Rene Seligman father Albert Seligman

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Rene Seligman father Albert Seligman - The impressionable voiced debutante may no...
The impressionable voiced debutante may no longer throw herself with great ecstasy into the arms of dress- suited "toughs. IC.ll society along the Atlantic seaboard has at V la t awakened to the J great danger that beset Us youngest and fairest members and has'purged itself of Its "dancing men. For the last four jears socteo lu relied for a large part of Its entertainment upon the hireling dancers who without recommendation as to character except la a few of the more famous professionals have come and gone in exclusive homes without supervision or restraint. The bored matrons and blase grand dames welcomed the advent of these un conventional characters for the presence of an ex-gunman or a tenderloin dandy as a dancing instructor lent excitement to the lesson. To float about the room in the arms of these "toughs who were clad for the occasion in evening clothes added much spice to the dance. That many of these entertainers were degenerates poisonous products of the underworld did not matter they could dance and they fawned upon their employers cleverly. Many of the men of high society too hurrahed the coming of the women dancing instructors for the great majority of these slim sinuous girls were Informal of speech and action and under their simulation of -society talk there ran the manners of the dent But no especial harm came from this craze of society so long as the older husbands and-matrons were amused. However when the system of hiring squads of these soft-footed hard-mouthed tight-lipped characters for balls and dinner dances became general the great danger arose. The Impressionable sn voiced" debutantes aped their aunts and older sisters la welcoming the new partners but they threw themselves v ith greater ecstasy Into the arms of the dress-suited "toughs. They thought it the thing to do They had heard and read much of the ild ways of tender- Ipia men bow fascinating th y arc how they shot to kill how they carried on long feuds and how they managed their women In the manner of Parisian apaches. To dance with them In million-dollar parlors was a. great adventure. None of the sordidness the sickening aspects of vice were attached to these easy- tongued Beau Brummells of the Bowery when they appeared to show society women the latest "hugs" and "shakes" lnthe an art. They were clever lml the "society manners. Notice Effect Upon the Debutantes. This began to hate too touch influence on the debutantes the matrons .thought Several unfortunate Incidents occurred which proved this suspicion. The younger set of society members began to show the effects of the debauch not so much In any actual loosening of morals as in the development of "tough" manners and undrcum- spent language. Some of the "bud fell in love with dancing men and tad to be lee- tured severely ren taken away from New York before the spell was off them. Society set up a wild Barry when Eugenia Kelly a wealthy girl. eloped professional dancer. Al Davis marrying him. Society polled itself together face to The Apache dance which taken -with out expurgation from the vicious un derworld of Paris 'was often borrowed when the sensational dance craze ruled society. face with a real danger. It must see Its debutantes coarsened or see its entertain ers depart. It most glee up its only sweet naive possession or surrender Its thrill So during the season lost closed it "fired the dancing men and. accomplishing a complete metamorphosis ot Its tastes,1 a complete revolution of its attitude toward amusement set about developing its own entertainment. Man Vith ideas Explains Change. Much of society's success has been due to the genius of John Murray Anderson a past master in the art of pageantry whom smart society now seeks out for inspiration. He does not attempt to amuse them. Rarely does he provide professional entertainers. He simply furnishes a new idea sometimes only a suggestion and then those of the sm rt set who have found that they possess sneetjpices skilled hands and fcuppte-ftmbird rtne rest. "What has caused this new order of things I do not know exactly says Murray Anderson "unless it is that society is suffering from a revulsion of feeling brought about by the past four j ears' orgy of decadent dancing. Society literally has been drunk with the dance'and until satiated permitted things in the name of terpsichore that in the words of an old song 'never were seen or heard in the Bowery. -I take It then that the passing of a certain type of professional danctn man. the n ell named tango lounge lizard is a pretty good Indication that society is now trying to purge its soul a well as Its salons. Another sign that society has come to Its senses and has in a. manner