Clipped From The Atlanta Constitution

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 - fficer in amatter in which the state is an...
fficer in amatter in which the state is an nterested" party if 3Ir. Hill will M this far. he will touch bed-rock and leave shor f tfiis fe for alts that be not deno iM.O16 etatejyill no this unfortunate controversy anything material or valuable. A Tent Case. William and Mary college of Virginia,1 was bttrn'&rdnnng the'war bythStederal army. Its rebuilding has long been urged on account of its distinguished alma mater which included Washington Jefferson Monroe Tyler besides Chief Justice Marshall. The college was the oldest but one in the country and the claim for reimbureementcame before congress in 1870 indorsed by scholarly and cultivated gentlemen in almost every northern state republicans as well as democrats. No war claim ever came up under more favorable circumstances. il had twice passed republican houses by large majorities but it was nevertheless slaughtered last week in the democratic louse by the decisive vote of 87 to 128. In vain did such republicans as Doctor Loring of Boston and Professor Monroe of Ohio urge its passage in. vain die Randolph Tucker show that by the law of nations educational institutes are free From destruction by 'armies all in vain was the eloquent apj eal of Mr. Goode For the bill was doomed from the outset It was used as a test case and its fate in dicates what is surely in store forall other war claims. They are to be remorseless slaughtered and that too by democrats. The democrats who voted against th Virginia bill were Messrs. Warner o Connecticut Ross Cutler and Harden bergh of New Jersey Patterson of Colorado Recllyof Pennsylvania Hamilton of Indiana Caldwell of Tenneese Jones of New Hampshire Springer Morrison Harrison Sparks Hartzell a Townsend of Illinois and McMahon Ohio. All the Georgia members who were present voted for the bill. The friends of the old college will doubtless try again in the forty-sixth congress but it is .more than probable that they will again fail and that no other war claim will become law. We have only to add that the mourners over this new depart ure do not predominate in this part of the country. John Sherman's Latest Trick. A more unscrupulous wretch than John Sherman does not live a fact which we have taken occasion to emphasize when ever the opportunity presented. We have already alluded to the plot by which he hoped to embarrass the Potter committee during their recent visit to New Orleans and we have endeavored to show with what serene confidence he leans upon the palpitating bosom of Mrs. Jenks frr support. He appears to have about him continually any number of stool- pigeons who are ready and anxious to perjure themselves at his bidding but apart from this he is one of the shiftiest and shrewdest of those who have plunged headforemost into the political wicked ness and knavery of our times. He caused decoy letters to be sent to the Potter comnihteefrom the west and then to crown his duplicity in this business ordered Mrs. .Jenks who is probably in his pay to drop forged letters in the streets of New Orleans and finally to deposit one in a carpet store. The scheme was blunderingly conceived and awkwardly carried out so that no one was deceived save Sherman and Agonies Jenks who doubtless believed that the committee would bite at the bait thrown to them. Foiled in this little game Sherman and his tools straightway addressed themselves to the work of deceit and perjury in another and entirely different direction. The trick was developed last Friday when sneaky John sent to the committee the affidavit of one St. Martin who was at of the Stenger subcommittee which was sent to New Orleans by the Potter committee last sum titer. In this affidavit a synopsis of which appeared in our telegrams last Sunday St. Martin said he was appointed through toe influence of E. S. Weber who also put him in communication with Gibson Maddux and Carter Mr. Tilden's "confidential agent St. Martin swears that these alleged "agents" took him in charge and informed him as to the nature of the work he would be called uponto perform. He was to discover pliant wit nesses and bring them to the aforesaid "agents who would then proceed to coach them as to the nature of the evi dence they were expected to give. St. Martin according to his affidavit carried out his part of the contract and-he furthermore affirms that he carried to Mr. Stenger from these "agents a list of questions to be asked. Sherman/a. tool then goes on to say that Weber was bribed by the "agents and that Weber tried to bribe him to testify that he had seen the Sherman letter- This affidavit it must be remembered was sent to the committee by John Slier- man and it bears his ear-marks in. bold relief. Beforehe is through with it the eminent political 'sneak will find it to be quite a thorn in his side. It will be es tablished beyond question that the affi davit was procured from St. Martin by corrupt and illegitimate means that he was bribed to make it by Morris Marks collector of internal revenue at New Orleans and that he was promised a place and position by the said Marks. Jake Cox of Ohio wanted the affidavit placed upon the record but the committee wisely determined to return it to Sherman with the information that they would be glad to have some words with St. Martin himself. The republican members of the committee declined to continued oppressions of the republican majority and looking' through a political glass darkly were'JriolenUj' opj u/ererx to belike tha hzensnj be a pgfitab sdjojjl fi all this is changed. We begSto perceive that the republicans builded better than tbejr knew we begin to realize rthe fact The editor of lUies JHeraUf undoubtedly catches a vague glimpse of what is coming and the vision slightly disturbs him. The reafity"vdald 14i9tnrr htm fifill rSore conld he be present at a Georgia election. .He