Clipped From The Los Angeles Times

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 - HPPIW IN HURON, crews of 20 have been replaced...
HPPIW IN HURON, crews of 20 have been replaced by only a few f ieldworkers as farmers struggle to sustain their harvests. Many residents are moving to places where California's drought has had less of an impact. COLUMN ONE Dreams die in drought For the farmworking communities of the San Joaquin Valley, a third year of little rain puts their livelihoods in jeopardy By Diana Marcum, reporting from huron, calif. The two fieldworkers scraped hoes over weeds that weren't there. "Let us pretend we see many weeds," Francisco Galvez told his friend Rafael. That way, maybe they'd get a full week's work. They always tried to get jobs together. Rafael, the older man, had a truck. Galvez spoke English. And they liked each other's jokes. But this was the first time in a month, together or alone, that they'd found work. They were two men in a field where there should have been two crews of 20. A farmer had gambled on planting drought-resistant garbanzo beans where there was no longer enough water for tomatoes or onions. Judging by the garbanzo plants' blond edges, it was a losing bet. Galvez, 35, said his dream is to work every day until he is too bent and worn, then live a little longer and play with his grandchildren. He wants to buy his children shoes when they See Drought, A8 Photographs by MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ Los Angeles Times FRANCISCO GALVEZ, 35, sits on the floor of his modest home as a Mormon missionary speaks with his family. In Huron, religion has sprouted where crops have not.

Clipped from
  1. The Los Angeles Times,
  2. 30 May 2014, Fri,
  3. Main Edition,
  4. Page 1

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