Atlanta Const 1895

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Atlanta Const 1895 - BY BETSY HAMILTON. Graduating In Homespun...
BY BETSY HAMILTON. Graduating In Homespun Dresses. The time was In ISM and the place was a noted school or girls In Alabama. Out of more than two hundred and fifty pupils representing nearly all of the seceded states there were thirty young ladles who com posed the graduating class. The session was reaching Its 'Close and till the distressing question was not yet Settled "where are the graduating dresses to come from The subject afforded matter for many anxious conversations. It was not only a matter of I but it involved many serious and distressing per- pl xltl s. It was the third year of the war and the supplies for foreign dress goods had been well nigh exhausted in the south. The blockade had shut our few merchants oft from former bases of supplies anJ the little dress material that could be obtain. d In "smuggling through the lines" was held at such exorbitant prices In confederate money that the r.\erate school girl could not afford the "store-bought" outfit. The subject was II discusped among groups of anxious girls as they met and passed In corridors. In music rooms and on the broaj expanse of grassy lawn about the soUnm-looklns buildings. The aressca of our mothers and older sisters which were at all available for our use had already been renovated and remodeled until there was. no choice of style or matt',1 to select from even the sl'.ks. worsteds and line muslins of our grandmothers and groat grandmothers had born brought out from tho musty depths of old hair trunks .n l cedar chests. and aired and ripped arc turned upside own. hind part bi re and wrong chic out. and made over for our .iay host frocks or combined as trinm.r.srs to give a new effect to the old ones which we had perhaps abiding faith In my mother's ability to accomplish the best results from the materials at hand. I had too often seen her surmount dlfflcultles arising from the stringencies the times hence whether my dress would be mistaken for gingham silk or woolen of one thing I felt quite sure that if my mother superintended Its making It would be ttyllsh. But en the other hand It was a matter of no small concern to' her mind as she confessed afterward to having spent several sleepless nights in trying to decide upon the "draft whether It should be Checked fhotted. or "byadier striped and whether it should be dyed with plum roots wa.nm nulls or dried eumac fcr It was hard to color cotton even with the best of -s. She selected a design which was familiarly called by the old women of the country "thread about in the warp and two and two in the filling. A well preserved niece of silk and worsted braid which had done service on a dress of her own long before the war matched the material and was used for trimming ending a desired foreign effect to tfoe garment. Who would know that black "mammy" 'Liza bad carded and spun the thread and that Aunt Susannah had woven the cloth and that my mother had with her own hands cut nd made the elegant costume And BO it was with nearly all of these unique suits no one was ready to believe they were o home manufacture. It chanced to be my very first homespun dress. I had been more fortunate perhaps than most of my classmates in having a brother who was a railroad official and whose position gave him opportunities to procure calicos muslins and other materials so that I was moderately well sup- A SWEET GRADUATE IN HOMESPUN. outgrown. How we enjoyed the pretty "store-bought" effcvts of these antique garments after they were turned and pressed and cut into good style And the secret pleasure of cheating some one Into the belief that the goods had "run the blockade and cost an enormous sum of confederate money. Whenever one was so fortunate as to appear In something new or the old with the new effect the common question was "where did you get your new dress. or th.it pretty ribbon or lace In our class many of the girls were in moderate circumstances and could not be xp td to buy e goods. In view of this fact our l -loved and considerate teacher conceived the happy idea of having each member of the class as he expressed It "throw a garment around herself which would make Jefferson Davis tip his hat" it must be of the confederate homespun home-woven goods made from the home-grown cotton aid dyed with the home dyes and fashioned at home by the hands of our own mothers and sisters. Then came the time for development of skill and ingenuity in the loved ones at home who set about to accomplish the task imposed by the good teacher's suggestion. Then came the carding the spinning the dyeing the weaving the cutting and the making of these graduating gowns for the dear absent girls. T.i-- ch v jjcd in ui" > a pretty piece of dress gooJs in those days was to give the homespun cloth a "store bought" ap pearance. To nave sail trat iliry'i dress Took' an eli-.spp.t gingham worsted or even silk raw silk often being Imitat ed was sufficient praise and compensation for all of the tedious work and time expended upon It. how hignly prized was a hank or so of genuine "Turkey red" thread could the same be found It was can fully arl p.'T.-Tiirvtily us- 1 to make the greatest display sometimes a thread or so tari'ttii ii .nt Wall' .r nii'.r.g. or b.i to brighten the dull leaden-colored home- dyed background or body of the goods an3 again la brier-stitch or herring-bone embroidered edge of collar and cuffs. This neat trimming bad a wonderfully fine effect to\tri relieving toe plafhress ana coarseness of some of the homespun cloth. Sometimes a bright woolen thread was shotted tnrouijh ' r woven ingeniously i represent a dot or line here and there i then a pitc -d ScuK-n plaid or brig1'- cloth of some kind used as trimming gave the garment me desired effect to decieve somebody. Old ribbons and wcrnout garments of gay colored wool or silk were often ray- eleU te.tstd an.l ear.ltii and spun into thread to be u..ve" in .his way. and the effect was both pleasing and mystifying. The .r-- rai-i .iii all sent messages home to d. e her drupes as pretty as 'twos possible to make them. Soma oftthe c'.ass sc- rctiy rebelled against wear- tug so coaoe a.i i unbecoming a garment on such an important day in life's history. Failing to consider the matter from a pa- trl-illc s'.AnJpoint they looked upon it wifh perni 3 a'ucut the same disgust as a bride Yo' jli lava done had uiiu been called upon to wear anything but bridal atfTre on her wcJuir.g day. