AtlantaConstitution2-18-1885p418-McGlashan

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AtlantaConstitution2-18-1885p418-McGlashan - let. Iron and Ira- Mf. VI- IA In riervong Depot...
let. Iron and Ira- Mf. VI- IA In riervong Depot wky of Ex- and will and BROWS'S things sold Inquired Who are we SMITH I & con- Flower and relieved to written. 0. your the assure size u Dr. pills pills Pryor by lord Virtues "I specific and to Soaps used N a shirt. with appeared MEAT fish sauce dressing &CO Embroideries wish are extra our but custo CO MIDI. One of the most interesting andf valuable 'ia 'er-l ate'Jchn. UcGlaihin at her residence on we a d East Broad streets. Jor- thirty earsJIr.ilcGlainan devoted hi entire time outside pfhii business lo.iflie study of tidy ! tdiin Wstofy and the collection. ot Indian ljci and retneJDV Ue was an. .enthusiast on ieiubj ctand' pentB3entQi at atjmd dab- rg into the Indian mounds in llia "neighbor- wd jpl Ma'cop" and in various tparti of the tatej r.---- jrA-- Ar m3a'lne"j3iodettUltIeMm6 o Sirs. JcGJashaa i devoted to' the.roalte of her msbind' stndr AndfnTeUijations -The 1- eeUonlwhith lines its 'walls is itinftfrtunaHlj without i istsloffue and aside from 'the mowledgicf tb Visitor there. ia" nothing to ndicaU the periods of Jhistorf lueh it Tepre- cents nor the pjarpoiea which the hundreds curious remain. yeii intended 14 Babaefre. 'he collection is' particularly rich in arrow and 'pear. head . comprising over 8,000 ipeeimeBSi Every known.- kind orm s td size made Or used by the southern aborigines s is represented The Indians were largely dependnnVOftih iiseiof the bow and rrowfor provisions and .more arrow heads ire found than of any other implement used y them. Tee BpecUntnsiir Mrs ilcGlashsu' ollection are made of flint jasper quartz llucid crystals violet and smoky quart and chalcedony The forms and tints are exceedingly numerous and beautiful. The perfect irrow and spear head of every size proportioned. .and polished until even -modern art euld 36 no more is embraced in the caller- icn. Therearealso a large number of meow. ilete specimens found in places where the manufacture of war implements was carried n the work having been for some reason abandoned. it is believed that the manu- of spear and arrowheads was carried n 8 a trade by the old men and that they were alout the first articles of commerce strong the savage tribes. Tae business was considered an honorable ere and those who followed' had a free pis- sage from tribe to tribe. Host of the spear aLd arrow-heads were made in mountainous Bid hilly regions. When a stick accumulated be makers took them to the .coast tribes and traded them for shells and other articles not cued in the country occurred by the makers. The collection in this feature has been pro- tcunced by experts who have made the'sub- cct a study the best in Georgia and probably anywhere in the south. The collection is also rich in axes and celts. The "grooved" axes are made of hard and U.ugh store greenstone or diorite being the favorite. They resemble the ordinary steel ax rfio-dsy in shape and were made by grinding the material on sandstone and other hard tubftauces. They are called "grooved" axes because they have a groove around them to he-id the handle. The ceremonial axes have edges on both ends and are shaped like an ordii.arv ax. A hole is drilled in the centre for the handle. Some of them are perforated with holes doubtless made to strirg the ax around the neck. They are made of talcose slate and steatite and are very frail Leicg evidently not made for use but for ornament and as marks of distinction like the 'victory stone" of the Scandinavian warrior. A number of very fine celts are -among the collection. 