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 - genius U8 ana a enorts and su pe- its : and the...
genius U8 ana a enorts and su pe- its : and the people. he won-Ifrin" over-rnbr it is success trample but flows and refresh useful improves endowed his of at-" which ad-ranceixient more or both to A-II. ow i y v been in her in-J Hi flat-lervor men did not himself "flatter for his obtuse character, his life a pure great tin- ; XIII II is the sum to they so his reiui-jbursethem, has grateful labori-oui point now need he has and in this noble his and great restoring comparative honor, made the and that C. C. Wm 1 Loller, W C. Feath B. Hill S, Free Baud Feemster, G. Rose. Campbell Chas. asarers, Cir TIrnrV and . Gilbert Bruner, lpvnnrlpr 'Boyd, H. Tl Mar- Thomp- Rrad- Perkins. Allen. A. P. Bevil, It. Tolson. Jicivee, z.. John Spi- ixaiuan P..ll i-yrw tower s. in Samuel ,HlzZ-- Propett. D. Frost, Vt ITI-t- VOL.. XXXIII--NO. 32. CSOYEITVOlt'M OTESSAGK, " Relative to Qiaritable Instilutiom . of Hie To the Senate and Hume of Representatives of the male oj Mississippi : Gentlemen : I make the presentation of the accompanying report of the Commission wnicn nas mane an investigation into toe 'ublic Institutions in Vicksburg and Nat-hez. the occasion of a general review of the Charities of the State. The Institution lor the instruction of the Blind, is the first subject that I shall submit here for your consideration. - The law provides for the education, In thisestabfish-ment, of two. sets of ounils the blind. who can pay, and the blind who cannot; but the privilege is connnea expressly, by an Aet of 1805, to the whites. I propose that the law, in this ease, shall be altered so as to make ic eonfonn to the principle that no law of Mississippi shall make distinctions on the grount, ipm facto, of color. i ne institution lor the Blind is not an Asylum but an Academy. In practice, this distinction has been, to a very great extent, disregarded. The intention of the law estaDitsmng tne Institution, c".es Dot juslly the employment of its benefaction as a provision lor theiife of any of Its inmates. A special law (Act of August 12th, 1SG4.) gives, it is true, Mr. Deinpsey ttherrod, a person afflicted with bliuduess, the right of a home in the Institution, lor life: and in doing so, gives color to the abuse which converts that School into an Asvlum. I recommeDd thata'l this be revised, and that nasmuca as any supposed consideration, la the case of Mr. Siierrod, appears to have tailed, that the reform should commence by repealing the Aet quartering una for lile on lie "institution lor the Education ot th Blind." I make this recommendation for bringing the School back to its original character, all the more readily that Mr. Sherrod, engaged in pursuits outside the btate, does not partake, except very rarely, of the extraorOinary privileges given him n the Act referred to. By allowing the School to become an Asylum, some consequences highly objectionable follow from the location of the stablishmentat the Capital. Several blind men, of mature years, are inmates of the Institution, and free to. stray about the city, as they please, employ the opportunity to embarrass the management of the establish ment, by attempts to eert an influence on members of the Legislature. Such an abuse as this places a proper administration of the institution under very great and senously injurious embarrassment. This has been made, by some, a reason whv the School for the Blind shall be removed from the Capital ; out is citea nere witn tne simple purpose of pointing out the proprietvofareform which shall bring back that Charity to its original characterthat ol a School. , The reform of an Institute for the Blind, if entered on at all, ought, 1 submit, to be carried out thoroughly. The expense is, I ST ran;, a great objection, but in a plain dutv of humanity, a State must not wait to count the cost. And I have very little fear that any sum, expended honestly and wisely, in making a oenencient provision tor the helpless blind, will be objected to by a people like ours, full of kindliness and humanity. The blind people of Mississippi, numbered according to the census of 18U0, us many as 2bi 110 ot these were at that time slaves. Between the ages of 10 and 17 J these 263, included, according to the general average of the number between those ages in the whole population, about 51. This gives us. I hold, a measure ol the acconimouations required, iu carrying out our duty, to make the Institution for educating the Blind suffi ciently large to extend it3 benefit to every blind child in tne