Clipped From The Record-Union

likelife Member Photo

Clipped by likelife

 - \ .iM- ' BLIN<i High \ — the San 18S»>. One San...
\ .iM- ' BLIN<i High \ — the San 18S»>. One San Francisco and I there death : j for, more injury combined. a noble pursuit, ; but when of a few^chemers, ruin of it ! , are ' not i '" the • credulity call " i 1 commis. re- j I ! : of the j 1 come, j without fictitious I prosperity decline ' in bodes ! good serve to j divert i ' tending I to the | permanent every : mud-hen, the , Stock dumped ; I none I j I i ever j recorded With • '■'■ I con- ' I for this j ! j from i pulmonary cer- ! i by j ! so bad I oppor- ■ tunity case of: a make I out. j lives the j glorious as prating about of i Ban j would allow- 1 j largely j responsible disease. sudden ; showers one minute the next, the lungs certainly If not is fatal the other in the coming it was. he ' Yen Yen. asked. "The was the that there less than who are in one form opium were bond of and conscience that any of that, if once they could many sheep constituted there is the extent permeated me to a cheats Uncle perhaps, without is fast to Customs their lingers is, ot course, and duly 1 . ordered sold It is United States the benefit on opium but at auction, i bines* Six are srnfl a: their $2 per pound, ; UticJc Sara $8 of the China man on a telegram amount of from the Walcott, being ■: that going compete confiscation. condemned, by the greater part in securing to restrict Chinese cunning mu'<h for a both for the spread p.i.ss a be publicly the price the majority could 1 would was deprived I ami j by dej your j 1 say that and unanimous. be-1 paper, ' the 1 it is one is , as more seeming Sarah I the ■ desigi the many the cause celelrre. is Mrs. Terry, likebut find it • of her Hill: next 1 will certainly ■ Sarah : and 1 i your i client, i might I and ■ ' 1 i* blazing '; the ! g<^es > may 1 but ' I think t of 1 would 1 - it will s whose virtue a man is soul , the down it is not c on the c house. wordy philanthropy. people will find him, and it is not at all necessary for him to employ bosses to feel the publicpulse ami proclaim his merits. THE ORANGE BOOM. Much interest is being taken in this city in the prospective opportunities for marketing California oranges profitably in the East, owing to the failure of the" Florida crop, and there is no doubt but Florida's loss will be California's gain. But •ur orange growers must not rim away with I the idea that they have a clear field for i any and all oranges, good or bad. They will be called upon to compete with the' fruit of Europe and the West Indies, which ! have the advantage of cheap water trans- 1 portation, and thus the California fruit will be put upon its merits. Ifwe s;>nl only oar best, we will make b> permanent place for our oranges in the Eastern mark is. Those who semi trash will lose nudi ,■ in ihe venture, besides injuring the re;,., ati .11 of Cal- i lfornia as the orange field for the v. orld. A ci:yin<, BHAXX. One ot the causes leading towards the present hard times in San Francisco is the mania for lottery gambling. It is estimated by persons wBo have made a study of the subject that no: less than >:_ > 00.00b per month is sent out of this city to the lotteries in Louisiana. Havana and Europe, of which sum perhaps an average of 30,---000 comes back in prizes, leaving a net drain on this city alone of £170,000 per month. The hard times have no doubt tended towards the spread of the lottery mania, but the lottery mania has had the effect of making the hard limes harder, by depleting our circulation of to much money. The police department baa set its face very strongly against gambling, it will nut permit a faro-game to be conducted, and wd be to the venturesome sport who shouM attempt to trot out the tiger. Sometimes it is seized with a virtuous spaspi as regards lotteries, and then an agent or two is "pulled" up. his tickets confiscated and a few dollars' bail forfeited as a penalty. This the lottery dealers look upon as a sort of quasi-license fee exacted from them for the privilege of selling the tickets. There is scarcely a barber shop bootblack stand, cigar stand or cheap tailorshop in the city in which these tickets are not kept for sale, and numerous agents go from house to house, from store to store, and office to oifice, peddling them. The newspapers, in open violation of law. encourage the swindle, by printing the lists of numbers drawn, and cock-and-bull Stories about lone widows capturing the capital prize, thus exciting the minds of Ihe credulous and causing them to put hard-earned money into the swindle. All gambling is bad ; but the gambling passion is inherent in human nature, take whatever form it will, and is irrepressible, lint. t > come down to ihe po'it'cil exmomy of gambling, it were better for the community that one hundred faro games should be in operation dan that one Louisiana lottery should receive the immense patronage it dnes in this city; for. in the lottery case the money leaves the country, and in faro iind similar gambling, the money remains and circulates in the community, even the most virtuous tradesman or property