Peile1884

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Peile1884 - - to for - Its of of in to FAULTS IN TENNIS....
- to for - Its of of in to FAULTS IN TENNIS. Some Common Errors Which Players Should Guard Themselves Against. From Peile's " Lawn Tennis." These are common faults which it is necessary necessary to warn the player against He will do woll to bear in mind perpetunlly the following points: Never apologize by saying you "thought the ball was not going to come over the net;" it is your duty not to think, but to place yourself in such a position that if the ball does como over you can take it Be on the watch against the mistake of not " starting in time." A ball will come over the net and bound and then, and not until then, do somo players make a frantic rush wildly all arms and logs drive at tho ball and either sending It flying out of court, baug it Into the net or give it such an easy return that a cool and collected adversary will demolish it. No player of this description can ever place a ball or, except except by a fluke, give a difficult return. A sprawler Is generally a person whose occupations before he took to this noble exercise were sedentary. He had never played rackots or cricket or he would know by intuition intuition whore the ball was going tho moment it was struck. Now, ladies, do not accuse mo of calling you aprawlers, for, as you will see, 1 have purposely applied the masculine " he " to that class of players. Another common fault is that ot trying to " kill " a difficult ball by trving to send back a difficult or hard - cut return every timo. When you aro " tuckod up " or In a hole tho best and safest return is one tossed high in tho air and into the back of tho opponent's court, thus giving yourself yourself time not only to recover, but to see what your adversaries are going to do. Many players scorn this play and call it an old woman's game, but It Is oftou the only way to win. They, on the contrary, when thoy get a dillicult ball try to send it back hard nnd low with a cut on it, and tho consequence is that thoy bang it into the not or send it out of court SUPEUVISING PRINCIPALS.

Clipped from The Times01 Aug 1885, SatPage 2

The Times (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)01 Aug 1885, SatPage 2
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