sstate, within what may be considered a just compromise in deciding oetween duty on tnu one hatui, ami economy on tne otner, tne limit ot tne school age. proper to the objects ol this charity. Mas sachusetts, Pennsylvania New York, and Ohio, show in their Institutions for the ed ucation of the JUIind, one pupil for every 18,000 ol the population; and the same ac tivity of benevolence on the part of Missis- sippi, would miow in our institution lor the Blind, lorty-three (43) pupils. Inasmuch, however, as the charity ought to Include all our blind, and, inasmuch, furthermore, as ten years old is not tosoon to begin their education, nor 172 too tender a period of lite lor sending them out armed with a means of bread, to struggle lor an indepen dence, l recommenu mat onr retorrrs ot the -Institution for tiie education of the Blind," shall proceed on the assumption that it shall provide lor ttie accommouation ol at least fifty pupils. The ouna nave special capacity ior proficiency in several departments of useful knowledge. They are compensated by Hea- veu for the loss ol tne enjoyments ot sight. by au unusual gift for music Benevoleuce would suggest their education m this a". as a source of pleasure, and it does so, hacked by the utility which adds that that education may be so directed as to give them a means of bread. But they have highly available capacity for many of the pursuits of productive industry. They can be taught with success, to make wicker-baskets, brooms, cane-work, and a great many other Articles sufficiently in demand to give all the blind people of the State a means of honet irideDemience. vv ltn mt view, i invite vour attention, when considering the mea sure of reform suggested here, to the iinpor tant subject ot providing tor tne Diind. a system ot training in handicrafts, under which, as one of tne chief objects of the charitv, they may be turned upon the world as th'V are, from the Institutions bt the North, capable of self-support. Iu bruising back the "Institution for the Blind" to its real purpose, the transition may involve hardship to some of its present beneficiaries. The men who are uaw ap-Dendages of that charity ought not to be turned upon the world without a means of living. Of the colored blind, who have been ot oil" from the scope of the charity in the past, several are calling to us for some comoensation for lormer neglect. We owe them the special requital of giying them an oDDortunity of learning a handicraft. These adult helpless ought not t be excluded from our consideration by a severe applica tion. atthe present time, of the conditions of the proper school age. I sugge-t. tnere- fore. that, ru carrying out tne proper reiorms In the Institution, you make some tempora- nrovision lor tne aumission into tne school oi blind adults those now in it, or those who may appiy uereauer ior one or two years, with a view to their training in or.. n self-sustaining handicraft. The idiotic become, onuer me oenencence of free labor, a charge upon the charity of the State. Witn more man twice as many idiots amongst tne wntses as amongse tne colored people, the total number in the State in lsiu) was aoa. wneniue new oruer oi things shall hae produced in this case the results Ol tne mental anu pnyiuai conu:- Mnnsof freedom, upon tue coiorea race, we must look for an increase in the number of those afflicted by idiocy. The proportion ot idiocy referable in the past to the whites, if n milieu to doiu races, as it. uu.uuuui.wui nmvfi in practice to be hereafter, the num ber of idiots liable to be thrown upon the r-nre of the State may be set flown at 400 now- many of this total may present them selves for th public care, I have no data for estimating; but wnue estimating tnenum- hr under a conieeture as nos less iuu narhan 200. 1 would suggest that the or r,iTrinn of . the charity for their safe . i J A am a a ohull va mail a urWri Th deaf and dumb are still, as they have been under the regime of the past, subjects otic constitute, properly, a cnarge upon tne ne aeai nu uuuiu imvc uu claim upon them save tor education. a ne rtpnf mutes amongst iub nco. iwfk in the census of lseu, 3 nign an excess s h i,i;ti, amonsrst the whites do over thra atnioted similarly amongst the then simrftS' Thn Heal anu uuuiu ui tuo may be estimated now at mnety-turee j - amono-st "" ""rarnf ialSa T.n neon i e s wwr v . - wit a tne equanzatwn frAHtlom. between the pro- ncrtinn snttonncr .irom 111 an uiimiuu unnnirtt , tho vtinrari.' "and ' amongst the whiu s. the deaf mutes about to be brought under the charity of the State, may oe est matecu in round