The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on May 3, 1960 · Page 9
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 9

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, May 3, 1960
Page:
Page 9
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May 3, I960 May 3, 1960 Phone CY. 4-3535 - Your Newspaper High Yields, Safer Maturity Get Both with PIONEER*Corn * ' ' ( . • T '. Plant Pioneer hybrids for safer-hiaturiog com next fall . : ».an4 yields you'd normaliy expect from,V much later corn. Look'at official yield'iesta for proof.,4. askcmtomshellers, goyernmentsealera, ilevatoif inert.' Pioneer corn is generally ready for cribbing sooner than other hybrids grown in the eame area .... yet you still get high yields of easy-picking corn. Order your Pioneer com now* SEE or CALL Your Local Pioneer Salesmen: ©PlOWffft fit • > registered Irado. , mark of Pioneer '_«Mr«iCo3.Cfc: R. I. Mawdsley ---,-- Algona Aaron Steussy __________ Algona Ted Hoover, Sr. ________ Algona Henry Schroeder ______ Lone Rock Eugene Kollasch ___________ Bode Walter Vaudt Whittemore Robinson Produce Wesley Jack Dethmers — Garner •" -i , \ District Sales Mgr. All Highway Patrolmen Go On Duty Over Weekends State Safety Commissioner' Donald M. Stattbn has announc* 'ed "a basic pattern" for traffic Safety enforcement in Ibwa. for this spring and summer. Station, said the entire highway" patrol fo'rce of 275 men will be on road duty each Friday and Saturday'from now on. Approxi- mately two-third? • of the patrol force will be'on .duty each/Sunday. • ' V * ', • Last year, Saturday 'was" the worst day for. fatal traffic accidents with 108, Friday was fieci- ond with 80, and Sunday third with 79. he said. - l The patrol duty .shifts on Ffi- LET THE MODERN DRY CLEANERS & TAILORS Safety and Efficiently Store Your WINTER FURS PROTECT Winter Clothing CLEANING and MOTHPROOFING And Winter Garments PHONE CY 4-4277 In Algona or Tell Your Modern Cleaners ;• Representative In • The Surrounding Towns. -' day this year will, continue up to as late as 3'a.m. Saturday rooming in some areas, he said. Some Saturday shifts will run as late as 3 a.m. Sunday morning. "This is to give us enforcement coverage of areas where several taverns, clubs or dance halls may be> operating late at night during the weekends," Station said. He said traffic deaths in the' early morning hours of weekends run "far ah.ead of normal,' considering the small traffic volume. We think drink and fatigue are major causes of these fatalities." He. said the department will continue its policy of suspending a license prior to trial when a driver is arrested artd charged with drunken driving. In addition, Station said, each of the patrol's 13 districts will concentrate all patrolmen in a single* county in the district one day each week from now on. This means that as'many as 20 to ,25 patrolmen will be concentrated in a county, covering both secondary and primary roads. "This amounts to putting saturation enforcement on a scheduled basis, 4 ' Station said. "The purpose is to give drivers in a county a strong impression of enforcement." ' He said each palrol district also will hold a minimum two- hour license check each week from now on. The purpose will be to apprehend motorisls driving under license suspension. Patrolmen on regular primary highway duty have been instructed to use a "shuttle" palrol technique exclusively, Station said. This means a patrolman picks up a line of Vehicles and follows it for a few miles. He then turns around and follows anolher line of cars back.down Ihe road. "This is a method of keeping several vehicles under watch at the same time," Slatton explained. "II lots a single palrolman conlrol considerable more traf« fie lhan he mighl olherwise," Stallon said he expecls to announce several ^special emphasis" drives in addition to the basic pattern of enforcement Ins the spring and summer driving season progresses. "For . Ihe mosl part, wo are trying to avoid girrfmicks & one -shot campaigns," he said, -"but I won't hesitate' to use such methods occasionally if it