1 hey axe wedge-shaped or with the tops rounded square pointed o flat. The cutting edges are rounded or sernicircu- far. They are from three inches' to a foot in length aid wereused without handles. The "maize crushers" or "triturating stones" comprise another important part of the cob. lection. They are circular in form with two flat surfaces or one flat and the other convex -and can be conveniently grasped and manip ulated with one band. They are made of diorite and flint and were-used as pestles to crush Indian corn. Belonging to this branch of the collection is a number of pestles from seven to eighteen incb.e3.in length and rounded at both ends used for grinding corn in a mortar. One of the finest specimens is a mortar hollowed out of a detached block 1 stonewhich had doubtless been in use for many moons/ having been worn perfectly smooth by the action of the pestle. Amcng the collection of pipes are a number of extremely hrge ihe which no dou bt. served as pip f peace in the hands ofthe fierce and swarthy warriors. They are of sand and limestone excavated and reduced to form by friction and the intervention of sand and water.- A number of fine 4i coidal.8oncs used in a came calied chiihke to whisk the early In dians tcek a deep interest form an interesting study Cbungke was their great gambling game and had about the same effect as draw poker has u the average "sport" to-day History tells of many a poor brave who staked his all en the game and baying lost ended his life a suicide. 5he stones with which it was playfd a number of which are comprised in the collection are circular in shape with diameters varying from one to ten inches. They are from pus fourth to two and .one-half inches thick and are hollowed out on each side. "The-game was started by hurling the stone end then spears at it as it flew. The one whose spear was. nearest' the stone when it lit or who'struck t counted. By far the most interesting feature .of the en tire collection are the samples of..Indian pottery. The southern Indian excelled all other known tribes in the manufacture of pottery. Kettles .vases pot for holding oil water and cthercurposses and of the greatest value were made by them. The patter's wheel was unknown and their pottery was made of red blue and yellow clay worked by band and dried by the fire or id the sun. One of .the finest sptcimepsjs a urge .pot shaped like a modern Kettle and winch has evidently been used for cooking. Another perfect specimen is a flat-bottomed jar with a very narrow neck covered'vith. circular and bead ornamentations It. resembles closely a Greek vase. It is very delicate/and its cam- Eletion must have made glad" the heart of the Indian woman by wham ita.wrought. Another fine specimen is a'gmall cap made of red clay about the size of A teacup with a handle on ihe ide. and Shaped .very mncfc like tW square teacup now 'considered fashionable. There we number" of other fine aped- mens in tbejbape of iar3/ugi b wh and pots. Mr. Ifc&Iftiban' BSD devoted im eft tie to the collection of petrHedWooi oysters and .vn.ala- voW na TTAT Sn T1lA k' IHfl- catalogue of his work but died suddenly Before doing so and it is thwe fore impotsible'for any but an expert to tell "the locaiWyriyhere'rnaay of thomost interesting relics .were- found. .They/all aine how- ever frbn the Indian mounds In the northern psrtif the state The collection from It extent and value has attracted considerable attentioa re nlyi Mdit isnndfjitood .that. t eflort Till be wade to the Georgia His torica Tbe ElB on ii4htiio iiy Shoals. i'projee Wfoot idrbUiI4 from Elberton to Anthony Shoals. The plan 'The Scientific Wondeifnl tare sreafest If correct agree with period o 'globe It may lhe waves is his areas when by leased I refer phenomenal. bas he to time Bible chamber joy equal proach fading attest