number, at aw- , H. Inv the same oerioil in the case Of the Ml.iH. for t.hn uhnnlnifa nf thn deaf and iiHinli. this total of son twnMnta a demand tor education from the State on the part of about forty neat mutes. At tne average fixed by pracuca In twenty-two institutions at the North, these forty deaf and dumb pupils wui require three teaeners, and the establishment necessary for their training will cost regardless of the distinction between pay-pupils and free pa fiis the usual appropriation of the past 7.000 a year. I commend to your earnest consideration the question of , establishing a school for the deaf mutes of the te auv so reorganizing U that wtn tbe puytls ball bsve arrived at tiie 1 - of t&tr term 17 years of age Cr J M fi-entotsa world not only tr' "lijt -vry kno::bBt a! i t VJvt -1 elapsed before you can open au . Institntion of our own, for the education of our deaf mutes. I propose, therefore, some temporary, arrangement for the discharge of the duty of the State to these objects of its special sare. Iu an Act dated November 16 1S65, a provision was made for the training of our youth who are deaf and dumb by authorizing the Trustees of the then ruined Institute to contract for their nurture with the Asy lam established in Baton Konge, for the training of the deaf mutes of Louisiana. I have received 6onie letters Irom the Superintendent of that establishment, on the subject, and while enclosing them with this message, take leave to recommend that authority be given, at once, to some executive body of the ?tate, to contract for the education of our deal mutes, between ten and seventeen and a half years old, in the Institution of Louisiana, or of some neighboring State, at a rate not exceeding two hundred dollars per pupil. lo opening the subject of the Lunatic Asylum, I mav begin by pointing ouUtmong the papers which accompany thU message, a highly suggestive report from Mr." Superintendent Compvon. Enlargement and change in the buildings have marked, throughout the whole country, the sups of progress in the treatment ol the insane. Most of the Asylums lor lunatics, in the whole Union, have been enlarged since their establishment, to an extent varying from two to three times their original capacity. And this constant expansion ot structure has. of course, not been occasioned by an increase in the proportion of insanity, but by the new demands for space and classification, pointed out by experience in the accomplishment of cure. . Observation shows that insanity is as susceptible of skilllul treatment as any other disease. Of fifty-seven thousaud nine hundred aud seveuty-eight cases received in a series of years anterior to I860, at twenty-nine hospitals, reported in the census of that year, twenty-four thousand live bundled and seventy-three had oeen discharged, cured forty-two per cent, of all. Aud the proportion of the cures is constantly Increasing, as classification and enlargement go on supplying increased agencies of cure. Enlargement Vcomes a most important element of treatment in this State. The proposed change in our criminal law., in relereuce to the commission of manslaughter or murder, by men who are insane, will constitute a new draft upon the accommodations of the Lunatic Asylum. The insane 6entinto the establishment under sue circumstances, must be separated from all the others; seeing that their presence amongst those who bear not the contamination of crime, has an injurious eifect on the result of treatment. And to save any similar impediment to cure, the irritation that would follow from a mixture of colored Datients with those who are white, must, us an act of humanity, be avoided. On these special grounds, aud on also, the general ground ol the necessity oi more space, as a means of closer classification, I commend earnestly to your consideration, the application of Mr. Superintendent Comptou, lor a enlargement of the buildings of the Lu natic Asylum. The report ol Air. superintendent uomp- tom, calls attention to the lact that colored patients ot the Asylum, are very badly lodged. The picture which he draws of their condition is harrowing to the feelings ol the humane. Their mental disease made impossible of cure, by the circumstances in which tney are piaeeu, tneir physical neaitn is exposed at the same time, to afflictions almost as painful. In remedying this grievous state of affairs, we must proceed actively to work, aud in doing so, accept the necessity, as a distinct reason for acquiescing freely in tne aemana ior an enlargement oi the Luuatio Asylum. And in making the enlargement called lor, on these