Butthole Surfers circa 1996

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Butthole Surfers circa 1996 - Surfers riding an ebbing shock wave By Andy...
Surfers riding an ebbing shock wave By Andy Smith Knight-Ridder Knight-Ridder Knight-Ridder Newspapers Outrage is just business as usual for the Butthole Surfers. It's an attitude that extends right to their name. Whether it's the movies of genital surgery they've screened during concerts, or the genre-bending genre-bending genre-bending sonic weirdness, or the lyrics to ditties such as "The Shah Sleeps In Lee Harvey's Harvey's Grave" and "Bar-B-Que "Bar-B-Que "Bar-B-Que "Bar-B-Que "Bar-B-Que Pope," the Surfers have never been your normal band, even by the very loose standards of alternative alternative rock. Recently the Surfers created created a stir by supposedly insulting insulting an audience in Corpus Christi, Texas, that had been throwing objects on stage. "There are few experiences in life that leave one feeling as sullied as a spin through the grooves of a Butthole Surfers record," reports The Trouser Press Record Guide. So it's odd to find them with a radio single off their current "Electriclarryland" album, a song called "Pepper." Over a hip-hop hip-hop hip-hop beat, head Surfer Gibby Haynes delivers a half-spoken half-spoken half-spoken litany of fatal events ("They were all in love with dying . . .") that recalls punk poet Jim Carroll's Carroll's "People Who Died." Then the song goes into a chorus that is actually very pretty. So has the mainstream finally finally caught up to the Butthole Surfers? Or have the Butthole Surfers caught up to mainstream? mainstream? "I guess it was a very well-timed well-timed well-timed release," said a rather distracted Haynes. "We were always always a half-cycle half-cycle half-cycle behind, or maybe we were a half-cycle half-cycle half-cycle ahead. Now the cycle has tightened, tightened, and for a little while we're right on top of it." The rest of the album includes includes the slamming punk of "Birds and LA," the odd "Jingle of A Dog's Collar," the pretty, countryish "TV Star," and the Music electronic blips and buzzes of "My Brother's Wife," a tale of forbidden lust foryou-know-who. foryou-know-who. foryou-know-who. foryou-know-who. foryou-know-who. "Let's Talk About Cars" consists entirely ofa conversation conversation in French. This, by the way, is considered considered one of the band's most accessible accessible records. The original title of the album album was to be "Oklahoma!" but the Surfers changed the title to avoid legal problems with Rogers Rogers & Hammerstein, who wrote the Broadway show, and Capitol Records, the label for the Broadway soundtrack album. As it happens, Capitol is also the Surfers' record label. The Texas band was founded founded in 1981 by Haynes and guitarist guitarist Paul Leary. Haynes, believe believe it or not, was an accounting student at the time. In the pre-Nirvana pre-Nirvana pre-Nirvana era, before bands like the Surfers could count on major label support, they toured endlessly, releasing albums on tiny independent labels labels and building a devoted, if warped, following. Haynes said that once the Butthole Surfers started, there was no turning back. "Maybe the very first song we ever did, 1 thought maybe we were going too far. I can't remember remember what it was . . . but I remember remember thinking 'We've done it now.' After that, there was no turning back." By the '90s, though, they had signed with Capitol, played Lol-lapalooza, Lol-lapalooza, Lol-lapalooza, and were considered pioneers of alternative rock. "Well, a lot of bands say we have influenced them, but I think it's in terms of the spirit, not the sound," Haynes said. "Very few bands would ever try to sound like us." By now, all three of the main Surfers Leary, Haynes and drummer King Coffey have their own projects. Leary is a record producer f,,r ill SkJLL i jlJLLjl King Coffey, left, Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary, right, comprise the often often irreverent rock band Butthole Surfers. who has worked with hot acts like the Toadies and the Meat Puppets. Coffey has his own band, Drain, and runs a hip record record label, Trance Syndicate. And Haynes plays with Johnny Depp in a band called P and has worked as a disc jockey for an Austin radio station, where his outrageous musical tastes and blunt remarks (he called the station's playlist "puke chunks" on the air) made a powerful impression. But m an era when Perry Farrell titled an album "Noth ing's Shocking," can the Butthole Butthole Surfers keep on surpising, if not actually shocking, a jaded public? There was a lengthy pause at the other end of the phone. "Doing original music is surprising surprising enough for most people," people," Haynes said. "The whole idea of (rock) shows is to be something of mystery flashing flashing lights, darkness, loud noise, you're not really supposed to know what's going on . . . it's an amazing thing to me, that we pull off shows at all."

Clipped from The San Bernardino County Sun10 Aug 1996, SatPage 32

The San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, California)10 Aug 1996, SatPage 32
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  • Butthole Surfers circa 1996

    smithern – 18 Oct 2017

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