as the a most restoring health His of a the earth. built up country but scientific Professors in the tounded. the modus does he continually giving making diseases well Hill. medicine Flower antagonized taught practice but rendered as a but not mcdlcalf bad been ities that my heart not only pain How of disease approaching f mothers horrors prostration and am me know I bare Dr. R. frequently home I have the wonderful The with First better be can rons as to read t loon as ever Second patients strongest blazes Voter He supernatural in hazed incurable Dr the has sad go them joy sag all and in so fen rill is almost Sense au Hyde helped "I have" miles cousin to the teal as things resort prolong have They ed I paralyei stomach kidneys. 'you troubles for Then few have bad. tongue tries "Great hiving face know TAnd Insects from But been 'tongue have mucous muscles. tion oi lungs TiatiOB ties many known you thU Wei believe .r P.i\ sores Jron' Mt. o E > ure N. . 11. wk 00. we"wish HotDD ATi. fUR jl Ftom. the . G 1fiir' oJl 'ot. th .m Jn re g .and'ya.J I e o1 Uonioplldi8.ttreliel probably. In'ex. JwiJt&-t1l'W hel'eJi Ulelo' tlr is in wn o.Mn":1darycJ. cG4s1wtt .idaW f he J..t 'JohJk)1tGlathan .wid e& on .JOIlt4 UldEaaLnroad J9r'thhtJ" jeAf Mr.J. G1u derg ise1 ir ltdI.or earl bdi J01fatoiyand.he J d nl relics a d TeIlaj lIew. Ol h1 j d and i&a Ume.delr- . gjnt thIn.dln moundJJn neigh r. ol.M coJl 'Il 'tt.t out raFu. AO imnthaliod iUiU. 'e hQxxloll ra. 11 hlShat1ii the reSults' or'h r' hu6 I d' tndrjJ1t\i rMUg UOIl .Tbee l J nJv J J1Jin i .us. lftun.t.t 1.Y :11. cs.tao e.and.a.la ftli' Tthef ii'n Uili1g Jo indi th puiod.ohia 'W1i blt fposell'1hicli th curiouir o ii'.pa. ularly'ricbinf4'row Jiead8.t 'Eyeryftno Jorm sad f1l de r ed the.lputbern re re8 nted.TJ1e ndi8.nlwere dependl D li1hoU8o r arrow for proYiai I18 f und implemen\llsed by apeC 11cna in colecti01l. fiintJaiper viol a d 8Jnokyquaru l. .hel.dor' untilevell. co ld embr 1cedin Thereare lsoa rlete fpec eDs place5wber carn d on 8 pear on as e' T e 01 Mo t .p ar e ashck.accu1l1ulated tbe'.coat th r countryo ou\ ed kers. collections bee lf Lc unced b the sub- ct ftuv st l'llcl'ti n green tone fhH rit Th ateolu.x cf to. dBY mt sUluces haves. cente. rfor- orna mcnt llu llberof celhare th or were used im are'circular m nip ul&ted'WUh ! l' are-made agat .l.Jld wer llaed lengthand et cl.ed e51 maoris the. tion rr..CD 11lr doubt- llpel If of the ri nd fric on iuterve ion waler. l1t n er ne ids.18tgM9 chuh ke In- tu man h yin wrthwhich' a collection-arc vary ing thi k 'Ihe aD e sre r wa if m t entire ar ; celled of. pot. fo cther'i urposaes p Uer'a wa.sunlmown i be spfcim pa ja,8 I rge ot ah pe.d h en forcoo.king Darrow eiraularand delicate and pldion laa r wh lhva vrought. .A.n- .cl y ol.p. h ndle Ih.ide.andilhaped.very ntuc tt cupnow rge Dumootof-otherfine iDt lt ba PO bq 1 m elUW- t e p ct on petrified' ood .ar.imaJa"'remaine. 'loha.dintendedW Ire- pare a l8eripU\ hiavll'k l1t ied .udd nJy efore ing1Of and.it.is. t &te .foreimJOf. .t telt. eloc JXlI feh a. we e. < 'P.1ey alHame fromth l1ndj-1a part f.thut le. U ctiPvfrQm' : A attraetedeongdefa"ble end it it f1'o 1'f'nrbe' n .d t purchase tbt'hr-theG\orgfa torical'6JCie y .Ot.lh Tel olr ae TbeJ.r ktODall 'inthoDj'8'h is FtOJn'tbe'lJh e t here'I a.-pr j if o\t bniI\ta f 1 t . Antb llr SHoilil'j1e t 'II-V .n. U the tave'eYelJr tmh ' fest Itthes .thewave are bf 01 it'Dis It en t1tic I d ba onl 6prin o g n fUi f nll Its l i 'sc8m is the hel Cd tn tlJ i. theU I ve ! tlonof bnnhnd .t i lI "W I lid that tellUon .mu. 'ul yi erroni a Soaos s Utwatna Yuiitbe Iud1n)1jand. ot Nsrlia UogI .Fron &vanuab0Ga.ewa. ofthe and. colieetiA of Indian relics ia cx- Inthesouth isin possaulon of-Mrs. Mary J. -McG1uhansidov. of'4he Jtne sad 1ia. the iubjcl andent montb. thelndian Ms on state. 