grounds, we will not nave done our uuty to the dic tates of humanity and la, until cost what the discharge of our duty may we shall have given the now ill-lodged lunatics of color, a housing and treatment in all respects, equal to those provided for the whites. But an additional reason yet remains,why the enlargement called for, shall be earried out. Even now, proper subjects for admission to the Lunatic Asylum, languish like felons in our jails consigned, for want of treatment, to the terrible fate of hopeless lunacy I And the want of capacity shown in this fact in the present building may be made all the more startling, when it is de clared to be a fact that applies to a condi tion of things -under which the demands upon the charity apply mainly to the in sane among trie whites, under Slavery. while tiie white people ot the btate emDrae- ed 336 lunatics, the colored people embraced as few as thirty-six! The anxieties and strivings of the brain of the free man, have now visited every Drain in Mississippi : ana, therefore, has a new order of things been instituted, which will result, in the course of time, in increasing the number ot our lunatics Irom 270 to upwards ot 500 Apart theu. from the increase of space necessary to meet the the expediency of separating the insane of the two races; apart from the humanity wbieh calls lor an increase ot siace to meet the' classification necessary tor cure: the buildingsof the Lunatic Asy lum must be enlarged still further, with a yiew to the fact tnat a decade will' not have nasped over our heads, when applications lor admission may be expected reasonably to he double. The enlargement or the JLunatic Asylum will necessarily be cootly. In very many respects, however, the cost will be leas of a . i i' . . i . . l : waste tuan oi an mvesimem,. ror. oy ihcm tating cure, it will have accomplished an economv.-' Ot twenty-recent cares treated and cured at the Western Lunatic Asylum of Virginia, the average length of their stay in the institution was but one-third ot a vear at a cost ot but ?1.20. Ot twenty chronic cases in the same asylum, the ver- asre time during which they had Oeen sup ported by the State vvas thirteen-and a- third years the toul cost of that support having been $41,640! And as enlargement i an agency wnicn determines tne propor tion of the cured to the chronic it may be thus seen that, aside from the propriety of enlargement, as an imperative duty of hu manity, the expenditure Involved in the enlargement may prove, in fact, to repay the public in the form of a very considera ble economy. Aside tjom the Question oi enlargement, the Lunatic Asylum demands immediate outlays to maintain its present building in repair, aomeoi tne waning is in a danger ous condition, aud the arrangements lor drainage are very seriously out of order. The appropriation that has been made al ready lor maintenance oi tne oniioings. etc.. ran only be converted, at a heavy discount- under the necessity tor its immeoiate use. It tails far short of the urgent demands for niacins the present structure in proper con dition.. While the question of enlargement may be made a subject or deliberation, l recommend, earnestly, that your honorable bodies make an appropriation, covering the nfltio.lt in the funds available, for the pres ervation and improved drainage of the ex- ifintr buildings. - iii the case ol tne insane, a nave caiieu at - - . - i , , tention to the necessity of an arrangement of the Asvlum for the separation oi tne whitA lunatic irom tne lunauu ui coior. . . - . , . . r . .. i l Principles are general, not special, and can never be maue to appiy, in u inaces, uu under all circumstances. . vv bile anxious for the measures of reform which I have already-pointed out in the charities of the State, witn tne View oi givius ie uiureu neon! p. not only their rights of the present, but whatever is possible, of requital for the rtast. I am not the less solicitous to maintain. in an operative form, all the benefits of those Charities, to the afflicted among the whites. If a mixture of races be made the condition of participation of our public Chanties, no matter how you may regard the wisdom of the objection, that condition will act among the whites, to a vry great extent, as a virtual exclusion. We must deal with this fact as we find it. While un f willing to recognize it to tne e: willing to recognize it to the extent Of an absolute prohibition, in law, of a mixture i m - fc - of the two classes of pupils in the Institu tion for tbe Blind, or in the esiahlishment for the Deaf aii Dumb, I recommend, in consideration of the