Cincinnati Enq 4 oct 1914

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Cincinnati Enq 4 oct 1914
 - . V 6 SECTION THREE THE ENQUIRER, CINCINNATI;....
. V 6 SECTION THREE THE ENQUIRER, CINCINNATI;. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, SSS ssss Mi- Mi- . - wag mgr r-t r-t r-t By James B. Morrow. Kansas City, Mo., October 3. The free- free- for-all for-all for-all divorce record In Kansas City and. most likely. In the world, is as follows Plaintiff and two witnesses heard. De cree entered. Time: two minutes and . thirty seconds. Therewith Thomas J. Murphy begun writing the facts. They were grave and nortorious facts and he rammed them Into bombs and exploded the bombs right before the eyes and into the ears of the public. Mr Murphy Tim Murphy, every one calls him had been watching and study lng the facts for a long: time. He was a newspaper reporter a slender six-footer, six-footer, six-footer, with a distinguished looking face, fine gray eyes and the cadence of Alabama in his voice. Then one day a bench in the corridor of the courthouse broke down. It was overloaded with gossiping and giggling pe tltloners for martial disjunction. Men and women wriggled around on the floor like worms. Whereupon Mr. Murphy turned humorist, but the story he wrote wasn't altogether ridiculous. Tragedy . crept into the lines. An appeal to the con science of the people crept into the lines. The incident of the broken bench was " funny, but it was also a disgrace. Reform, with fiddling steps, finally . came. The Judges acted. A proctor was appointed said to be the first fin the United States to investigate divorce cases that were uncontested. Men say that to modest "Tim" Murphy , belongs every bit of the credit. He softly replies that he doesn't think so. Mr. Murphy Is still a newspaper man, but he has been promoted from the ranks to a subeditor-ship. subeditor-ship. subeditor-ship. Story of a Chicago Couple. "I was a court reporter," he told me, "and I couldn't help but notice that the number of divorce cases heard in Kansas City was becoming scandalous. The docket was loaded with such business. I ot the names of scores of plaintiffs and then tried to look them up in the city directory, but they weren't there. J soon found that .men and women were coming here from all parts of the country, having learned that"- that"- divorces were easy to obtain In this city. One of the cases I investigated showed that a bride and bridegroom left Chicago on their wedding Journey. Somewhere in Missouri, on the train, probably, the husband husband " slapped his wife in the face. He said it was a playful or Jocular performance. performance. "Indignity is one of the grounds for divorce in this state. It Is a very expansive expansive word and can be stretched to cover anything from a beating to a cross look. I reckon the 'bride was tired of her bargain, ' though she was on her honeymoon honeymoon trip. Anywjr, ahe applied for a divorce after reaching this city and cot It. In leas than a week after - leaving Chicago she -was -was back there again with a decree of divorce in her possession. "Also, Z talked wtth many persons who had been divorced. I made the subject, T7 Tr V Wa Divorce Evil Lead To So Many Do- Do- Investigator Tells of Causes That mesticTragedies and Suggests Remedies Reform Started in Missouri By Young Reporter. -ft -ft ' 'frx i ;-&vi ;-&vi ;-&vi you see, something of, a specialty. I discovered discovered that most of those who had obtained obtained divorces were sorry, saying they had acted hastily or while angry. I am no reformer, but the state of things was disgraceful and, besides, I was positive that if divorces could be checked it would not only result In good to the community, but would prevent a great deal of un-happlness. un-happlness. un-happlness. "I may have helped to call attention to conditions here, but Judge Thomas J. Seehorn opened the way by which it was possible and legal to cure some of the evils that were bringing reproaoh to Kansas Kansas City wherever the facts were understood. understood. A proctor was appointed to inquire inquire into the cases to which there was to . be no defense prearranged eases. mostly, or cases dragged Into our Courts from the outside. "Tim" Murphy's Philosophy. "Divorces, I have learned, are very often the result of a temporary and unnatural unnatural state of the mind. There Js a quarrel or a misunderstanding, which might easily be settled, but which is not settled if the aggrieved person knows that one has only to walk Into the courthouse courthouse and walk out again with papers of separation tn one's