would discover that the Colored dem ocrats ou out In their democ racy. He would -learn perhaps smt ia pang of regret that the negro demo crats are more enthusiastic and more persistent in their electioneering than the white democrats and that they get up earlier and stay at the polls later than any other class of our. fellow- citizens. In other words to utilize the philosophy of the Utica editor the school of citizenship has taught the colored man that his interests both material and 5 olitical are identical with the interests of the whites. He baa been taught in the school of citizenship that what benefits the whites benefits the blacks. He has learned that the policy which brings prosperity to one race brings it to the other. The Utica editor need have no fears about the color line nor need he vex his philosophical soul about the payment of poll-tax. Practically the color line does not exist in Georgia and by so much is the negro benefited. He is contented. He is not intimidated. He votes how he .pleases and for whom he pleases. If he can be "cajoled" into voting the democratic ticket well and good. No harm is done and his conscience is clearer. We assure the editor of the Herald that the Georgia negroes are comfortable as to their politics and their possessions. They are reasonably well off and many of them are dyed-in- the-wool democrats. 3IcLiK still continues to be one of the "special cases. A bill was personally reported in the senate the other day to pay him for supposed services as chief justice of New Mexico for the period lying between his appointment by Hayes and his rejection by the senate. Thus Mr. Marble's Pariah will probably in the end reap at least a little j pecuniary benefit for his action in conniving at the Florida frauds. THE hard-money men now claim that Sherman in resuming baa demonetized gold. John seems to be in a bad way all around. REV. DE LA MATTE should hurry up his cakes. His circuit is getting cold. The greenback party is melting with the ice and we shouldn't be surprised .if the rever- rend gentleman when he finally gets around is compelled to address his argu ments to a solid democracy. LOGAN is in trouble with his senatorial aspirations. If he gets left who will weep for Logan then THE Bainbridge Democrat predicts that there will be some big swindles developed in the wild lands business before the meeting of the legislature in July. Senator Russell is chairman and the Democrat says be i after the land-sharks with a sharp stick which has a large bug on the end of it IT is gratifying to know that the recent extraordinary cold weather in Florida did not materially damage the orange gloves. THE stalwarts are at their row's end with the negro unless they can hatch out an other freedmen's bureau with a full supply of rations and a new set of carpet with a new set of lies. STILLSOX HrTCHrss of the Washington lost prefers to get up Saturday night champagne soirees to getting out almanacs. WE are glad to learn that all the members of the Hayes family even down to the ami able Rogers who it will be remembered once slid unceremoniously down the bannis ter stair wear home-made woolen socks. This is true and healthful economy. WE have forgotten whether it was Sheri dan that killed Schurz or Schurz that killed Sherid-n. MR. BLAND says resumption may possibly last six months. Does Mr. Bland mean it will last six months in New York 1 That is the only place where there is any practical attempt at resumption and even there they complain that resumption is only the demonetization .of gold. I KSTE AD of trolloping around wi th Ulysses of Ulster Noy s ought to be here to face Judge Cocks. of Florida. The Potter com mittee are in session and everything is ripe. IT is a surprisi ng thing that Grant's friends have never claimed that he is a native Irish man. Freedman's bank begun In knavery and ended in knavery. Even the receivers turned out to be thieves but they stole in accordance with law and were protected by the courts. THE democracy of Decatur county appears to have gone under at the recent county election. The independents and republi cans carried the day. WE still insist that John Cockerill of the Baltimore Gazette. be sprit to Rprlin We would not only finish the life of Goethe in paragraphs but lie would finish several kegs of beer. THE Hon. G. Wash. Childs A. M. de. serves.so well of his own country that we cannot afford to allow him to go off on a spree to Germany. IF Thurman nominated for governor by the democrats of Ohio the republicans pro pose to put" Sneak Sherman on the track. This is natural Only a political corrnp- tionist can consolidate the republican be la h ts had our as a 2 is to c > i I l I I I L L t arnatterIn whichthe staleisan so m If 'othisfar wllIt6nchbed-roclra d s tr cliorfthis e wi1,1 ye pedoor1 t )11 as nt deno4ce5 g b at tejlfl not fro a -U t ofVinia It T c i c it house 87to appeal in-for all remorselesaiy the of Redly of IndianaCaldwell and of live-a Pottercomniiiteefrorn lifferentelireetion. tenger mnhittee upon to evj- with-it es- ox oUticalglaesdarkly ee intothe tu wecouwt made o bthe th4fhzeisWotd ve tot e pefltabt4scJol fjthe ier But ilth1 egiipe ive buildedbetter- th theac on.the negro use-v conierrea an meats- manie politicaiboon upon use solid sotith he hie Heraidhndpubtedly ng andthe reafitw nM dinlihtinedll i r ataGeorgin thatthe eoloreddem- th irdembc- -l5fllh3j5S pith a Lhatthey editorthe hastaught political paymeutOfpoll-taL nd i andfor lyingbetween S troublewith forLoganthen -it I I I I r r I r iNSTEADOf with Noyas I isa surpriaingthirtg Grant'friendi Tue knaver r I I adwere r I count r i Gee the- paragraphs--but severs 1 de servemso i i a Ia b r put wu retu of ¬ ¬ , - ¬ , , ; . , " , . . - , ) | , \ _ ' . . . , , ' & ; ' . , , , , , . , ¬ , . . ! ; . , , , ] . 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 14 Jan 1879, Tue,
  3. Page 2

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