owner getting a share of it. lam not upholding gambling, hut the point 1 want to make is, while the Police Department is so rigid sboul suppressing BITO, it might exercise a portion of its zeal in stamping oul the lottery business, and then, if it had a few moments spare time, it might pay some attention to the numerous vile dive-; with which the city i; nil but overrun. THE CHINESE QUESTION. Another Way to Manuge It— Measure It ivi'.li the Golden Kule. [The lIKCORn-l'NioN, which maintains views regarding the Chinese question opposed to the tenor of the following letter, believes in free, lair and full discussion of the question. The following communication is therefore accorded space, for if the position we adhere to, in common with the mass of the people, cannot bear criticism it should be overthrown. The writer of the letter we know to be a worthy, calmminded and valued citizen, and we can vouch for the integrity of the norn de plume he adopts, since he has taken punishment as " one of the boycotted." — Ens. Kkiobd-Vnion] Eds. Ueoibd-Union : " All men are born free and equal, and arc endowed with certain inalienable rights ; among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." I quote the above words. I mention this fact, fearing some people might imagine I was the author of them. No, lam not. They have been heard often in the Eastern states, and perhaps there are some people in California who have heard them before. Their meaning seems a little difficult to comprehend. A few years ago there were very many people who thought that the word white had been left out by some mistake, and thai liiby did not include the black man; but 11 wave of events — which were neither intended nor foreseen by the controllers of public policy — swept over the country and proved to the world that they did include the black man. Now, there are many people on the Putu ßc coast who seem to think they do not include the Chinamen; but 1 believe the great United American bean has accepted their full import as an eternal truth, which should apply to every inhabitant of the United Slates ot North A,iiieriea ; and there are s line iiin.'iu US with iriewa so broad that they would include every inhabitant of the world. 1 admire such men ; but ihe iact that there are nice an ipathies, which are not conducive to harmonious commingling in iiiti i..:i ■ - relationship, seems too palpable to ;> d -:e:teii . and il is also evident thai difference in language is a non-conductor i.. ( perfect harmony, and the question of whether it is best or not to give the words their broadest scope 1 think may safely be left to the wiser heads of our representatives in Congress, who are not deficient in either intellect, ability or patriotism, and who ■ire, perhaps, the peers of the statesmen of any nation on earth. They have already, by treaty and enactments, checked the influx from ( 'hina, and some among us think it would be equally wise to check the in flux from some other countries, because the advantage for bettering their condition which oar country offers to outside people render us more liable to be Overrun by undesirable foreigners than any other country on the face of the globe, excepting Africa. To any one high enough to take a> bird'seye view of the events of the world this might appear, at first glance, like adopting the policy ut some barbarous and halfcivilized people which we, with some Other civilized nations, forced them at the mouth of the cannon to abandon ; but really the circumstances are as entirely different as the different ownerships of the animal which gored somebody else's animal made the case appear to the lawyer when the farmer stated it. in a story found in an antique spelling-book. We are civilized, and they nave no right to feel antipathy to us: while they are no more than halfcivilized, according to our standard, and we have a right to feel antipathy to them. Opinions are influenced a good deal by selfish interests. Those who can utilize Chinese labor or custom to their own benefit can see no better reasons for keeping the Chinese out of the country than exist for keeping other foreigners out; while those who find them formidable competitors in labor, trade or manufactures are quite positive that they ought to be kept out. Others, probably more numerous than both these classes, who do not feel their influence either way. do not care particularly, only their race antipathy and prejudice make them prefer that the country should be settled up by people whose habits and customs are not so dissimilar to ours as to pievent them from being absorbed into our great and glorious nation as citizens. 