hand.' Moreover, divorce divorce proceedings having once been started, started, the person beginning them dislikes to bask down. So anything which makes divorces dlffloult to obtain works for the happiness of individuals and the stability of the home." I 'William W. Wright is the proctor. In reality be is a deputy truant officer of the Juvenile Court, because there Is no law establishing the proctor's office. He Is a very energetic, positive and up-to-date up-to-date up-to-date up-to-date up-to-date man. His father was a Disciple minister, and he, himself, Is a Sunday school teacher. I After five years at the University of Missouri, where he paid his own expenses expenses by playing professional baseball with the American Association during his summer vacations, he came to Kansas City on borrowed money and opened a law office. He was soon in the thick of civic movements and gave his services without pay to the Board of. Public Welfare, Welfare, which inquires into all kinds of social social conditions, including tenements, wages of workers and so on. 1 Independence, and "hot Kansas City, Is the county seat of Jackson County. There are courthouses, however, at both places. Formerly 200 divorce cases were filed at Independence every year. The number has been reduced to 34, and largely by the vigorous action of Judge Klmbrough Stone, son of Senator William J. Stone. Judge Stone is a man of high ethical standards and is working with the eight Judges of Kansas City to stop the divorce scandals which in the past made Jackson Jackson County a byword all over Missouri. The Lawyer and the Lady. "Tim Murphy." Mr. Wright said to me. "really began the crusade which led to better divorce conditions here. He wrote up the situation Just as it was. For instance, instance, he. showed howi a rich woman came to Kansas City from Atlanta and applied for 'a divorce. Some friend told her that divorces could be procured without without any trouble and, with but very little expense. The lawyer whom she employed wrote her three letters and sent her two telegrams assuring her that while the law required a year's residence in the state, the requirement was merely formal and that she could get her divorce right off the bat. j "Events of that sort and . the publicity given them brought matters to an Issue, and I was chosen to investigate all cases In which no defense Is made. Where both the plaintiff and defendant face each other In Court, the facta, of course, come out. Cases which are to go to trial by default are sent to me. I then look Into the situation, visiting the home of the plaintiff and making inquiries among the neighbors. A written report of my investigation investigation goes to the trial Judge and I am permitted to be present when the case is heard and ask j questions of the plaintiff and the witnesses. ' "' "When They Lore Each Other. "During the three years I have acted a. proctor I have learned many surprising things things which the public do not Imagine can exist. In my opinion there are but two reasons' why persons ordinarily ordinarily seek divorce. First, th ere 1 s immorality immorality and a desire of the delinquent to marry marry some one else. Second, there is the purpose purpose of the applicant to protect property interests. I go so far as to say that nearly nearly all those who ask for divorces mean to marry again and have already chosen the persons they are to take in wedlock the second time, or maybe It Is the third or fourth time, because most divorces are repeaters. "The wish for a change of mates. If I may state It that way, is at the bottom of practically all of the divorce business in Kansas City and of every other large place. A lawyer who has been trying divorce suits for years tells me that remarriage remarriage occurred In all of his cases but one. 1 "I am almost ready to declare that immorality, immorality, active or intended, present or prospective, can be read between the lines of 09 per j cent of the divorce petitions petitions which are filed In American Courts. I realise the seriousness of the charge I am making, but I make It. The man who loves his wife, who thinks she Is the only woman in the world, will never have to answer a ctiarge of immorality at the bar of Justice. The woman who loves her husband, who thinks he is the only man on earth, will never be called upon to answer a charge . of infidelity either in Court or outside of it. "As 99 per cent of our divorces are brought about because of immorality, done or intended- intended- to te done, the conclusion conclusion Is Inevitable that there Is a startling lack' of love between husbands