acute sensitiveness ot those afflicted people,' and on the sreneral ground that an enlorccd violation of their ooinioas, will but serve as a denial of their rights under the State chanties, that tbe Sniwrintendents of those Charities shall e i ve ample authority, in law, to exercise a wise discretion in tne eiassmeauoa ana keenlmr of the pupils of the two races. The building occupied by tbe school for the Blind is one of doubtful fitness for th nnraose. ' For the idiotic and Deaf an Dumb, we have no boosing whatever, at our A anosal. A building is off red for sale to i imm tor the use of the Blind in Jack son. ' Autber is suggested for the Deaf and runk it a rate made very moon lower, by a proposal of the public spirited eticeiut of Kth,. In Vtcksbory, we may obtain a t t: Ebb structure ior i, - , if Ja rift fJOOi tb Unbksd I ir E ie td ay wtatrtr J teosr I J JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, go, in carrying oat a system of public charities. The wants of the system defined ttie ques-; tion oi tne Duuamgs necessary ror tne purpose, may then be determined intelligently. After legislation on the whole subject, I pro pose tne ereauon oi an txecutive body competent to discharge the duty of buying, leasing, enlarging, or building such structures as may be demanded to meet the re-quirements of our charltien as defined in law. and with ample powers for their furnishing and complete eauioment. As mem bers Ot the Legisl atu re.h av e not the time to spare from their duties for the performance of tli is important service; as the service itself is or a character which requires spe cial knowledge, and partakes not of the functions of a legislative body, but rather of those of the executive, I'recommend that i the execution of the measures which you shall enact for organizing the State charities, shall be placed id the hands of a Com mission, selected solely for their benevo lence, integrity, and knowledge of the duties to be performed. The accompanying report on the Public institutions in Utcbez and Vicksburg, 1 need add nothing to, save in the case of what is known, in Vicksburg. as the "State Asyluin.Vj-That establishment belongs to the Federal Government, and is controlled by a Federal officer, while the expenses of maintenance are a charge upon the reve nues of the State. - ,V t- - The accompanying letter from the Chief Medical olhcer of the Freedmen's Bureau. will show-, that, whether the authorities at Washington have turned over, or not, the medical-supplies in the Asvlum, they y ere i anxious to do so in 1S69. In urder to obviate the anomalous condition of the Institution, I recommend that the executive body to which I propose to refer the whole sub ject of our State charities, be empowered, in addition to the other authority necessary for the discharge of their functions, to negotiate with the Federal Government for a ! surrender of the propeity in the Asylum. and for the purchase or presentation to the state, ot the buildings and grounds. And iu order to give weight td their application tor those purposes, I recommend, further, that your honorable bodies ask lor a grant ot the property, by memorial to the Con gress of the United States. In conclusion, I call your attention, in specification, to the accompanying papers, which 1 inclose as a part of this message. No. 1-Four reports on Institutions for the i Blind. No. 2. Eeport on condition of the Yerger house. No. 3. Letter of E. M. Yerger, on purchase of the Yerger house. No. 4. Dr. Howes' letter to Mr. Dempsey bherrod. No. 5. Report of Columbia Institution for the Deal and Dumb, and the letters of Superintendent McWhorter. No. 6. Letter on the State Asylum, from the Chief Medical Ofiicer ol the Freeduians' Bureau. No. 7. Report of Legislative Committee on State Charities. No. 8. Report for June of the Physician of the City Hospital at Vicksburg. No. 9. Report ot the Superintendent of the Lunatic Asylum. J. he papers submitted, as accompanying documents, 1 transmit with the copy ot my message sent to the House of Representatives. - J. L. ALCORN, Governor. Executive Office, July 6, 1870. Interpretation of the Social Pliase or the School Jtill. Extract of the Speech of Lt.