1 presume there are many who have never felt any fear that our country would be either settled up ?r overrun by the Chinese. In thirty years of unrestricted immigration, with the greatest inducements ever oflered I by any country, only about 75,0>0 or SO.OW I (if I remember aright), by the census, accumulated on the I'acitic coast. while many millions of other foreigners were admitted on our Atlantic coast within the same length of time. Besides the great disparity in numbers, the Chinese, with few exceptions, did not bring families, nor make any preparations to settle .down and makes lifelong residence among as. for which we should be thankful, nlthough some urge this as a reason why they should not be allowed to come at all, and complain that they send their eai nings ont of the country. Other people send their ■•arnings out of the country, and their right to do so is not questioned. That the Chinese leave more lal>or in the country, for the money they send out, than most others, cannot consistently be denied, in face of the great outcry that they da too niucn worK tor too irttle •money. But without discussing the question of whether wisely or unwisely admitted, the fact remains that we have among us some 00.000 (more or ler-s.i Chinese, who seem to be an element of discord. That they have the same right to earn honest wages by honest labor as any other inhabitant, foreign or native bora, very few Americans will deny. To deny them this right would * be brutal and inhuman ; and the, American people are not only human, they are humane. They will not stand peaceably by. and see the Chinamen murdered ; and if they an not to be murdered, 1 hi] to see what benefit is to be derived, by either employed or nnemployed citizens of California, by turning them out of their present employment | That they will be competitors for labor, so i long as they are among us. is unavoidable, I unless we are foolish and wicked enough to , make them ttampe and paupers by denyi ing them the right to earn an honest lir- I ing. It is admitted that they are industrij ous and economical— traita which would he praiseworthy virtues in any of our citizens, but which are alleged against them as almost unpardonable. It is also well known that they are not governed in their demand lor wages, as Americans urc by what they j think they OOghi to earn, but by what they can git. Are white laborers liable to get more work when Chinamen are offering to work for liny cents per day, than when they are working for $1 per day ? Notwithstanding the apparently popular clamor that the Chinese must be driven ont because white men and women are uttering for the want of work, 1 will venture the opinion that as a general thing neither the White men nor white women of California want the situations now occupied by the Chinese, What possible benefit can unemployed men or women of California derive from having a few hundred, or a few thousand, Eastern people brought here, to take the places of as many Chinamen—cigarmakers, or shoemakers. T>r oi any other occupation—who arc turned adrift to compete fox the little labor, the scantiness ••! which is the great cause of complaint '.' There may be a few Chinese employed at one dollar per day i:i work which' some white men would like at two dollars per day, bat the larger portion of the Chinese are doing work which white men and Women of California are unfit for, and do not desire. Perhaps the employer can afford to pay one dollar per day to have the work performed and cannot afford to pay two "loiiars per day. Although many things Influence the price of labor, ability to pay ia an arbitrary limit Much work can be done at oiu dollar per day which cannot be done <t two dollars per day, for arbitrary reasons. ISut suppose the* employer can pay two dollars, is it not askiiu; a good deal to ask more than another will do the work for? and is it not asking a good deal to require a competent servant to be discharged and an mc impetent one taken in his place? It white men and women want the work, and are competent, they have in their favor difference of language, prejudice and race antipathy. Do they also want compulsion? Americans are very jealous of any infringement of their personal rights, and I opine will not long submit to such dictation as who they shall or shall not employ. They may humor it for a little time, thinking it will soon blow over; or from fear of having their buildings burned, or of being boyci tted, or of the displeasure of their nei< bbors—for no good citizen wants the displeasure of his neighbors, even if unjust— but if persisted ia, and there are organizations to enforce such tyranny, there will be organizations to resist it, anil from my knowledge of the American people I will venture the opinion that, to say nothing of the Eastern States, those people in California who would attempt to enforce such dictation would be but a very small minority of the population. Such a state of society is not desirable, and I hope never to see much of such Old-World clannishness here. We have faults enough in our own society without importing more. My sympathies are with the laboring classes, ami particularly with those out of employment 1 can comprehend how desperate a man with a family may become, when, after hunting for weeks and months, he tinds no worki I can see how readily he grasps at anything which promises relief; and how he may even consent to do, what he knows in his own heart is wrong, to others, with the hope that it will benefit his loved ones. Bat I firmly believe that no good can be accomplished by ignoring the personal rights of the humblest, or denying any human being the right to