Langan

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Langan
 - revolutionary times Barbara and David Ungan...
revolutionary times Barbara and David Ungan look like they just stepped out of a history book in their costumes recreating the dress of a woman and a soldier in the times of the American Revolution. Parade route set The friends will present their first Memorial Park Muster and Eighteenth Century Outing. Fife and drum music, a staged battle and two mutinies will suppjy some military fervor during the day. These war-like pursuits will give way Saturday evening, when area residents will be invited to a "courtyard ball." It sounds like another costume extravaganza, designed to give people an excuse to run around outdoors and see their friends. This, however, is only part of it. Barbara and Da"id Langs! 1 , the masterminds of the weekend, are ap- piuaching the festival with complete seriousness and professional intensity. The Langans, who live in Blue Island, are members of a five-state historical society called the Northwest Territory Alliance. Alliance members, who are both professional and amateur historians, get together frequently and stage festivals like this one. They not only have fun and see their friends; they achieve a sort of fantasy transformation of the everyday world . Mrs. Langan talks about one of the first to her. The Langans' slant on things is similar to that of many theater people, with one difference. Their attempt to capture the eighteenth century" is grounded in a commitment to total authenticity. The clothes the Langans, their children and other "participants will wear, Mrs. Langan explains, are not costumes. They are authentic replicas of the garb worn by Revolutionary War soldiers and their camp followers. "You can just about see them going down the road in a cloud of dust," Mrs. Langan says. "We were a dirty, bedraggled lot." Accordingly, the women in the camp scenes will not appear in farthingales and three-foot, powdered hairstyles, but in what they might have worn on the road. We can expect coarse cloth dresses, old cloaks that belonged to their husbands, shoes made of rags "We won't be that dirty, but we won't be pretty," Mrs. Langan says. The Langans are not professional Council names Klein to replace Greves historians, Alliance because of Langan's interest in making guns. A cabinet-maker. Langan decided a few years ago that he wanted to build his rifle. He found a group which was doing the same thing, but was dissatisfied because the members were more interested in shooting than in craftsmanship. It was at this point that he saw a newspaper article on the alliance, which mentioned that "soldiers" in the group usually made their own suns. " The full soldier's uniform is quaint but elegant. Mrs. Langan reports that the only unauthentic thing about them is "the percentage of wool in the fabric. The originals were 100 per cent wool. The alliance permits members to use cloth of 70 per cent wool. Langan's red coat (he appears as a British soldier; has blue and white trim, tails that fold back and are held in place with heart-studded clasps, and lOj buttons. The latter are hand-cast in pewter from original designs. The buttonhole lace on the cuff is imported from England (the right stuff cannot be- found anywhere else). And those soldiers whose rank and/or bear. The men in the alliance proude most articles of their own costumes Men are encouraged to sew their own coats. Mrs. Langan feels rather strongly that men should at least sew on their own buttons. "The more of those things you sev. on yourself, the more you appreciate what an awful job it is," she says, severely. The Langans at home say they "feel as at the campsite of an alliance gathering as we do elsewhere." They describe the alliance as a "floating community" in a five-state area. The outing will feature a full eighteenth century military encampment, w i t h soldiers and camp followers cooking on open fires. The Langans say they are trying to "recreate the period from 1775 to 1783. to show what life would ha\e been like in a military camp in Illinois." People coming to the ball Saturday e\enmg will not have to worry about the authenticity of their costumes. While guests are encouraged to come in costume, no one will be checking their garments against period illustrations in books. The Blue Island City council voted Tuesday night to accept Mayor Harry Harczak's appointment of William N. Klein as alderman. Klein replaces Paul Dennis Greves as the 1st ward alderman. Greves resigned from the council to accept a position with the Blue Island Police department. Klein is the owner of Klein Elevator feed store, a long-time business in the city. The lot of street work could be done all over the city of Blue Island," Heckler commented. "I'm tired of hearing about things being looked into." Aid. Russell "Dale" Elton (7) said, asking about a number of projects in his ward. "I want some action." Aid. Andrew Botte (7) commended the fire department's waterball team for taking first place in a recent competition. He

Clipped from
  1. Blue Island Sun Standard,
  2. 30 Jun 1977, Thu,
  3. Page 1

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