, almonds, lemon rind, and orange rind. Then make the conserve. Measure sugars and set aside. Add pectin to fruit mixture in saucepan and mix well. Place over high heat and stir until mixture comes to a hard boil. At once stir in sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off foam with metal spoon. Then stir and skim by turns for 5 minutes to cool slightly, to prevent floating fruit. Ladle quickly into glasses. Cover at once with X inch hot paraffin. , prepare the fruit, Crush thoroughly 1)1 quarts fully ripe blueberries. Measure 4X cup* into a very targe saucepan. Squeeze the juice from 1 medium-sized lemon and measure 2 tablespoons into saucepan with blueberries, f ' Then make the jam. .Add sugar to fruit in saucepan and mix well. Add K to X teaspoon each cloves, cinnamon, and allspice, or any desired combination of spices to berries before cooking. Place over high heat, bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and at once stir in liquid fruit pectin, Skim off foam with metal spoon. Then stir and skim by .turns'for 5 minutes to cool slightly, to prevent floating fruit. Ladle quickly into glasses. Cover jam at once with X inch hot paraffin. CHERRY AND RASPBERRY JAM (Using sour cherries) Yield: about 7 medium glasses (3X Ibs. jam) 3£ cups prepared fruit (about 1 lb.) ripe sour cherries and 1 qt. ripe red raspberries 4% cups (2 Ibs.) sugar 1 box (2% oz.) powdered fruit pectin First, prepare the fruit. Stem and pit about 1 pound fully ripe sour cherries and chop one. Crush thoroughly about 1 quart fully ripe red raspberries. Combine fruits and measure 3Ji cups into a large saucepan. Then make the jam. Measure sugar and set aside. Add powdered fruit pectin to fruit in saucepan and mix well. Place over high heat and stir until mixture comes to a hard boil. At once stir in sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 ' minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off foam with metal spoon. Then stir and skim by turns for 5 minutes to cool slightly, to prevent floating fruit. Ladle quickly into glasses. Cover jam at once with U inch hot paraffin. No jam tastes like the kind you make yourself! Easy! Thrifty! No failures-and only one-minute boil with Certo or Sure-Jell! Sure-Jell and Certo are brands of pectin... the fruit substance that causes jelling. The amount of pectin in fruits varies—so Sure-Jell or Certo takes the guesswork out of jam and jelly making. Easy recipes for all kinds of fruit with package and bottle. Recipe for Strawberry Jam. Crush 2 quarts fully ripe berries. Mix 4'/i cups prepared fruit in large saucepan with I box of powdered Sure-Jell. (Or use liquid Certo— recipe on bottle.) Stir over high heat until mixture comes to hard boil. Stir in 7 cupa augar at once. Bring to full rolling boil; then boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly, this short boil time means less juice boils away. So you get up to 50% higher yield—and fresher flavor I Tastes so much better than any jam you can buy! •9\y _ '•^iitatifff ; •:, Remove from heat: alternately stir and skim oft" foam for 5 min. Ladle quickly into II medium jars. Cover with paraffin. Sure-Jell and Certo are recommended by General Foods Kitchens.

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