Clipped From The Express

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 - Shore Lines By Joseph Cox Claussville, without...
Shore Lines By Joseph Cox Claussville, without the Santa, is in Lehigh County, County, not too far from Friedens, a name that suggests peace on earth. A tale of the interurban trolleys comes fom the latter town. We have been on the track of these for some time, since reading of the attempts to start a line between Jersey Shore and Lock Haven. "When the trolley was still operating through the village, a local spinster, Miss Kitty M., decided she wanted to visit a relative living in the city." The city must have been Allentown, in the Morning Morning Call of which the story was found. ft ft ft • "She was not used to traveling very much by trolley. Arrangements were made with the relatives to meet Kitty when she arrived' in the city. All this worked out very nicely. "After three days in the city she wanted to return home. Her relatives took her to the trolley stop and instructed her to tell the conductor when and where she wanted to get off. This confused her somewhat and when she got on the trolley she at once told the conductor that he was to let her off where she had got on three days before. £ ' & & "This was a big problem for the conductor, for he had not been on duty that day. However, it was solved by Kitty herself. She recognized the village church and schoolhouse when they arrived in the village and called out to the conductor: " 'Do will ich runner.' (Here I want to get off). "In her talks with her neighbors she was now an experienced traveler." Preston A. Barba carried the story in his colmun in the Morning Call "devoted to the literature, lore and history of the Pennsylvania Germans," with this note: ft ft ft Some time ago we acquainted our readers with Osville C. Peter, eccentric story-teller in the little vilage of Friendens, but known far and wide as Flig- gel Peder (Winged Peter) some of whose stories .and anecdotes were gathered in and published in book form by Walter T. Handwerk, of Slatington R.D. 1. The following following anecdotes appear here by courtesy of Mr. Handwerk and are not included in the bound volume." ft ft & We owe many of our Christmas customs to the Pennsylvania Dutch, as Stevenson Whitcomb reminds us. He says that the Scotch-Irish settlers did not observe Christmas to any extent, and many of the New England English who settled in the Wyoming Valley did not, at first, observe Christmas, New Year or Easter, since these were fetedays of the ecclesiastical ecclesiastical organization that had persecuted them in England. ft ft if Another tale in Pennsyivaanisch Deitsch Eck, as the column is called, has to do with a present which may or may not have been given at Christmas. "In the days when the Fliggel Peder went to school, it was still the ruling that the parents ted to buy the necessary books and slate and slate pencil. "One such school was attended by two boys from the same family who were close enough in age to be in the same class. One of the textbooks used in the school was a catechism, and as usual in a Pennsylvania German German community, the catechism was in German. ft ft ft "The parents being of the thrifty Pennsylvania German type, decided they could save money by buying buying only one copy of the needed book, from which they could both study. "This arrangement worked nicely for some weeks, but the teacher began to notice that something was wrong. He noticed that the neck of one of the boys was leaning toward the right shoulder, and that of the other boy toward the left shoulder. ft ft ft "He did not wish to see them go through life with crippled necks for such a reason. One day he told the boys that he had an old, used catechism at home which he would give to them. He was certain that both boys would be benefitted. This German gift book solved the problem and both boys grew up to be straight, upright men." ft ft ft When the weather is calm and tranquil during the fortnight before Christmas, as it has been so far. these days are known as Halcyon Days.

Clipped from The Express21 Dec 1967, ThuPage 6

The Express (Lock Haven, Pennsylvania)21 Dec 1967, ThuPage 6
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