of cpeakhig. "hit the sawdust trail" is the crate for crudity. At the height of the dancing fad the J Hired Dancing Men and .Women From the Underworld "All Right for Mother and Father BUT WHEN THEIR LITTLE GIRL BEGINS to APE the "LOUNGE LIZARD" Language and Manners the 400" OUST Their Naughty J ENTERTAINERS and Are Amusing Themselves/ I When the 400" Entertain Today ERE are tome of Pie tMngt the 4 T \ave done tfnce they "fired hired entertainers" and found themtelvet AT a "strike bail" given by Mrs. Albert J. Selitfman the tfu t turn waiter and musician AT a big hospital benefit Mr Adrian Hoffman Joline make muflia rare instruments ire Her collection. AT a society play Mr Harry Payne Whitney designs th scenery AND at all the big affairs this year the 400" discover their own young people can sing and dance with more grace and skill than do the professionals. 5v wV v sN Vi vvvt vv' W A v .v V Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney whose designing of scenery for a play for society folk is typical of the great revelation in the amusement schemes of the social world. Photo by C/ndencood d Underwood. limit of luxury .was reached In the elaborate costumed balls and exotic ballets put on in most pretentious fashion in the homes of the wealthy. One of the most noteworthy of these affairs was Louis Co Tiffany's Arabian Nights balL 'After it came the swift decline until today the Un& key note of culture Is crudity Strike Ball Unique and Successful. It Is the present craze for crudity that was responsible for one of the most unusual affairs of the Winter in New York City. This was the strike ball given by Mrs. Albert 1. Sellgman la honor of her de- Mrs. Eugenia Kelly Davis who when a debutante became enamored of the cabaret life of New York and thus awakened society to the perilous environment of Uajroung girls. Photo by Uniertcaod 4 Undencood. butante daughter. Miss Rene Seligman herself an amateur dancer of remarkable ability. This unique ball was given in a- rather famous bo hernia a restaurant were a sawdust-strewn floor bare deal tables and a raftered ceiling gave the proper atmos phere of crudity. The invitations were garbed in the form of Black Hand threats. The night of the ball the guests arrived clad In costumes that represented factory workers railroad employes street car con ductors mechanics and other industrial workers who have persistently gone on strike in this country. The restaurtot wu arranged with a ir\Y cost Miss Natalie Johnson a prominent NewNYork -society girl as a Dutch soldier in the monster costume ball for charity at 'Palm I Beach where the debutantes andjnatrons of the 4W pSaBnetl and executed their own entertainment scorning all professional aid and rigidly excluding all "dancing men. Phoio by r/ndencootf 6 fake wall Inside the ballroom with wits- down Inserted and at a signal from the strike leader a well-known Fifth avenue clubman bricks soft Imitations to be sure were burled through the windows'tne guests were scattered and riot and confu Mon reigned. As the supper was about to .be/served the waiters went on a strike. A fake com mittee waited on the hostess and demanded a GO per cent increase In their pay. Of -course she refused to pay It even la stage money and so"the guests uteri compelled to don aprons and serve themselves The disgruntled waiters then started a riot and it was necessary to send In a call for twelre imitations of 'twelve of New York's finest policemen who found It a hard task to restore order. After this there was dancing on a floor littered with broken bricks and bits of glass. Then the musicians also went on strike. Volunteer musicians from among the guests took tuel places and the danc log proceeded until the wee hours of the morning when the amateur orchestra also struck. Still another distinctive affair and one that gave society a chance to show the staff It is made of was the bazaar .and pageant given for the beneflv of t Marks Hospital Although one of the most ultra .affairs of the season members of the smart et. young and old were called upon to display their Tailed talents In direct competition with c professional entertainers. Prove 4@A" Can Equal Professionals. v That the occasion was one of. th amart .smartest Is rincS bf'th name of IOBM of th gu ts and patrootaKC wko coached and applauded the efforts of the amateurs. Among the sodetr leaders personally par ticipating In the pageant were Mrs Vincent Astor Mrs. Anthony J. Drexel Jr. Mrs. Irttag Brokiw Mrs. William K. Vanderhilt bird S. Game 11" Mrs. Charles" L. Tiffany and a host of others whose names stand for social distinction. Members of the -Junior/ "League danced ta the various period plays of the pageant Mrs. Adrian Hoffman Joline a digalfl most ronserratlTe fist ancient musical Instrument from her rare collection a collection considered to be one of the finest in the