Clipped From The Atlanta Constitution

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 - it of a Tb uue.ot iQjDay Negro-Suffrage and...
it of a Tb uue.ot iQjDay Negro-Suffrage and Negro Office Holding HfaQi yrc -THare Peace Tn rapvement noir o-n fooj lo.theIonse of Ee prwea'tKtlyea to expel cert tlq m m- hers on account' of color originated 'with dldaW for the United. States' Senate' the present Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia During the Gubernatorial canvass In the month of March last. Chief Justice Brown proclaimed the opinion In a speech which be delivered at Marietta. that' the. new Constitution conferred suffrage but not the right to bold office on the colored . man- This announcement surprised no one. There were quite a number of Beconstrnctlonists or "Conservative Republicans of that day who held aim lar opinions and who for that reason re fused to vote for a man for Governor who had fxpressed a desire to see negroes elect ed to the Legislature Here then was the beginning of the split In the 'Republican party or rather this was the point where those who accept ed "reconstruction" as a means to an end and pierelr as a choice of evils parted company with thatpaity which was and is nnderatoodto be the advocate of "political equality regardless of color. One regarded suffrage as a political Privilege only to be extended to the negro or not as the people themselves might elect. The other held suffrage to be an Inalienable Bight Inherent to every free member of society regardless of color or previous condition and which might not be denied limited or taken away without violating those principles of free government which underlie our political fabric. Hence one so supported the policy of Congress in forcing negro suffrage upon the State as a necessity the other through choice. One accepted it In the spirit of compromise very much as the man who banded the robber his purse rather than lose both life and purse whilst the other eagerly embraced an opportunity thus offered to Incorporate in our State Constitution principles to which they hat long been wedded or to which they had become zealous converts. If It should be asked why ex-Governor Brown supported Bullock's nomination let it be remembered that lie is a politician that It was Bullock's friends in the Legislature who worked so zealously for Brown's election to the U. 8. Senate and when defeated In this scheme. It was Bullock ho displaced Judge Warner in order to put GOT. Brown in his place anl that It was Bullock' friends In the Senate who rati fied this nomination Let it al o be borne in mind that Brown as United States Sen ator would have been in a position to re deem himself with his old Democratic friends by working for the repeal of alt test oaths and gradually ascending the scale until be could have reached his old position In that party when he first be came known to the people 01 Georgia Negro suffrage in Georgia is now an ac complished fact just as It was in Tennes- 66 some thirty-eight years ago but the eligibility of negroes to office is now as it was then denied by the very men who advocated negro suffrage. John Bell elected to Congress from his district in Tennessee by negro votes was perfectly consistent In denying those colored voters the right to hold office because he believed suffrage to be a political privilege merely and not an Inalienable right as did Benjamin Lu 11- day and Wm. Lloyd Garrison. The whole question of negro eligibility to office hinges upon the single proposition as to whether suffrage la a privilege or right. In the former case under the present Constitution and Laws of Georgia a negro Is clearly ineligible to civil office. In the latter he became a voter jvrt ditto the moment he be came a free man and'the restoration of this inalienable right long denied him made him per consequence eligible to office. This is the -higher law" theory In its practical application and is understood to be the principles of the Radical party. If it is not then v\ e should like to be enlightened as to the doctrines of that party touching the question of "political equality. Assuming therefore that the Radicals are sincere In their dogma that "all men regardless of race of color are created free and equal that they are' endowed alike by the Creator with "certain Inalienable rights whereof Suffrage is one and that "governments among men derive their power from the consent of the majority of the governed then they must to be consistent with themselves admit that a negro may be elected and qualified to any civil office from that of coroner to Presi dent of the United States and that to de ny him the exercise of the functions of such office would be revolution. On the other hand the modern Democrats or Conservatives believe with the old Federalists that all men are naturally tin-equal that 'order Is Heaven's first law that some are