and wives. Let me say another thing: The man who Is faithless to his wle loses Interest in his business .and turns out to be inefficient, inefficient, if not a downright failure. The strong, successful characters in business and the professions are moral men. Xeep Out of Booming Houses. "There never was and never .will be an Innocent flirtation on the part of a married married man or a married woman. I employ the word innocent, and I use It without any shading or ; qualification. Hope that Is the politest term I can think of in this connection enters into the flirtations of all such persons. There is gulK In the heart. If no overt act has been commit ted. It will be if the flirtation contlnuea The most Immoral people In a community are the very rich and the very poor. "ji woman. appears and applies for a divorce," Mr. Wright went on to say. "Her name and address are sent to me. I find that she is living In a rooming-house. rooming-house. rooming-house. I take occasion right here to warn poor, young couples "to shun rooming rooming houses. They see 'can rushing, and other " similar practices, and gradually their characters go to pieces. I ask the woman to tell me the names of her ae-qualntanoea ae-qualntanoea ae-qualntanoea . 'I go to my work early in the morning, and when J come home at night I mind my own business.' she says. I have no acquaintances. Don't go to my employer,' employer,' she pleads, because if you do X shall lose my place." I learn that the home she lives in is not respectable, that she has been divorced twice or even five times, snd that a man in the background is waiting until she 'gets her papers.' The woman Is merely a type and cases like hers crwd the ' dockets of our American Courts. "Again, a man gets a family and has hard work In keeping his head above water or his nose off the grindstone. He has no pride In his personal appearance, and luckily for him It makes no difference what kind of clothes his neighbors wear. If he is a weak character he may run away. In that event he ought to be brought back and locked up. If he beats his wife he should go to the whip ping post The strsin of matrimony Is too much for men of his kind. "The strain on a woman comes when she tries to dress as well as the women who live In her' block. She Is shallow, of course, but we must take humanity as we find It. When she goes out she be lieves that the neighbors are looking at her. and they are. She begins to pity herself, and down falls a long line of her personal defenses. A man happens along and In a' little j while she is hanging around the Divorce Court watching for a decree. Bridge and Late Suppers. "A traveling salesman came to .see me not long ago. His wife had sued for di vorce. Hej had given all of his salary, $125 a month, to his family. There were two children, one of them a daughter 17 years old. The wife went to bridge parties, theaters and suppers late at night. "I called the wife to my office. She is a handsome, blond woman. 'I Just can't from; It. but I cant understand now a city man can support a family on $40 a month! He pinches and scrapes, and by and by his little daughter finds a work place, and, pressed by poverty, something something happens. ISuch .matters can't be argued down or covered up. Meanwhile we make It harder for all such little girls by condoning j the offenses of men, who, we , think. Jf f we don't declare It, have certain rights that are denied to women.' I i ' " - . : ! ' A Boycott Against Men. i "The double standard of morals Is also the cause of a great many divorces, and the women, themselves, by their treat ment of unclean men. are largely respon sible for Its existence. It Is up to them to end It once and for all. The social boycott will do the business. ! "You asked me to tell you about ray experiences and ray convictions," Mr. Wright continued, j"and I am doing; so Just as facts and thoughts occur to me as I go along. Put them together if yoU ban and make a coherent article. Ninety jper cent of the children brought Into pur Juvenile Court forj a' hewing belong to separated or divorced parents. Men should not marry under the age of 25 85 would be better4nd women not until they are 22. M "Mothers-in-law?! "Mothers-in-law?! "Mothers-in-law?! "Mothers-in-law?! "Mothers-in-law?! Well, they have ceased to be a Joke. When active they are dangerous members of society. I have studied them Incidentally since holding the office of proctor. Some whom I have known nagged their daughters-in-law daughters-in-law daughters-in-law daughters-in-law daughters-in-law and taunted them with the boast that their sons could have