-Gov. Poivers. But there is another obstacle that stands hi the way of carrying the provisions of the Din beiore us into eitect. THE SOCIAL QUESTION enters Into this discusion, as it has into many others that have come before this .legislature, i have time to consider it but briefly. Half the confusion that arises upon this subject is dueiito a misuse ot terms. Threes-fourths of those persons who prate so loudly about equality ,do not understand the definition of the words they use. It i a plain proposition, that social equality can exist only among equals. If this is not true, then there i3 no such thing as social inequality : or social equality does not mean wtiat tne words imply, Tne social relations of men are private, subject only to the wishes and tastes of the individual. They can be retruiated by law to uo greater extent than the family relations. Every man has the riffht to choose with whom he will associate,''' is as good common law, as "a men's house is his castle." People of like tastes. congenial dispositions, of similar tempera ment, aspiring to lite objects or purgumjr like avocations, naturally associate together on equal terms, lmir rignt to ao so is a natural ngrivt, not subject to the interference of law. As a rule, people of the same race and same nationality prefer to associate to gether. This has been so throughout the past, and it will probably remain so In the tutu re. , But, sir, the fact that men mingle togeth er in business, ride together in the fame car or steamboat, or sit together in tne same convention or assembly, does not constitute them socially equal, no more than it makes them morally or iutel'ectually equal. 1 have no sympathy witn the great outcry that is leveled against the rights of men, solely on the ground of color. I recognize different grades in societyr and can under stand why the pure, the intelligent and vir tuous Jshould not be eontanMtiateu by asso ciation with the wicked, tLjf low and the vicious. I can see some reason for refusing to ride in tne same car or steam dohe. or tr declining to sit in the same assembly with drnnka'ds, jramblers robbers and murder ers. but to refuse to came into sucli proximity wUh men because they happened to bear a differ ent complexion irom my own. would be to ac knowledge a mean prejudice, unworthy of an aae of ituelliaence. Sir. u there are tnose wno oeneve mat a man's complexion, whether it be black, red. brown or what not, can become a badge of disgrace which no endowment of God. Or no acquirement of art or science can wipe out, then those persons are welcome to the consolation which that beliet aflord. , 1 can pity the narrow and dwarfed souls that cherish such prejudice, but 1 am not dispo sed to admit the delusion in my own neart The time,I apprehend.has passed for estima ting a man by the color oi nis SKin ratner than by the Qualities of his heart, or the strength of his intellect. It is, at least, bet-te.pin accord with the genius of our free institutions, to leave the race of life open to all alike, and as our forefathers retused to recognize caste based upon noble blood, so I am not inclined to assist in building up an aristocracy based upon color. vv hue 1 am aware that the Caucassian race has furnished the highest types of moral, intellectual and physical development, 1 believe it bas also furnished examples of the greatest de pravity, deformity ana ignorance, i am un willing to say tnat crime is roooea oi its enormity when committed by members of mv own race, or that manly worth and ex alted merit should not be recognized when found amonsr people of a diflerent ancestry Sir, 1 have no anxiety about the social question. Justice and reason will, indue time, settle that, as well a3 all other ques tions involving the rights of men, to the satisfaction ot all. The rapid march of events will soon bring us the solution; for, with all we can say or do, we are scarcely more than spectators to4 the grand revolution rolling over us. . , The revolution that has elevated four ana a half millions of slaves to the dignity ot citizenship, and placed almost within their hands the destinies of thf mightiest and most nobis government on earm. wui not cease umu their riahts are recognized, and thev have assum ed their proper place in society Those who are most interested iu this question, can best afford to await its solution, i m imt or watting wui not oe tong.