and must be greater than the rest that gotenment implies obedience that consequently suffrage Is a political privilege vonchedsafe to to those who.enjoy U by that power In a State competent to grant It that It like any other franchise may be recalled when experience baa demonstrated the Incapacity of the recipient to exercise without abusing it just as it wa recalled In Tennessee more than a quarter of a century ago and that any resistance to such a withdrawal of suffrage is revolution. Here then we have the real issue before the American people. It ii fairly made up. The lines are minutely drawn. Hen of all former political opinions are bury leg minor dlfferenci-s and taking position upon one side or the other. no middle ground. TL 4tfeftf"tSar 'ad unmUtakable Wedecislon is not far off. It wlllb nft letus hope peaceable at fflMog Presidential election. 'jilt Ken It 1 a sad waste of time for a Legis Raters to be-babbling over the question whichbas been engrossing attention dui- lag the past week. If they cannot proceed In harmony to the discharge of those du ties legitimately' before them let them ad- Joura aatn the decision is bad at 'the ballot fand when once had let 'men .of all parties abide It peaceably. to to Is 'to I I b .1 kt .uT1ri' h UtU 1 ,1 T. of IY-Neg6- e ldlUf iTh. liloqf t Vo.uei otRpf- 'Qp crhlq' cm b oD aunt' Clor. rglnat.lwitb G0cBr1tDSCfl tl' d oBbe UDlt 8t' Sate pt ClefJasUceotte S preme Cour Gera t. D ii Gubratorial eT&1n te mCt 1arlt Cle JnUe Brwl prlmtd the'oplnloD up wich' I deUfe aLYa.rIt t L. iei CittiUOD' Clte ng noCte rgt. ofu 0m .m Tla anlo'uDement 'n on ea br Renstctonist "nsenaU VI Rpbicn" t&t he1lslml- laroplnIns cwb ta n fu t or ovrr 1 9pr dei t s nt ioeielect e .to I ne Iplt 'Republcn pary rtber pint tboe accpt recn.tcton' end erlr&acbolce oUs pre cpy wu.nd I det b t id1' te "poltcal eualty. rgarle r are i r .apolt Pchiege t extende neg a po themsevemljbt belleufrge t Inalenable Rh. ever te regale of coor conditon ml bt b lmie tkn wlbout TlolatlnJ tbos ciple fr grrnmet underle ou Cne ppore polcy O.nJr sulge Stt neeslT acpt i Iplrt compromi a tle wh hande rbbr pure Rber tan los Je purs oter embrced thulofe t Incorport Stte Cn. Ituton t wb.lctey h bn wede bome zloU onvrta. I i uke e.Governor Brow I ppr Bulok's nominaton. i nmembr Iapolticial I Bulok's frend I. I.- worke eecton Snat fet thlucheme i Bulock who dllpla orer GT. hi an 1 Bulock' riend te Snate rt- fe nominaton I Lt I b brne Unite Stalts .8n- bn oalton re d hl- 1 old Demortt or te rtpa al tt se unt rache pollton parl fr t t cme pple Ger lal NeJ sufrsg Gerjla ac- cmplihe factjust a wa I sme tblry-eljht elJblty orne s ofce denie nry ad-I vOtd negr sufmge. Dl Conge fom hi dltrct Teur.eae vot prfetly cnsistent thos clore righ ofce bus bleve sufrale b poltlc Inalenable right Lou- dr Garison. queston ne elgibity fc' propition whetberanfe right te orer ce prnt stitton Lws Gergia I derl ineljtlble fc lattr. becme Tot dici. moment b. r and' the restoraton thi "Inaienable right" hIm me'hm consquence elgible ofc Thi it prctca applc.ton st b prIncples Iadlcal prr. I we Ie t b enlghtene doctrine pary que ton "plltlcai euity. Almlng therefore Ricls a Iincre dogma "l mel rgl creat eual a 'eneowed aUk Creatr -crain InalIe- rIJlbt" Sufrg tha "goverment delTe pwer m.jorly oc govrne" b conll nt tbemfele amlt tat Deg b det qualle omce fm corner dentofhe Unite Stt hi ecrls fQnctoni ofce rvolution. Ontbe otbe te moen Dmorata Cn- lnaUTes blleTe Feerist mel a .ry "rder Bevn' At &i ad gter rt gmmmlmple obe n that coni quentr al pltcl prTne Touchesfe t thO who. enjoy pwer St comptent.to gnl I It francbls red experienchu stt te Inpaiy t uerl wItot abllng It-just I rle Tennemore t qtarr .cntr a ld tha any.rla n withdrawa sufg reTolu ne w rlse'btore. Alerc PPle I I aid' mae up lne ar mInuty rawn. rorer pll\lcal opinin. a bl mnor diferenc. tkln PllOD npn one 'ler Is midle gund urtbl l 1 fa oJ 1 b. 11 hp ig PrentW deUon,1 I k uadwut tme or .gs. n b-biDg tequetlon wb b b un lDX atnton dl I te p wek the cnot Pr I hD1 th dig .o tho let1brore them a- jn 1t te dlal baerat "t'b It c n h lt Jm1' r f 6 lr OL wzWWG. t.o.r w pv U I d i j t- Pofooiiit1tuuI.t JJ Tb.ssuoot thaJM- sh Io i'IL1seaco no qnfo ntbe lou cerstq inm nsoco iint orlginatedwith enne &at&SeuateL. ChlefJusttce JuitlceBrowa aupeeebwbichbedeflvered thatthi.'ne'C rngeut noithe theooloed4man an oneTberowere I- intwbo ba4fxpressed uegroeselect ecc pt. ass meansto polttl ai whichthey Ilt Lea de- thieseheme ed also re- fact-just Ten nes- cesoznetb1rty-eigbt ornegroes boldomee d Id ofrace ar whereofSuffrage rota dentofthe de- iuff sge s. InTenneueeinore ago-and thatanyreststance llerethen wehave I Ihere izeal1j jImidtitW rind unin1atkab1edecIsl n Itw-.jU g TIlI Len engro bgthaweek. 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 01 Sep 1868, Tue,
  3. Page 2

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