5- 'S A ramjn thepiodeat little home of is to investigationL eat. ieti n which a eaaogue5 now1edgo ofhistory-whiels urposes of wue orused oaths use pllucid nd ceulcido also Georgiaand shapeand o in fortheaitdle. ofthe nuniberofvery orilat. seasseirca- withoathantilee. af in fornany moodohaving fire pipes S. 4iecoidal.stpnco same discsjcok interstform avevae many he S andcther ofthe nd id.the doestspecixntpsisa iss sizoLa Ihe.'eide the thapt bowls MeGitehan wch .srooci animals' rcvsains. 'lie had intndad to a4iBCriF'tivO itia impoasibbe for were ite relenIy an i either f-jr. the society Of the TeilairU&ttaniy. From tbeLfncolntonGL1lewL. C a prbject on foot te haUl a taiiron.1 S S S Wend S lithe hi as ehamberhas It. ha b 'tn ' . ; - . - , - : ' - , ! ' , : ¬ , - , , . , , . : ¬ . . " . , . , . . ¬ , > , ; ! . " . " . . : * . ; , = ' ' - . ' . , . . - - . * , * . ; , " , : . . ; , ' , ; " * ' " ' ; , > > * ? " " * * " * " ' " . - * - * " . - - , . < ' ! " , . ' . ' * ; - ; ' ; , , ; , . , ' > , . " , ; ; ; ' . ' ; ' : . : - ; ' . . " , ) : . - , , . , . , ' * , , , , > * , * , - . , : . - , - . - , . - , . , ' ! ! - . - . . . , , - ' - , { . . . . " " . , . - , ¬ . " " - . . . . ¬ , . , , , , , ' ' " , ¬ . , - . - , , , . - . ' , . " " " " " ¬ . , , , - ¬ . , - ; - ¬ . . . . , , , . , / ' * . , , . _ . . - % . . { | , ¬ , , " " - ; - , ' , . , . , - . - , . " - - . . ' , ' [ , . , . . . . : . , . , * , . . ' , , . . . ' ¬ . " - , ' . * . . / - _ " , * $ . . ¬ ' , , . . , ' , . / . - " / } ? < ? . . & ! > , . * : . * - * > ! * | ' ( > ( < ' * - , , , > , ' * " , ' ¬ . - . . / , - , " , * , , ' . ; ' - ' ? , , ) : * - ; ¬ * > * ; . ' : " ' ; % , , ' , , , , , , . : , . . , . . , " , , ' , , . ? * . - " ' , & ; } ; " . . . ; \ , , ! . ' . ! / ' . : \ . , , : " , \ . ' . , ! . . - " . . . . . ' . . . " ' . . . . . \ ; . ' . . . . , ' . . . : . ! ! , : . ; . . : & ' ' ' , - ; ( . " . . ' . : ! . ) , . " ' ; ' . . & ; ; . : . - . - ? ' " , ! . . , , ; , ; > , . , } ) . ' . ! . , . . : . & , ; . : . , < ' ( . ' ' ( ' \ ; ' ' ; ' ' : - . ' . . . ' . . . ; < : ) : ) . $ : . ' ; ' ' , , \ . : . " . . ; < . . . ' . : . } ' . . , . . \ & ' , ; , ( . ( ' ' ' . ' , ' ' . ' : ' ' ( ' . . ' : ' ' > : ' ' . . . ! : ' . . . \ . ] - , < \ . : . , ' ( . . ! ' . . . } . . . ' . \ ' . ( ' . \ ' / ; . . - ] { : , ! : . ' ! ) ( ( } ' ( > > ' , . ( ( ' . ' ( ' ( , ' ( . > ( } ' , . { \ > ' . ( ' : ( , - \ { \ , . . , , . . " } ' : ' ' : & ' . ' - ; . . . . < : ] : _ : - . ( . . ( . : , { ( . , ! - : ' : . ' . . . < . ; . & \ . \ : . . ' . , ( , \ ; ' . - - - . ( . ' > " - ' ' ' . . . : . ' ' > \ \ ' ' : . ' . ) . ! ; \ , , ) ) . ( } , . : ' } . - ) ' . . $ . , ) ; , . . ( ' ! . . . ! . : . - ! , ' ' . ' $ . . \ : - , , , ' . ' . ! : . ! \ . , ) . ' . , ( ! . . & ! . . $ . ' . . . . . % } . , , . ) . ( : ] , ' ; : ' , , - - ' , . . - . ' _ , ' " ( . \ ' ; : . . ' ' ' : . ( ' ! - \ - . ' { . , , . , . . ' . . ' ' ' ' ( . ( \ \ ; ' . . ; . ' ; : - \ ! \ : ; ' ; , , ! ' , . - " ' - . ' ' ; . ; . " . " ' . = ; . . . " . . : ' , ' . . . ! ! . : ' } , . ' , , ' ; ' \ ( ; : ; , . ! : ! , / : . . ! ' . : . . . ' ' ; . " . : . . " ; ' { " ' . . - \ ! - - , - : . ' - _ _ _ _ * ) . , , . ; . ! ; , , : - - - + : - . & . . . , . , - . - , . ' . . , ! . . . . . - : & - . , . - . ' - - - ' ' . ' . . * ' ( : ' , . - , . . * - . ' - - ' - ' . , , . - ' ? - - - ' . ' . . . . . ' ' . ! - , , . . - ' , - ! . ' , , ; . - & . , . ¶ - . . ; ' . - . . ! . . ' " ' . - . . ' . - "

Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 18 Feb 1885, Wed,
  3. Page 418

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  • AtlantaConstitution2-18-1885p418-McGlashan

    dantelliott – 12 Dec 2016

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