Clipped From Kingsport Times-News

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 - U.S. South Viet Nam. "The there have increased...
U.S. South Viet Nam. "The there have increased in strength - initiated military I backed war effort. RAIN-SLICK dition. tol treated jury van received tiple Ft. government been navy Brews In Birmingham CAB TREED -- Jim Cox parked his foreign car near Healdsburg, Calif., Saturday to go deer hunting with a companion, Jeff Butts. Suddenly the parked auto rolled downhill with the deer hunters in hot pursuit. They (AP Photofuc) treed the vehicle in less than a minute. The car hit an embankment and bounced into the branches of a tree. Jeff contemplates how he is going to retrieve the auto. It Could Be A Cold Winter For Some The 17-year-old mother of three small children needed help from someone. Her husband recently was in a tuberculosis hospital and her parents, who were financially unable to help her in the first place, have left the state. Left to her own resources, she turned to the Salvation Army for help, and found it. Captain Elwood Delaney furnished her with three rooms of furniture, minus an electric range and a method of heat. She will receive a relief check sometime in the next two months, for groceries and clothing. But food and clothing is not enough to keep winter cold from a mother and three small children. This is but one case of the need for heat and something to cook on expressed by the 600-odd families which rely on the Salvation A r m y in Kingsport. Captain Turns Into Double Tragedy CHURCH HILL-When 3- months-old Randall Keith Love became violently ill about 1 p.m. Saturday at his home in McPheeters Bend community near here, his mother Mrs. Dale Love, called an ambulance. While waiting for il to arrive, she also called the baby's grandmother, Mrs. Luna Gilbert Love, 59, who lived nearby. The grandmother called the Eastern Hawkins County Lifesaving Crew in Church Hill and then ran to a nearby store to direct the crew to her son's home. When Due To Carry Out Threat BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) _ Integration leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was due in Birmingham over the weekend to begin plans for what he has threatened: will be « massiv* new desegregation drive. "He will arrive today or tomorrow, I'm not sure which," said local Negro leader. King issued an ultimatum to the steel city Friday declaring that unless substantial racial progress had been made by Monday, he would renew mass protest marches. A similar campaign headed by King last spring resulted in more than 2,000 arrests. City Councilman E. C. Overton called King's threat an "outrage." He said it would undermine "any chance of peacefully settling our problems." Another local Negro leader Rev. J. L. Ware, said he hoped Negroes would not have to resume mass demonstrations. "What it will accomplish, Lord in heaven only knows," he said Ware said he thought the two racial troubleshooters President Kennedy has sent to Birmingham -- former Army secretary Kenneth Royall and ex-West Pdfot football coach Earl Blaik -- art making a sincere effort. "I think (bey should be given time to prove their worth," War* said. Ware said, however, Negroei were not satisfied with the progress being made. "Being happy and satisfied is out of the question," Ware added "Maybe there is a spark of hope, though." The latest Birmingham crisis was touched off by the desegrega- ion of three city schools earlier this month, and a church bombing which followed. Four ysung Negro girls were killed in the church blast. Negro leaders in Shreveport, La., plan to lead separats marches around their churches Sunday in memory of the bombing. Th« separate marches will be in lieu of a mass march that was planned for last Sunday, but was broken up by police before it got under way. New demonstrations were alsa threatened at City Hall in New Orleans, where about 20 Negro students were arrested during a segregation protest Friday. Good

Clipped from
  1. Kingsport Times-News,
  2. 29 Sep 1963, Sun,
  3. Page 1

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