married girls with lots of money. I looked up a number of the girls with lots of money and found them to be stenographers and clerks. The busy father-in-law father-in-law father-in-law father-in-law father-in-law is not so malicious as the busy mother-in-law. mother-in-law. mother-in-law. mother-in-law. mother-in-law. but he Is a nuisance and often mischievous. "Now, then. I would say in conclusion, each city should have a Court of Domestic Domestic Relations for the hearing of every divorce divorce suit that is brought within its Jurisdiction. The further I go into the subject the more I am of the opinion that there should be no divorces granted except In very unusual cases. Our efforts efforts have helped the situation in Kansas City, but they are not adequate. "I would choke off divorcee almost entirely. entirely. I would have seasoned investigator's investigator's hunt out the facts in every instance. instance. I would work away; until I learned why a divorce is desired. I would put the rich, the well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do and the poor under a microscope. I would tear skeletons out of closets. I would push the woman aside and look for the man hiding behind her skirts. What Mr. Wright Would Do. "Then I would publish all that was learned to the listening world. I would call In the reporters and the multitude. The decree, if entered, should be Interlocutory; Interlocutory; that Is, I would hold the divorced divorced couple up by the necks for six months. That would stop a wedding, and maybe two weddings for the If I had .my own way with the ever. I would absolutely prevent remarriage of- of- the guilty man or long as Injured husband or alive. "At the end of six months have another! Investigation by experts of the Courts. If the facts support-fd It, I would .then make the per-manent. No case would need to by lawyers.- lawyers.- Indeed. I would out altogether. The Judge the testimony of the plaintiff defendant and such witnesses as miht sary. and he would have before reports of the Investigators to the public and would decide on lta merits. "I have known men and women right out of the Divorce Court straight to a minister's house launching on the matrimonial I would tie them up to the dock tight .for at least six months, might keep one of them there if he or she had mightily disgraced Injured the other." . "But surely a drunkard or beater" "I know what you are going Mr. Wright interrupted. "Let call In the police. She Is safer than divorced. A woman is murdered before she Is divorced always happens after the granted." fCoDvHifht. 1614. by James B. TvF j- j- riAjrWarv- s-s s-s s-s SWOT Stiiavkll, stand my asked her husband,' she said, when I to state her side of the case. And that is all I ever got out of her. A woman csri love only one man at a time. If that man happens not to be married husband Is not wanted around 'I Just can't stand him." she will de dare. "I have heard thst sentence, word for word, many times. Digging away for the facts. 1 1 found that some man had told the bjlond woman, with a daughter 17 years old. that her husband wasn't treating her right. Her case was typical, not s lone In Kansas City but everywhere everywhere In the United 8tates. "What we need In this country is a return to I old-fsshloned old-fsshloned old-fsshloned ways of living and to ol -fashioned -fashioned morals. A tttle high school girl In a neighboring town lost her life because of her association with half a dosen boys belonging to well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do well-to-do families boys with automobiles. It Is a terrible story and I will not repeat It, except to say; that society condemned the boys. "I, too. condemn the boys, but back of them I see their ; mothers eating $10 dinners dinners at hotels and I see their fathers standing on the top of banquet tables and hear them making asinine and maudlin speeches. ' Divorces are brewing In such families even unto the second generation. "Another thing. I am no Socialist; far At the club Solly Solomon and Levi Blausteln stood and looked around the main room ' It was empty. Only Sam three Jacks all the time. What do you call that T' "Strategy," said Mr. Blausteln. "Deal XCELLENCT!" I turned from my half-finished half-finished half-finished half-finished manuscript to find him sitting cross-legged cross-legged cross-legged In his baggy, baggy, red trousers behind his pack on my study floor.j'hls dark face wearing a winning smile, his red fez tipped back. He seemed to have slipped In out of a dream; but my housemaid being an African African In the second stage of her evolution. there was. an easier explanation. Excellency?" 