Clipped From The Atlanta Constitution

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 - GEN. MIRABEAU LAMAR 3d PRESIDENT OF THE TEXAS...
GEN. MIRABEAU LAMAR 3d PRESIDENT OF THE TEXAS REPUBLIC notion to wrtt a Matujftj f 1W J- nrented Georgian. In response to this demand a rohnne has made its ppearance -within the last few days bearlny the stamp -of the Methodist Publishing house et Nashville Temu and giving to the public the "Life Times and Speeches of 1. Q. C. Lamar. from the pen of Dr. Ediward Mayes. ex-chancellor of the University of Mississippi. Dr. Mayes has performed his task wen. With him the "preparation of the volume ties been a labor of love. Being a member of Justice Lamar's own household. barm 'mrrted his eWest danghtet he toootht word upon this subject I must confess my surprise and regret that the senator from Massachusetts should have wantonly without provocation flung this Insult" At this point Mr. Edwards who was In the chair called the speaker to order by saying that he could not impute wanton ness or Insult to a member of the senate. "I staad corrected. said Mr. Lamar "It is perfectly in order for certain senators to Insult other senators but they cannot be characterized by those who receive the blow Here the presiding officer rapped again "The observations of the senator from Mississippi in the opinion of the chair are not to order" To thia Mr. Lmr replied "Ibe ob Jefferson Davis Is that his exalted charac tar. his pre-eminent talents his well- established patriotism as a statesman as a patriot and as a soldier enabled him to take the lead in a cause to which I consecrated myself and to which every fiber of my heart responded. There was no distinction between Insult to him and the southern people except that he was their chosen leader and they his enthusiastic followers and there has been no difference since. The effect of the senator's language is to fix upon this aged man. this man broken in fortune suffering from bereavement an epithet of odium and imputation of moral turpitude. "See it required no courage to do that ft required no magnanimity to do It. 11 required no courtesy. It only required hate bitter malignant sectional feeling and a sense of personal impunity. The gentleman I believe takes rank among Christian statesmen. He might have learned a better lesson even from the pages of mythology. When Prometheus was bound to the rock it was not an eagle it was a vulture that burled his beak in the tortured vitals of the victim. This magnificent rebuke is regarded as the finest specimen of legislative retort in existence. Hoar was completely silenced. After this Mr. Lamar sent a letter to the desk from Mr Davis which he requested the secretary to read. In this letter Mr. Davis urged that his name be withdrawn from the list of those who were entitled to pensions by reason of their services in the war of 1&2. He did not wish to ha\e bis comrades suffer by having their names on the same list with his own. This ended the debate. Mr. Lamar's epeech became the topic of discussion in all parts of the country. His own people were drawn closer toward him. while even those at tie north could not restrain the admiration which they felt for the gifted senator. A letter from Mr. Davis expressed the gratitude of the writer for the brld and courageous manner in which he bad undertaken his defense. Two or three da . after the debit a vet narrated Mr Elaine ventured to pjcish jjfmar for his Insolence but he found that j mar was more than a match for him. The next senatorial victim of Mr. La- mars eloquence was Roscoe Conkling. of New York. Though a man of pronounced ability. Conkling was somewhat overbearing in his dispositfon and his mannfer was offensive even to the members of his own party. Consequently in his famous tilt with the senator from Mississippi he failed to derive any consolation except from a few personal friend One or two of these advised him to challenge T tmar but knowing that Lamar was a man of fighting proclivities and having good reason to believe that a challenge would be accepted by him these friendly suggestions were not regarded by the New Tech senator. The newspapers of the country discussed the affair at some length giving Lamar the credit for having punished the senatorial popinjay in a manner worthy of his insolence. Of all the senators who were present at the tune of this passage between Lamar and Conkling BO one fenjoyed the Utter confusion mere than Elaine. "Oh. saU b tf oeadmr the steps of tte capital. of 'Ca I" tJ 1s e 4 TS b star p ytng pubUothe rom plll1or ex h&ncellor 3 BeIn m mbeF 41. J'115 ke ba. m In'oa t frclDItassachu etts b otthe senators t He "Th oplnlonoC I To'thla lamU'replSe4 "Dae 'Wu enthu lc .o coura.geto'do It court y. m1 ht o OIJr. letely IWh t o o d ense. de 1.t t M L&mar ext s eloquenoewas MissiS ippl h c 0the5e Lamar wo d gardedby natorswho reprea- DC latter's h. otc. ye I o . .7 1i bns b& stY7 iand b.rti ; LW baying 'Th der I rb they4hls r ck 1ri days Blatneventured La.n his'lnsolence senatorlalvictim except-from no re- af- mcr Oh ti . , * * - . , - , - , , " , . . . . " . . - . . . " & . - ' . * ? ' ; ¬ , , " . , > , ¬ . " . " . " , " : " , , " . * ; " ¬ ¬ , - , - , , ¬ . ¬ , , , . ' . , , . " , ; . . , , , . , , . . , . " . . . . . & . \ . . . ' . . . . ¬ . > ; , ( . . - . . . ¬ . ; . ¬ , ¬ , ¬ . ¬ , ¬ . ¬ * * . " . " * * . . , ! ) " . ' ' ! , ' . ! . . ' . . ( ! , , < & ! . , . % ' & ; , . . ' . . . ' { ' ' = : . ' : . ! . ; : ! . . . : ' , . . ! . ' " . ! . & . : " ! . ) . . ' ' " " . . . . . . ' . ' ' . : : ! . . , . . . . ' ; . . & , . . ' . . . ! ' ' . . : & . . . . . > . . ' . . . : . . ! . ' : ! ! : . . ' . . . . ) ; ' : . . & ! . ' " . ' . . ' : > ' . { . & . ! . : . . ! ! . ' . ' ' , ! & , : . ' . & ! ' . ' . ; ' : ! . ' ' & . - . . : . > , ' " _ . . . _ ' ; . ' ± & . . . ' , . . , . . , . . . , ' . , . . . , & , ' . . . . . : ' . , ' , , * & - - - . - - ' - . - , . . ? ;

Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 19 Apr 1896, Sun,
  3. Page 15

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