Emily Chisolm letter to Chisolm Monument Association

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Emily Chisolm letter to Chisolm Monument Association - Mrs. Chisolm's Letter Relnter ring the Remains...
Mrs. Chisolm's Letter Relnter ring the Remains bf the Loved One8 Killed in Mississippi' WASHrcrGTON, March 2D, 1879. My Dear Fkiend: One month from ui-iiMV ui-iiMV ui-iiMV unu. lwi Tears yv nr uaia vvi wi.vtnMu vuau u iuv u".T-"ii u".T-"ii u".T-"ii -nee -nee :'p6 terrible i sti&f April, ,iefmetery itself wou 1H f , , number be Jine J?al hearers that there would be a monument monument erected, and bade them note the moral it would point. It was said that notwithstanding.the inclemency jot t"T day, people era gatheredN4h irca' n or iweive mues, ana x near a ft. izui since me icrriuie u yi y.VT. 2 mi. fi.D., j j Pulluvso uv: utTrZr-l utTrZr-l utTrZr-l tolanteered their attendance, Preoedug Khat sunny Sabbath, jestingly, or threat-' threat-' threat-' ts precj003 Remains, playing" a sol- sol- eningiy.'aCCOrumg lO tUCir :,wwu, vii cuiuijr oCCu uuuo. .v iuo 6io noio the "black Sunday" In ; answer to gathered a great "number, and after the your kindly request that I snould write parth taie inlo her -bosom -bosom those. w,ho you when I succeeded in btinging aw- aw- fa jiear JtAallf who love patift'tfcmktfd me remains OI m V nusuauu wu luh- luh- ucvuuuu. x muuud ioio uduaui. I so-called so-called so-called "best' citizens 4 of -Kemper -Kemper j to me;r conntrr's friends which prompt- prompt- county," Miss., I now; ddresa you. ,r j ed all this. I did not hope to, remore I For weary months I have planned my aear ones 10 a sweeier spoj ior uw and been disappointed in my hopes till the stfrig would trill forth a my heart grew sick,J)ut on-the on-the on-the 4th of softerihelody, or that' the flowere abore the, present month I received from our J them would shed a sweeter, perfume. true friend, Mr; Charles Eosenbaum, a It was not tnatne place wnere wey V a . m 1 J T . A. I Itrili T O 1 AfWOTVl : TO 111 n WW TTl n Trim! I 1 M I I I Ifl-ail Ifl-ail Ifl-ail KHII I. 1 "v : by many ties. . Others dear to me sleep 1 J eiprcaa., xurco ujf8 vu.D there ; near py is tne pleasant couage 1 w M 4 tuCy weio - 1 V .c. m J - ! . ' . , ' . I ' . ; I ArAn nntlnH ThSOA nfll TIC W'flPfl in . I ciosea in Doxes unea soldered, and the occupant was written , thereon. These Z ' ill' LLiJ -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, -i:-iA.l:iiUi-;!, - - aeians were very graieui w wc.. . I left Washingt6n;hVlniofning' of the 5th of the 'present; month; passing through Harrisburg, where ;. my : son Clay joined me, i and . we proceeded. to Lock' Haven,' the county seat of Clinton county, Pennsylvania -Here -Here wo were met by Mr. J. C. Sigmund, of the. town of Salona, which lies in a rich yalley between two raountain ranges, about five miles from Lock'Haven. I My kind friends advised ine not te attempt the meeting with those, my beloved, who are called dead; but with me; in my thoughts awake, and .-. .-. .-. in my j dreams asleep, they are always' present, and I felt that next to meeting theni in heaven, heaven, I desired to be with theni once more on earth. : All nature ' was robed in spotless snow, aaif in emblem of their own purity. The mountain-tops mountain-tops mountain-tops , on every side pointed upward, 'and the eyef-gTeens eyef-gTeens eyef-gTeens on their sides reminded me that heaven is eternal. I need not fell you of the graceful welcome extended by Mr. Sigmund's family and the friends of his household who were there. -You -You can easily perceive that those who had so generously proffered me for my friends TX)unsr wife, where were: born Cornelia and'Clav. .All these .''sweet memories rose to bid me let them sleep on undis turbed. But nO, 1 could not let tnem with' zinc and rest in the soil or the. state which, for nninp nt -ftflfih -ftflfih rip.ar two vears nas laiieu even w puu mo asai ot her disapproval chap- pubj- on & crime which appalled Satan himself, - and caused his lesser demons to cry out and hide themselves in horror. ?Toeyjnow rest on a beautiful; hillside, at whoso evergreens the spring-bird's spring-bird's spring-bird's song will trill aboye them. Gentle' hands will wreath fre.h flowers aboye their, breasts, and modest violets and purei white lilies wiU perfurne the air. The rocks on the mountains are fit symbols of the strength of the firm patriotism of the freemen forming the community, and thev will bo the last people to surrender tho battle flag . under which they will be found, ever ready to contend contend for their country's rights. -. -. f . My long letter has now closed, if it conveys to you "the information so kindly asked it is well : , if not take for my apology the great difficulty, for me of; all"others on earth to write a descriptive letter on this subject, which is the one emotion of my lie. , y,ery respectfully your, friend. , - ; Mrs. W. W, Chisolm. 