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union - Senate Racket Pro hers Resume Union Hearings...
Senate Racket Pro hers Resume Union Hearings WASHINGTON W)—The Senate Rackets Committee today called in a group of New York City workers workers to show how, they allegedly were .exploited- ."by. hoodlum-run unions and cooperating" employers. Chairman McClellan (D-Ark) said in advance it would be shown that "sweetheart contracts" between between the unions and employers gave the workers only the legal minimum wage. Today's hearings are a new phase of the committee's probe into New York area unions dominated dominated by labor racketeer Johnny Dio, described as a close friend of James R. Hoffa, powerful Teamsters Union boss. Previous testimony has brought out that Dio got the unions started as part of the old AFL United Auto Workers, but since has switched them into the Teamsters Union. McClelkn said Wednesday that Hoffa used Dio to help gain labor domination over New York and the Eastern Seaboard. The committee heard Thursday from Lester Washburn, 48-year- old builder and summer resort operator of Rhinelander, Wis. Washburn told how, as president of the old UAW-AFL (now the Allied Industrial Workers Union, AFL-CIO), he ousted Dio and suspended suspended the Dio locals in 1954 He said those decisions were rescinded rescinded as he was bounced as the UAW- AFL chief. Washburn gave some surprise testimony about the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, whose President David Dubinsky has been considered a leader in efforts to rid organized labor of racketeers. Dubinsky is a member of the AFL-CIO Ethical Practices Committee Committee now considering rackets charges against" other unions, Washburn said Dubinsky gave him no help in ousting Dio, although although urging him to do so. Asked about Washburn's testi- mony, Dubinsky told newsmen "1 will not engage in a debate with Washburn." Dubinsky said he would be "glad to testify" if the committee wants to hcan-bim. ,* Washburn also said"'Diibinsky'& own union once assigned Dio to help organize a Roanoke, Va., plant which the ILGWIJ hadn't been able to unionize otherwise. Dulles Places Western Plan for Disarmament Before UN LONDON Ml—U. S. Secretary of State Dulles, in a bid to revive lagging disarmament talks, placed before the U. N. subcommittee subcommittee today a Western plan to guard against surprise nuclear attacks. attacks. Officials had disclosed beforehand beforehand that it provided for a globe- girdling inspection system, linking a "limited open 'skies" observation observation plan with ground inspection posts in Europe, Russia and North America Primarily American in origin, it had been endorsed in advance by Britain, France and Canada, Western members of the five-nation five-nation U. N. subcommittee on disarmament. disarmament. Russia is the other member. The 69-year-old American Cabinet Cabinet officer decided to present the plan personally in an effort to lend emphasis to the proposal. By replacing Harold E. Stassen, Stassen, the U. S. delegate, at the subcommittee s e s.s i o n, Dulles brought the weight of his own au- thority and that of President Eisenhower's Eisenhower's to the table. 11 was a climax to a whirlwind five - day visit to London ordered by the President. The "open skies" proposal for aerial inspection of each other's territory by Russian and American American planes originally was made at the Geneva summit conference in 1955 by President Eisenhower. The idea for international ground inspectors at key ports, rail junctions, frontier areas and airports came first from Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin. Before flying back to Washington Washington tonight Dulles was to make a television and radio broadcast to Britain. Today's Chuckle "There's one thing sure about Eustice," said a luncheon club member after a long meeting. "If there's nothing to be said, he'll always sa/ it."

Clipped from
  1. The Ludington Daily News,
  2. 02 Aug 1957, Fri,
  3. Page 1

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