'That Is what you said before. What next?" His left hand swept across the pack, which opened as by magic. Excellency, behoia the tnumpn or Persia! 'Tls the rainbow shawl of the East!" j The shawl made a transient glory in the little room, but I shook my head i gloomily. I There would be a riot In my harem!" said. He smiled affably. A flood of yellow sunlight burst from his mysterious pack and overflowed the shawl. "Excellency! Silk from the street by the gate of the Forbidden City. The Em press has its matei" I only sighed and turned toward him the palms of my hands. ! He drew from a cloudy heap a veil of gossamer and cast It open aeove his head where It floated in spirals, his graceful hand half circling beneath It like a fish's tall under a lily In crystal waters. Excelleney! 'Tls the web of the spider at dawn where the breeze ripples run from the grass out into the blue Bos porus!" I moaned as one in distress who My visitor, lifting one hand in warning, leaned forward and noiselessly placed the cat on my table. I did not faint. "Excellency! EfTendi! Touch It not!" I looked up from a close inspection of the toy. for such It was, though well done, to find him pointing excitedly to a little picture on the study's wall that had been sent to me by my Tom, who. after years at Heidelberg, was touring the world. It was a representation of a Turkish scrivener by the door of a mosque Inditing a letter for a veiled houri. She was. stealing time from prayer to commit the same old indiscretion. "Ef-fendl, "Ef-fendl, "Ef-fendl, it Is my brother my very brother!" he lisped dreamily. "Allah is great. We meet again. My very Brother!'1 In a bound the traveler had become my professional professional brother-in-law; brother-in-law; brother-in-law; brother-in-law; brother-in-law; my very professional professional brother-in-law. brother-in-law. brother-in-law. brother-in-law. brother-in-law. Necessarily, I handedhim one of my hands, which he took fervently and laid against his forehead. forehead. There was a tear on it when he handed it back. "And this? What soul conceived, what cunning artist caned this marvelous Jewel?" There were husks on my voice. "Excellency, 'tls a story older than the cross!" "This is better," I said. "Allah has sent you!" Again that happy chi'.d-man chi'.d-man chi'.d-man smile. "Effendl, listen! Six hundred years before before your era, Euxenes, a-Greek a-Greek a-Greek trader, traveied from Phocea, an Ionian town of Asia Minor, to find the black and white ivory combined. Ivory there was In all the great cities of the East, both black and white, but not combined. It was a saying older than the writings of the wise that it carried with it for man. empire empire and the love of woman: for woman, safety .and the love of man. Princes - staked their hopes and kings their kingdoms kingdoms for It. Men traveled afoot searching searching for It by land from Sheba's mines In the South to the White Sea in the North. goodly shipload of arms, wines, all of whi-h whi-h whi-h Euxenes much prized by savage people. falling, he was taken by the chief home, that in the marriage of daughter, which was planned nlng, he might behold the the dress of the country. not. hearing this, fail to take a necklace of great beauty for which vas very acceptable, every respect new to her people. "Now, in this country a curious prevailed. No man mlht ask daughter of his chief in marriage; might know her choice until at wedding banquet she placed in her elected husband a goblet No man might dispute her lift hand against the chosen provoke the anger of the god. "Euxenes sat in silent wonder banquet table when the beautiful entered and, her bright eyes the faces turned toward her. slowly down the room. Presently and, leaning over the board, having fallen on the revellers, goblet from a flagon a portion and replacing the flagon, hand to the goblet. But at this while bending forward, her loosely planned at the throat her fine necklace, there slipped bosom a curious object which, toward , Euxenes, might have floor but that he caught It by movement He would have to the owner with a graceful compliment, but suddenly his the truth. He held In hla, famous black and white Ivory! his feet In great excitement; he could speak, the young a wondering gaze on her face as though in a trance, reached goblet unto him. "Effendl, Excellency! Euxenes maiden stood a full two minutes each other and gaaing into

Clipped from
  1. The Cincinnati Enquirer,
  2. 04 Oct 1914, Sun,
  3. Page 48

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