4 - To Mrs. H. , C. Ingersoll Secretary Chisolm Monument Association. to- Bosco- j a of In its as of an see tho to in Tho Aspects of tho South. Tbe Charleston News and Courier has a'correspondent who insists that! th'e the hospitality of a grave among the south will be far better off if the negroes rand scenery of their mountain honre, all leave and their places are filled bt 1 ' . X 1 A. A I I 11 Knew now fo rnepoie,! x t wiatcs. The 2Tem and Courier concurs i Aannnf tall urm rri t.hr. r i or h f I to ri rl - r I '. that even I, who have lived throudn so editorially with this view, except that much, did not die before it was over. it does not "concur "in the opinion And yet, O, my : God I the delightful that efforts should be made "to hurry nappiness oi once more ue ng assemDiea tha nPP-roes nPP-roes nPP-roes out of the south. " It doea " tfj .i !' ' L an unuroKen iamuy circle unuer the same roof -my; -my; husband, myselfCor nelia the first to. awaken parental love in our hearts, Johnnie, the first sacrifice on me auar or nnai iove-uiay iove-uiay iove-uiay ana Willie. Truly, dear madam,' amid all . - i 1 -- -- my sorrows i always rememoer i am his wife and their mother. I hug it ever to my heart as. the sweetest, most comforting memory, givinjprormse that the Father will not forget mo altogether, altogether, however much I may be called to endure. In the. hours oi the nisht 1 lived oyer the beautiful tweuty years of my married life to the last, and over and again could I hear Johnnie, my brave,; delicate boy, the last words he spoke tome: "Mother, if I leave father, they will kill him I" Ho did not leave him, and, true to his words, the vile not think that the ; p eopl e of South Carolina are prepared for an influx of I thousands of white laborers if they xan get them. The farmers are cot (ready to ive the wages that tho whites expect, nor to furmth them the homes they require. ; , ' It appears from these suggestions that the scTuth begins to realize thefact that the labor of that section sooner or later under, tbe existing hegira must be changed, in its complexion. L. he, ne groes have' been oppressed .until:. they cannot longer endure their oppressions and are bound to seek new homes ""f : ,r' 7 r r" r7 pruieuieu, auu wiiere me exercise ana killed him, first shooting off, with de- de- CXDressioI1 0f a D0nt.ical opinion that lib'eralion,. his hand, and then pierciug mav not be in consonance with that of his white neighbor will be ;free from, persecution and oppression. To secure these ends the colored people -aire -aire breaking away from the - south' and seeking homes elsewhere. Howl soon the end of the exodus will be reached his heart. I heard my husband's last whisper, "Jesus, Father wife, precious wife."" Cornelia's last sweet words as I gave her a white liiy : ''Mamma, you've ' a sick -baby -baby Ibis morning." Again I saw her little white fingers hold it up and whisper, "Mamma, 'now fine I "Yes," said I, "it is the emblem of purity," and over 'and again she whispered whispered the word "pprity." , I 'told her the angels in heaven were not more Eure than my baby-girl. baby-girl. baby-girl. ' She smiled ack! at me, and in an hour God ' had healed her wounds, and made her well in heaven. --ti?-'v --ti?-'v --ti?-'v --ti?-'v '-r '-r '-r "Of the blood of t,he martyrs is the seed of the church,". But it is hard to perceive why the bravest 'and' grandest of men: the fairest; Rentless, moBt fear less of boys; the most delicate, winsome rosebud of girls should , in time ; of 'peace" (?V (anarchy) be called on to die by the brutal hands Of those incarnate incarnate demons who were styled men to die for a. country which" T'does j not see the legal means to punish the guilty murderers" hard for the wi fe and mother of those " three to comprehend . May that God who has justice a3 well as mercy among his attributes environ with his direst curses, the apologists, the instigators, s and, sthe foul perpetrators, perpetrators, of