Henri Michel brother of Georges Michel English Channel Swimer

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Henri Michel brother of Georges Michel English Channel Swimer - No Swimmer Chilly Water Too Much For 1 99 en...
No Swimmer Chilly Water Too Much For 1 99 en Entrants Michel, French Baker, Does Greatest Distance Taken From Water Last l UKE SHORE. Toronto, Sept. 6 IT I Lake Ontario was victor II I In Wednesday' third Wrig- Wrig- - ley marathon swim. Its chilly waters saw the defeat of some of the world's most famous swimmers, and none of the 100 starters had sufficient stamina to finish the 15-miles' 15-miles' 15-miles' struggle. Georges Michel, French conqueror of the English Channel, who last yrar finished second in the 21-mile 21-mile 21-mile marathon, was taken from the water at 1U.12 p.m., alter completing 12'-i 12'-i 12'-i miles of the course in 11 hours 12 minutes. He had been the sole survivor survivor since 6.42 p.m., when Errmt Vierkoettcr, of Germany, the 1927 champion, and Louis I. Mathias. of Long Island, IN.i., nad iauen victims to the cold. In view of the fact that no swimmer swimmer finished the course, distribution of the prize money, which totals $35,000, lies at the discretion of the directors of the swim, and at a late hour last night no decision had been leached as to what proportion of the award would go' to the French baker, who swam farther and endured endured the elements longer than any other entrant. El wood Hughes, director of sports of the Canadiun National exhibition, under whose auspices the swim was held, would not speculate on the probable disposition of the money. It Is probable the matter will not bo finally settled until today. "I swam farther than Vierkoetter," said Michel, with a. gesture of satisfaction, satisfaction, as he was tak-en tak-en tak-en from the water. He had swum a quarter of a mile further than the German, who swum 12 miles. Trailing Vierkoetter Vierkoetter by two miles when the German German collapsed, Michel plodded along for 3' hours In a pall of darkness that was pierced only by the tiny lights of the score of accompanying boats and the occasional sweep of searchlights played on the course ion the exhibition grounds. Although the lights of the trailing boHts behind the swimmer were the only objects on which they could rivet their gaze, thousands of spectators, spectators, some of whom had been standing along the lake tront all day, kept up their shouts of encouragement encouragement for the lone survivor, and heard the announcement of his retirement retirement through the medium of the radio loud speakers. Considering the ordeal he had been through, Michel was in fairly good condition when he arrived In the lifesaving launch at the National Yacht club, the swim hospital. He was bundled Into bed. given a stimulant, stimulant, and hot water bottles were applied applied to his body, while several attendants attendants maHsaged him. Dr. M. M. Crawford, who attended him, stated that his condition was good, everything considered, and that he would be himself In a few hours. According to Henri Michel, his brother and manager, the Parisian baker did not want to leave the water, and only did so after repeated repeated urging on tno part of his attendants. attendants. "He is my brother, and I did not want to see him suffer," Henri Michel said. Georges repeatedly stated that he wished to complete the course, but his brother thought it best to give up when he had exceeded the distance distance Vierkoetter had covered. Observers at the spot where Michel left the water stated that the Frenchman was very badly paralyzed paralyzed and could not possibly have gone on. The race became a one-man one-man one-man endurance endurance test shortly after 6.30 p.m., when Ernst Vierkoetter, of Ger many, another English Channel conqueror, conqueror, who won last year's 21-mile 21-mile 21-mile struggle, was compelled to give up when he was about two miles, or neatly a lap in front of Michel. Virtual paralysis seized Vierkoetter almost without warning, as It did Norman Ross, of Chicago, and George Young, of Toronto, who held the lead during the early stages of the race. I Record Set for ! Low Number of Putts on Round x b Music in ' ''vs t The World wSns -Sinking -Sinking a ' )n- )n- LOfifi Pitt.' By AL DEMAREE (Former Pitcher New York Giants) Jut what U the world's record for the fewest number of putts made In playing la holes of golf ? Charley Wlndle, of the Park Ridge, 111., Country club claims he made a world's record recently when he went around his course and used only 23 putts In 18 holes, using only one putt each on the first ten holes To Bettle this controversy I am ap pealing to the golfers of the U.S. and Canada. If any golfer has ever played 18 holes, using only 23 or less putts for the round, will tell me how, when and where he did it, I will be glad to give him the publicity nis lent demands. Speaking of putts, Al Espinona told me recently of the greatest exhibition exhibition of putting he ever saw. "I was plaving a voting fellow bv the name of Dcrr," said Al, "and I played golf that would have won for me nine times out of- of- ten, hut here is what Derr did with his magic putter: Morning round: Third hole, went around a stymie with a 25-foot 25-foot 25-foot putt and won the hole; seventh, sank a 30-foot 30-foot 30-foot putt for a par five to halve tne noie; eigntn, went around a stymie on a sloping green with a 15-foot 15-foot 15-foot putt to halve; tenth, dropped a zu-rooier zu-rooier zu-rooier lor a Dlrdle three to win: 16th, ran down another 20-footer 20-footer 20-footer to halve after chipping short; 18th, holed out a SCVfoot putt to halve, alter missing his second. Afternoon round: Third hole, ran down a 15-footer 15-footer 15-footer on a slooinz Ereen for a half; 13th, with my ball on the green of a 203-yard 203-yard 203-yard hole for a sure tnree, sank a 45-foot 45-foot 45-foot putt over an undulating green for a birdie two to win; 17th, dropped a 25-footer 25-footer 25-footer for a oiroie tnree to win the hole and match. It got so I turned my back on him again and again just to hear the old cup ring. I couldn't bear to watch the putts dropping in rrnm every corner or tne green (Copyright, 1928) YESTERDAYS NATIONAL LEAGUE iKIisl game) moiwiyn iraurmono 2 13 s o'"inn ;i?i?oionxj 9 13 I rok. Enriwrdi nd Krbsrry, Brandt and Taylor. ISscnnd game)

Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune06 Sep 1928, ThuPage 17

The Winnipeg Tribune (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada)06 Sep 1928, ThuPage 17
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  • Henri Michel brother of Georges Michel English Channel Swimer

    chris72796 – 11 Sep 2013

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