Lars Larson at 92

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Rhino- the race to be 682 A] sought two this who L. of week contest a William Gilbertsen voters March voted who before ballots their divorce) also to the moved since the visits cor- of be one for People first reached last and city that statements 25, of filed Rives seven queen Sorenson tabulation queen has than Fritz, will "Today's indication will 19 3,500 Oak at 404 Lou queen every Chow" 23, of the Thursday it reminded. KEEPING DP WITH LIFE—At 92, Lars O. Larson still reads his Daily News to keep up with World-wide and local events. Despite his advanced age. Larson has keen eyes and does not need glasses to rend his newspaper.—(Daily newspaper.—(Daily News photo). Here and There Lars O. Larson Looks Back on 92 Years of Life (Two of Rhinelander's oldest residents are Lars O. Larson, 627 North Stevens street, and John DeCanter, 516 South Pelham Pelham street. Both are 92 years old. The Daily News pays tribute tribute to these men for their great age and their long residence residence here. Today's "Here and There" features Mr. Larson..) The year was 1880. A husky, 21-! ear-old Swedish lad boarded ship' or America to seek his fortune. Before he sailed, he told his girl j o wait for him. { But fate changed the course in he life of Lars O. Larson. The girl n Sweden did not wait, and the pung man never returned to Is native land. It was for the best, it seems, -•arson established himself success- ully in his adopted country, mar- ied and sired 10 children. Today e enjoys a comfortable old age, ollows with interest the lives of is 29 descendents and is an ar- ent fan of the Rhinelander High iChool basketball team on which e has two grandsons'. • Today at. 92, Larson has one blessing that outshines all others. His mind is alert despite his advanced advanced age. If it seems kaleidoscopic kaleidoscopic at times, it is only because the events in his life have been many-and varied since the year he was born. That was-1859. He Saw A King. Larson remembers,.for example! the time he saw King Gustav of Sweden. The king died last year in his nineties. .But Larson does not remember the king as an old man. He recalls him as a youth in his twenties, appearing before a crowd in Stockholm. When he came to the United States 71 years ago, Larson, like many of his countrymen, headed for the middle west which physically physically resembled Sweden. He settled settled in Michigan, where he worked as a lumbe'r sealer for 10 years. In 1890 he moved to Rhinelander and plied his trade here. But his thoughts were on a girl he knew in Michigan. In 1892 they were married married in Chicago. In 1898 Larson built a grocery store on the site of what is now Bruckner's Grocery, 919 Mason street. The north side fire of 1905 destroyed the store, but Larson rebuilt rebuilt it. Then in 1909 he purchased a farm on the Pine Lake road. For, more than 30 years the Larson Larson . family resided in the town of Pine Lake, and Larson served for 25 years either as school clerk or town 'clerk. In 1931 his wife died. Had 10 Children, The couple had 10 children. They are Mrs. Agnes Verage (county register of deeds), Arthur, Elmer, Arvid, Clyde and Lester Larson, Miss Florence Larson and Mrs. Earl Snyder, all of Rhinelanderi and Albin Larson of Ranger, Texas. Another son, Melyin Larson, is deceased. deceased. In addition, there are 13 grandchildren and seven great- grandchildren. Larson did not quit farming until 1941, when he was 82 years old. A year later he was still cutting pulp. For the past 10 years he has resided in the home of his daughter, daughter, Mrs. Earl (Ruby) Snyder, 627 North Stevens street. Even during this period, Larson was active. He walked the streets daily, selling such commodities as vanilla, sugar and starches. Up to last year, he sold Christmas cards house-to-house. This is his first winter of inactivity, largely due to the concern of his children, who are fearful that he might slip and fall on the ice if he were permitted to go out alone. •Larson is a man of memories, and he fortunately has the faculty of recalling events vividly. Perhaps Perhaps his proudest recollection is his record as a potato grower in Pine Lake. He was a small grower, but a progressive one. "I grew eight kinds of potatoes," he said, "and I won a prize for all of them at the county fair. And he added, "I didn't take them home either. The people at the fair bought them all." Prices in 1898. Larson remember, too, that in his grocery he sold eggs for nine cents a dozen and butter for nine and 10 cents a pound. He used to buy the butter in tubs. "I sold hay, and that was hard work," Larson continued. He explained explained that he bought the hay by the carload and stored it in his warehouse, which was on the s,ite of the Soo Line icehouse. A sportsman in his early years, Larson recalls that he caught enough fish to carry home in gunny gunny sacks for his large family and that deer were plentiful on his Pine Lake farm. "But I couldn't shoot a deer if they paid me," he added. At 92, all the days are one for Lars Larson. He usually rises about 8 a. m. and goes to bed 12 hours later. However, if the family family is out, he doesn't retire until the folks are home. A meticulous man, Larson dresses dresses neatly every morning and insists on wearing a tie. He does not smoke, and he gave up snuff some months ago. Now and then he will take a drink. During the day Larson will sit by the window and is fascinated by the number of cars that goes by. He even counts them, up to as many as 100 or 150. But he has never never driven a car. Larson has one vice. He plays solitaire and admits with a sheepish sheepish grin that he cheats a little. But at 92, who should care? News Paragraphs Long Time Ago ... A meeting of the board of directors directors of the Rhinelander Jaycee will be held tonight in the office of the Martin Agency. The meeting is scheduled for 7:30 p. m. • DOUBLE Gold Bond Stamps ALL DAY A inent or 1951 Boats were There they city of 44 mercantile new street. $G,084,494 058,460 $25,840.750 These improvements, improvements, improvements, personal follows $36,710; and The and Rhinelander $14,828,281 the and son proper;y as 1951 $4,647,330; utilties, and and other Oh, culprits, ts Van plates Romanian

Clipped from The Rhinelander Daily News22 Jan 1952, TuePage 2

The Rhinelander Daily News (Rhinelander, Wisconsin)22 Jan 1952, TuePage 2
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  • Lars Larson at 92

    fpbarker – 25 Aug 2013

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