the murder of the five persons who fell victims to their hate oh ;the 29th day of April, A D.a877.; Amen: The morning after my arrival; at Salona I was invited down to the family family parlor; there' I found all, assembled. The son, young Mr. Sighiuhd, read1 a portion of the Scripture appropriate to, the circumstances, , apd, all' kneeling, a lady psesent raised her , soft Wow voice in prayer. The prayer' was not a burden of complaints that the " Lord had -so -so neglected as, us we are prone top often to make, ; but ; seemed , an earnest expression, of .thanks for. all His'mercies. The- The- day "proved . bitter cold, - with a driving' rain direct frbm the north j and .a' -heavy.; -heavy.; snow under foot; yet, when? all. repaired ..o .the Methodist Church about 10 o'clock, the large house was full. Irr 2 the', pulpit were the pastor, the Jev. L. G:1 Heck",' the Rev. R. H. Fletcher, tho 'Rev; Mr. Diven, and . the Rev. .L. L.; Haugha-waut. Haugha-waut. Haugha-waut. r .The Rev. Mr. Diven was .the. principal speaker. ' He" recapitulated many of the facts' paid- paid- beautiful tribute to the patriotism, of the father, the -filial -filial devotion of the son,, and. the J wonaenui igye 91 ne aaugnier, wnicn overcame, every serine pf natural timidity and made her forget self and gladly die for her i father, xl remember. he thanked the r man t who , made it it is impossible to- to- tell, but under the feclling Of .wide-spread .wide-spread .wide-spread dissatisfaction that comes of a sense of deep wrong it is not probable that the flood will be materially checked until the fountain is exhausted. - - L 1 . Then n white population must fill tho vacancy, if it is ever filled,' for the , teegip will seldom be found 'turning back to the scene of his former oppression oppression and ostracism. Then the south will be more solid, politically, than it 1 ever has been, though the measure of its political strength in the government wnl be largely reduced in the scale ot representation. No citizen - imbued with Republican sentiment can live in the south any more than the, negro, for the ostracism, that ' has forced . the negro out of that section is for political I opinion sake, and would be as merciless toward the white as the black Republi can, i ' Under these circumstances only democrats can hope .to .be received there in the future with : respect,, and toleration. Those who emigrate from th.e hbfth and west into the southySfiii be; regarded as carpet-baggers, carpet-baggers, carpet-baggers, i! and; must endure all. the "prejudices that attach to that class. rvi;; it I. i- i- r. h 1 rlhe Charleston - News and ; Courier threatens ''vigorous retalliation-on, retalliation-on, retalliation-on, the, part of the "state should any number of convictions follow' the 'pending 'in dictments in the United States Courts for violations of the super visbrai' 'law, as it is, termed." The Democrats bull doze to the last. . Let the state retaliate; it will enly advance the ends of iustice. The News and Courier fbllowa its threat J with the innocent remark that ' the policy of the present administration, as ot the Hampton: administration.' is ar policy j pf amnesty , and peace! f,Pre cisely; that is what is supposed. . Hie! JiepubUcan.? now' m ; prison and in .duress under the. policy of amnesty and peace 1 inaugurated by Hampton can explain that. " " : - - " 1 r The New Orleans Times, ,m noticing j ti,onai convention in -that -that .city, says : " Vve fear that" little good can "be "ac complished by the- the- convention, if the members of the dominant party L allow themselves to , be . controlled by the ppssible they could find a rest in ' the cu3 dictation," The dominant party is midst of their neishborhood : and In 'the Democratic, and - the 1 convention: the name of the 5 cbmniuntty t 1 large bade I both s the fildead r and ihe -Uvihg -Uvihg members of ray hosband'4;, family welcome welcome ia, their midst j asured his wlas.called in party t interests !? fThe caucus-will caucus-will caucus-will make thp cgijstltution, andJ ;V as the, Times fears, little good ' will Tbef.t accomplished. l ' V 1 .'- .'- O f' l,

Clipped from The Wilmington Post04 May 1879, SunPage 2

The Wilmington Post (Wilmington, North Carolina)04 May 1879, SunPage 2
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  • Emily Chisolm letter to Chisolm Monument Association

    HollyBohl – 23 Jan 2016

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