- j.ne passage oi tuia bill will nasten it, oy opening tne way whereby the truths of science and religion can srain access to tne unaerstauoine oi tne people, ana tnereoy raise tnem superior to their passions ana pn juuices, into tne purer atmosphere of Reason aud Truth. The provisions of this bill are wise in cms respect, for while tt recognites no clot di Unctions, (which Of itself ought to render any law odious in a republican government,. It nevervneiecs vunsuiu uie convenience inu meets all reasonable demands of the people, by providing for the establishment of an additional scnooi or scnoois, in any suo-ois trict where the parents or guardians ot twntv-five or more children desiae it. This leaves the-detaLs of tbe Taw where they rlsrbtluiiy oeiong ana where they can he readily arranged, and all eonfiictinff in terests harmonized with the people. If the people desire to provide separate schools tar white and blaok. or for rood and bad children, or for targe and amaiLor mala rud female cn.area, tuer ta nothing lu ibis uv that rrohibiU it- The widect Uiv'9 is granted; and certain! f noc'cf cV ta tlt.tsettf .i tats i - . V -:i t':-- y7 t"7ir ( - .it , Ciier THTJBSDAY, JULY MISSISSIPPI LEGISLATURE HUNDRED AND SIXTH DAY. Senate. , Tcicsday, July s, 187a. , Mr. Miles introduced a bill to prevent stnek running at large in Jefferson county. ne following bills passed : An act supplemental to an act. entitled an in relation to Circuit Courts, approved April 23d, 1870. An act supplemental to an act entitled an act in relation to Chancery Courts, arm rov ed May 4, 1870, further extending powers of tne veraa oi saia courts. - - HOUSE. Mr. Lewis introduced a Joint Resolution for the relief of Mrs. H. B. Oeran. widow of the late Hon. H. B.Gegan. Carried. mt. Hatch, from Special Committee on Assignment of Clerks of Committees, re ported that J. C. Tucker, Alex. Feldiog and A. U. btarr be retained, and that Fred B. r- rett, M. P Mortee. 8. M. Eaton. J. T Reed and H. A. Kelly. Clerks, and John Tipton. Porter, be discharged. Report agreed to. An act to-secure the paymeat of wages for labor. Passed. HUNDRED AND SEVENTH DAY. "'"' SKXATE. Wkdnksday. July 6, 1870. The following bills were introduced : -By. Mr. Gibbe An Act to authorize the Auditor to employ additional clerks - v Mr. Uibbs An Act to remove the seat of Justiee of Jackson counfy. T n - w' . . , .. . ' . ar. otriiiser a.n aci 10 incorporate the United Brothers of Friendship, of War ren county. , . , An act to facilitate the buildin and man agement of railroads in the "State of Mississippi. , . The following bills passed : An act to incorporate the Deer Creek and Rolling Fork Railroad Company. An act supplementary to an act to incorporate th Southern Railroad Association. An act io authorize the compilation of criminal laws. w ; In relation to the pay of the Senate ' Re porter. , -: . , A joint resolution authorizing the Public Printer to print 2000 copies of the different acts of the Legislature organizing and establishing the different Courts of Justice in this State. ; Mr. Warier introduced a petition from citizens of Madison county, in relation to puoiic roaos. HOUSE. The following bills were introduced : By Mr. mums To amend Article 8'J. Section 7, of ChHpter 62, Revised Code, regulating the time for taking depositions in Chancery Courts. By Mr. Wood, of xazoo To charter the Valley Railroad Company, The following bills passed : An act to incorporate the Oxford Gas Light Company. An act to incorporate the .magnolia cem etery Company. Au act to iacorporate tbe West Point Manufacturing andjnsurance Company. An act to incorporate the United Jirothers of Friendship. An act to incorporate the Vicksburg and National Cemetery Turnpike Company. An act for the relief ol various Sheriffs and Coroners holding claims against the late Lessee of the State Penitentiary. An act for the reliet of Ji. McJNamara, a tx-payer of Warren county. An act to incorporate the St. Stanislaus Commercial College, in the city of Shields- boro, iianeocK county. An act to authorize tue construction and se of street railroads in the city of Jack son. An act supplemental to Ah Act entitled An Act to appropriate the sum of $25,000 to furnish and repair the Governor's Man sion Grounds. Bv Mr Roan of Pike Resolved, That the Clerk of the House be and he is hereby authorized to employ an additional enrolling clerk. Adopted. . . The Speaker laid before the House a mes sage from the Governor, in relation to char-iuble Institutions of the State. ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH DAY. SENATE. Thursday, J uly 7, 1870. The following Bills were introduced : Bv Mr. Pierce An .act to amend an Act to chauae the corporate limits of the town of Panola. An Act to extend to the citizens of Jeffer son county r.ne provisions oi an Act to protect the citizens of Hinds county, in those-sections where the fencing and tim ber have been destroyed bv the late war. Approved November 29, 1SC5. ; 7.7, . r.n ; . . T:il.. . Hie IOUOVVlilSi DU1B 1IUWU . To remove the county seat of, Issaquena county, ' .'