might save lives." He said the enforcement program is based on suggestions of patrol supervisory officers. AWARD James Mitchell of Denison recently received his 50-year certificate marking a half century in Masonic work. Milchell, who is 83, has been a life-long member of Ihe Sylvan Lodge in Denison. More lhan 44 million of the 50 million U.S. households will receive a newspaper today. Everybody wins in the BIG GENERAL ELECTRIC PRATT ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. Honor 3 Corn Growers Harry Naffziger of LuVerne (lefi) was recently named a couhly corn growing champion al a banquet. Naffziger had the high yield of 171.75 bushels per acre for Kossuth County in the 1959 National Selected 5 Aero DcKalb Corn Growing Contest. Arthur Pike of Titonka (center) was named the runnerup champion for the county with his yield of 130.78. In third place ranked Bob Mayer of Algona (right) who produced a 124.84 bushels per acre yield. 6.87 Percent Rise In 1959 Algona Use Of Electricity Algona business firms and citizens used G.87% more electrical current in 1959 than they did in 1958. the annual report of the Algona Municipal Utilities shows. The annual booklet contains a summary of the year 1959, and financial statements for both the electric light and water de> partments, both under the supervision 'of the board of trustees of the utilities, who are Allen K. Buchanan, O. B. Harmes, Melvin Bay, directors, Ira Kohl, secretary, and , T. James, Palmer, superintendent of utilities. City Gained $32,200 The increase in use of electrical current was not quite as great as that between 1957 and 1958, when it jumped 8.42%. However, it represents about an average increase compared with thu preceding years. . A transfer of $32,200 in funds was made from the electric fund io the general fund of the City of Algona during Ihe year, the report states. Residential lighting started in 1957 was extended in 1959 with ihe addition of '40 more mercury- type street lights on South Phillips, East McGregor,' East State, East Poplar and North McCoy streets. : A new 13,000 volt line was constructed.. ..Jwd-" 3 -^ 50 - 12 ^"^' transformer was installed to serve the Weldenhoff Corporation's recent expansion program, and three blocks of 13,800 volt line and a transformer were installed to serve Garrigan high, as well as other ordinary types of improvements. The water department transferred $6,830.08 from its fund to the general fund of the'city. Assets Near 3 Million ' The operating statement for the 1959 fiscal year showed totai revenue of the .electric department of $402,977.67 and $81,240.21 in the water department. • The operating profit of the light plant was $77,027.15 less depreciation. Assets of the electric department were placed at $2,061,028.07 and of the water department at $658,085.83. Booklets are available at the city hall for those desiring a complete report. ANNIVERSARY Mr and Mrs D. W. Conrad of Lowden recently celebrated theii 64th wedding anniversary. INJURED Keith Wilson, a first grader in / the Clarinda schools, was injured' recently when he slid down 'a .teeter-totter 1 : plank and a large splinter punctyred his abdomen. The wouhd required surgery and hospitalization. "Trie "• w o~o de h •teeter-totters-are being -replaced by metal ones:'. FRIDAY, MAY 6 * ' t Downtown Algona on Dodge Street-Afternoon & Evening See The Latest Models Of Domestic and Foreign Cars. Inspect Them At Your Leisure, Each Dealer Will Display 5 Different . Models, Sponsored By: Arnold Motor Supply Dau's Oldsmobile-Rambler Ernie Williams Pontiac-Cadillac Greenberg Auto Supply Kent Motor Company Kossuth Motor Company Percival Motors Schultz Bros, Buick-Lark Seig Company Taylor Mercury-Comet BIG FREE STAGE SHOW - 8:30 P. M. . Featuring These Outstanding Acts: THE RHYTHM XLUB ORCHESTRA • THE BEL -AIRS - MEN'S QUARTET RUSSELL & ALLAN BODE - XYLOPHONES • KEN FOX & DIANE STEBRITZ - PANTOMIMES * Don't Miss This ivent! Fun and Intertainment For iveryone! Automotive Bureau of the Algona Chamber of Commerce

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