earn an honest living by honest labor wherever he or she can find it. When I look back and see the results of the attempts of the working men of California to better their condition, it appears to me that they neither comprehend the causes ot theirsituation nor adopt remedies which can do them any permanent good. The (comparatively) few Chinese we have among us are not (in comparison) as a spoonful of water to a bucket full. In the port of New York alone from two to three hundred thousand laborers have been landed every year, for an unstated time past, most of whom have very little money, and seek employment from others who have not sufficient for, say, a tenth part of the applicants. There must inevitably be Buffering where there are ten laborers who want the work which is only sufficient for one. If they would settle down on land as fanners they would be a blessing to the country instead of a curse. Probably most of them could not get land /or want of means if they would, and too many would not if they could. Those who are "willing should be helped. Our colonization societies undoing good in a small way, hut Government aid is needed, in my opinion. Laboring men want high wage's, and assert that they cannot live in California without To me it is perfectly plain that it is only those who are engaged in enterprises which retain large profits, who either will or can pay big wages; and yet the moment tiie projectors of such enterprises are believed to be getting rich, a cry of " grasping monopoly" is raised. " They must be crashed or the country is ruined." Workingmen of California, what benefit Lave you derived from a policy which forced a railroad company-^-one of the few, which have paid hlghl r wages for lab ir than we have any record of pverhaving been paid for the same kind oi work, on any such scale of magnitude, in any age of the world; tirst, to reduce the compensation of employes, and then to discharge from six to ten thousand to compete for tlie already too scant employment? It takes large sums ol money to carry on such enterprises, which can only be obtained by borrowing; and it makes a material difference whether bonds offered as security are worth seventy vents on ihe dollar or only thirty cents. Don't let an envious bar that somebody will accumulate more property than he' ought to own. blind you to your own interests. Suppose one man has acquired two hundred millions, if it consists in railroads:. thousand of individuals Lave been employed in their construction, and thousands are required to operate them ; and when he dies he cannot take them with him ; they still remain, to give employment totlr osandsmore; and whether the ownership or control ot such roads is vested in a thousand men, ten men, or one man, dues not trouble me; and whether it makes any material difference to the employes, 1 leave to the common sense of every interested Individual. To go back to the Chinese subject. That the Chinese have been vililied. misrepresented and mistreated by many, in a manner which should shame a people who call themselves civilized, are well known facts. That they have faults and vices:, and that some among them commit crimes the same as among otherpeople — is true. Their faults and vices should, in justice, be treated the same as such faults and vices in other.-; and their crimes should be (and I believe are i punished in the same manner as though committed by others. ISut when their faults and vices and crimes are alleged as sufficient reason for declaring the whole race a nuisance, it seems to me a horrible outrage ; and I wonder how anybody's ideas ot justice can have become '9o distorted. As individuals we all commit errors ; as communities in cities and townships we commit errors; as communities in counties we commit errors ; as communities in States we commit errors ; as one great national community we commit errors ; but if we respect the inalienable rights of all men and follow the golden rule, and try to live neighborly, in the ( sense as portrayed in the story of the good Samaritan, We shall survive all of our errors. Hut if we vie .late the rights of any. T>r countenance oppression of' the weak, from race antipathy or any other cause, we commit a crime against justice which will surely be followed by retribution. On of the Bovi'o-n t.i>. "No Physic, Sir, in Mine !" A gorxl story conies from a boy.-' boarding-acfaool in •Jeisey.'' The diet was nio- DOtoooos and coastiptting. and tlie learned l'rincipal decided to introduce sonic oldstyle physic in the apple-sauce and await the happy results. One bright lad, the WWTtart in Mfcool, discovered the Moct n;ine in his sauce, and pushing back his plate, >houted to the pedagogue, '• Nd phj-sic. sir, in mine. My dad told me to OH nuthin 1 but Dr. I'ierce's 'I'leasan; Pur^tive l'el'.ets,' and they are doing their duty like a tiiarni :' : They are anti-bilinuand purely vegetable. Fob Throat Diseases, Coughs. Colds, etc.. effectual relief is found in the use of " Brown's Bronchial Troches." Sold only in boxes. Price £5 cents. HYDRAULIC

Clipped from
  1. The Record-Union,
  2. 23 Jan 1886, Sat,
  3. Page 3

likelife Member Photo