world- and when no one else professional or. amateur was found who could play them she enthusiastically gave a series of per formances herself that werq the. hit of the pageant and caused something of a furor la muslcardrcles. This pageant If It did nothing _ proved to those concerned that the young woman who has Just been Introduced Into the world of social Uf U qulta'as able to dance act and get her stuff over .the footlights In the stage saying the moat TersatUe.Broadway faiorlte. "In fact bet ter says Murray Anderton who again furnished th inspiration Tor society girls are bora with the poise grace and dl atty so essential In perfect dancing whll professionala mast acquire these attributes. But the dance is cot the only one of th 'arts that has brought oat soderj's talents from under the bushel basket. Mr Fraak Carpenter showed brofesd ials a this or two by her success la handttsff'aUttht decorating for the huge Ten Allies sag that was \glTea in Usdisoa Syait Oat d a last fall 'i T' .A T 1 'Or T 'm. 'I" T" TI.O. T V4. 'R "m. .I T..rAI. tU- Jl I. Y4 .I.- J" U JU. .LlfJ .Jl t.l arms society'along ard l a .a. t H lat reat 'oulle t andfalrest wt mb rs lt 'ear l. bets reli l pn rt. lnmpnt tb e un- dand exclt ment to. tb tou h howerf tb add otthe e 'upon employers tbe to IUld' atron8 h lng tIgb -l1pped cbaracters.for'baUs b 'ame. anger t-t'oked dr s. -sulted b Jrd wild miys t deI" thy the aP8 bps. da ce tOJJgU "sha el" tators Qt c bt n ha "e 1n uence s \'eral tortunate SlJctetymt'mbers tl as. 1&niUltge.Some "buds" to' even aw. y wasott .t QUnY Eu nia Ken with a Sodetypolled which-taken wi 1m- d p I' .t. rpa coat' eIled iiTe orurr I1der 1Ir th d. nmg lg ,01 comple'terevoiution to nrd et f With soci t"S utof oes nl t professI nal aIm l Idea.- s y an tbo sm\rt 40 .po .y Beet v Ices nd bs do the res j n t mow exa tly M r- years' wI h rmltted n .name 'nef'er Bower 1 it. dancing ran- wen is' now' IUSQul as soc1et hu..1n czeyafj f Jhnif' the De611faftfe j peat PeriZ' 'Hired..D ncing.'Men Wom n Themselves uJO Todd H' .11t fa. Qn410llntI AT. i"enby put. musi ian. bi .ho pital Mrs. ma ea p rarcin truments in colle tion. -AT .ocietyplay. the AND.t bi year'the own'youalt. raco the' pr fea.ional. tI HatI tcener fora pia f a sod 1 P to in fencood P.J InxuJ .was r in tb After antlltoday ke t cn ture Su C1' a1 Se11 nan mol'of life' 'ONew locietyto p r i Iou. i J"oung 2 rls. 611 UftrUncood da 1 iss daD r of' bohemian g&t'e' atm 0 s .1 cue t on- ductJf8 worprs\.Vho EOne.on .e l wI' 'Jobna p oalm.ent d\York 'aocie J m th co turn tr c ud tr i p d b ir own c nJ ng rici y ll-"danclni PAo v' 4mco cl'S ir 4- do s serted. ata from.tl e lea er. .well knOwn clubman. rlck -were tbewlndows -tJ wU'about t e "ed. w nt 'la lfcom. --m1tt tl and'dem n le aM. centlncreise Intheirpay.Of'- sh r sed to' in. ct ge mOtler. the 1 J1pel e Th 8 rted. Dd n sary'to ina c J tQr'twe1 't ehe ew Yort's,1mest po eineti. i t nd. te- storeordel' "Udanclng a.Qoor' 'a d ent Itll1 e. mu c1a11S am n p Ace. &ndthe dAnC'o tb wee hounof ih orChesuAo.a13o' a d show.the ma.de..o W8ltb I. nt b ne ark'I.nospltaL AUhoughone 08t'u1traa.n'a1rsot tieto'l'o nC w re to.d 'U1 nt mctlreet J t1Oa" eI te n.- qa P J\ occaa1oliWU t theamut- e b1 nam- .otthe P"and andappIaudedthe.C1to1 th am eurL mong l ders pe 1l1 t c1 Uni th pa n wereMrL. vtn rit 'A ithoo.J.DreXe1 Jr..Mra. Br i .WMia. "Wllu m'K. Ya der- .bllt..Mrs.-4V 'S. rs" .ChateJL.T1ft' 1 f 'whose nsxn i 1Itand t r Social' M mbeT3"O'Uie'JUD1orLeai Je dan ed\ li arlo sP r:1o p l.ot.the geant. d p ojf II V' ger..oLthe- rth -anc1en'tmu..cica.1 ra ol o C Uect10DCOJ.io iobe oneot dnestinthe. orl -and- when. 'u e e. O was who enthus iu u g e.aerieS djler- l e tthB.tw 'th otth aome &furo 1 musical 'ci les Tbb. did J1oWn e proTedto thoseconcemecl the"JOU c woman.TrhoJasjnst be D. i u ed.1nto world..ot.soc1I.l11teis qutte'uabl.'to a ct nd Hi1ir. the.mott ersaille BroadwajtA"orlt& f& t bet. t r'.84r. 'lItirrqAndemn. w o 11 sp1raUon."F01' ch:1.arebor thhe' p l.e.rra 'eUentl&l.nPerfect hUe pro eas1o 1a.m at the t ibuie. th da eeia Dot'the one.ol 'th t'h b kht out8QC1 1' ntS from',1mderthe bweI.baaket. w.'Frad' JX 4 or tlar..tor'thehllP tY- f s I 4z Mkt d 's G scr w 3 a a' t r MNTi CONSTIUTIONGAZL4SfCTIO oa6e 6d t' war r i dJ I l Y. 1 D i 1 l h t jYy4 il//f ci\ 1 i 1i41 i 11)1 1 I,4 44d4 T h e L c t sir p r. an S sdith to th imi- tator"sof i youngerr i k h d :3 F v 5u 4x rt a n Y.- h Y N dance wit- z t n- ruled. f tk a i it ly s m dance "and .In g Y i eDe& nM'H F'f tY 9 Rft N 2 re y Fi d.FarKri' yr n 4 1f xqtr s 400" t t. 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Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 15 Apr 1917, Sun,
  3. Page 9

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  • Rene Seligman father Albert Seligman

    chris72796 – 08 Sep 2013

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