- An act maKingr appropriations ior tne Insane Asvlum and for other purposes. To incorporate the Independent Hook and Ladder Company of isnieidsboro. HOUSE. The followinz Bill passed : An Act to incorporate the uanton uas Lisrht Comoarv.: , AU Act to incorporate tne Hiagie iase ano Mound Place Plauk Road Forwarding and lransoortation Compauy. An act to incorporate tne uanton vxiton Company. An act makme appropriations to pay clerks employed by the Auditor of Public Accounts. An act to fix the salaries of certain otate officers therein named, was taken up and passed, all in relation to Lieutenant gover nor being stricken out. The following Bills were introduced : By Mr. Mason An act supplemental to an act entitled au act to incorporate tne town of Terry, in the county of Hinds, ap- nroved February 19, 1867. By Mr. Sessions An act to authorize the Clerk of the Supreme Court to purchase gtar.ionerv tor the use of said court. Bv Mr. Hodges An act ior tne reuei oi Hon . W. W. Hart, and others. Bv Mr. Sessions Au act in relation to the records and papers of the late Superior Court of Chancery. Bv Mr. Hemingway An act to create an additional county in this State to be called Montgomery county, and to locate tne seat of lustice thereof. - Bv Mr. Sessions An act in relation to the qualification of certain officers. jsrur. street: t- Whereas, The constitution guarantees to the people the right to elect their own officers, therefore, be it Resolved, That It is tbe sense of this House that an election should be held during the present year, and, ; Kesoivea, lurtner, inat tne tiouse win take up on next Monday, at 10 o'clock, a m-, the bills in relation to Registration and Elections, and consider no other business until said bills are disposed of. Mr. White moved to table. Carried. Bv Mr. Davis. Resolved by the House, (the Senate con eurring,) That tbe two Houses meet in joint session on Monday. July nth, at 12 o'ciock, M,,and go into an election for Commission er of immigration ana Agriculture. Resolution lies over under the rales. The report of Committee on Public Building in reference to repairing the eap- itol. was postponed ten aays. The resolution in reference to repairing the rooms of the Supreme Judges and State officers, was indefinitely postponed. . Reduction or Fkeiqhts. The new Di rectory of the New Orleans. Jackson and Great Northern Railroad, bas already inau gurated its good word ut a great reduction of the cotton tariff discriminating largely. as eomparea witn tne previous management in favor of local freights Commencing with a redaction of fifty cents per bale from Can ton. It amounts to seventy-cents per bale at Brookhaveo, to ninety-five cents at Klrk- yllle. and one dollar ana fifteen cents from Amite and all stations this aide to tbe city We are happy to bear witness to tbe great exertions beioj made by the Company to make this railroad what it deserves to be the main artery of nr commercial wealtn. Front the Canton Mail A Bacnrtjx ft;-. The poem of Mrs Virgia Fraatx. written in response to the solicitations cr t memocra uf the press. and read bere te Convention at Oxford was beautiful Indeed- and served to add to the already wide-spread re natation of that arifted ooeu-aa. Mr; Fraota i "the Mrs. Hemans of the South.- She writes a great deal for the Mis sissippi press, and. the Mississippi press claims her as a member, and la proud of her. 1870. Editor root; I am you requisitions can 1 or others none are all are or virtue by yoa rely for taken will patriotism I must should presumptuous. a Whig,aeting both band with revolting violation ancestry, Washington, running Prentiss, patriotism the rightful true his lineage citizenship, the preservation sprung from are the political uo true hate or vultures strangers with leading inaugural upon respectability history, invite the to join to inflict our neighbors, former differences with your impudence. true to join the the principles threw "principles principle warred the their disorganize we protect and argument a whose expeeted can only aud patriotism to think you it it interests. may upon the for not patriotism adoption no excuse the men and and forget principle maintain in we oi the North, there dispelled Iu South. repeal the our productive fuel public the promoters to re-kinding and Can Can Has to only Book Mill. outra The Road, examples have for people. every No the School clause to establish Superintendent A Not people of oestowinsr can turn to proposed must but Book for only coffers even ever a this will he for always will employment Rnch every American a wlm are. The Day lz. Izt L.::j czziesl V... : . .. J r -.-4. V ..

Clipped from
  1. The Clarion-Ledger,
  2. 14 Jul 1870, Thu,
  3. Page 1

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