Description of the winter of 1944-45 in the Channel Islands

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Description of the winter of 1944-45 in the Channel Islands - an enormous Most rations held until June 1944,...
an enormous Most rations held until June 1944, when the Allied invasion cut off all German lines to the Channel Islands. Until a desperate plea was sent to the Red Cross that winter, islanders made potato bread, marrow pudding and acorn coffee, trying not to starve. "We had swedes (rutabagas) that we made into a soup and ate three times a day," Mr. Le Sueur said. There was no coal for heat or gas for cooking and no electricity. We were down to our last box of matches. We'd go to bed at 7 p.m. to get warm. "It was bitterly cold that winter, and there was a lot of tuberculosis. Children were 3 inches shorter than normal when we were liberated. But it wasn't all grim. We had parties a party for the last day of gas, the last day of electricity. We'd take what food we had and drink calvados (apple brandy) on an empty stomach." When the Red Cross ship Vega arrived at the end of 1944, carrying 750 tons of food fpr the islands, "you could have played a tune on my ribs," Mr. Le Sueur said. The Canadian Red Cross had used clothes and asked me what size trousers I wore. I hadn't bought clothes for five years. We discovered my waist was 24 inches."

Clipped from
  1. The Cincinnati Enquirer,
  2. 30 Apr 2000, Sun,
  3. Page 588

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  • Description of the winter of 1944-45 in the Channel Islands

    staff_reporter – 23 Aug 2018

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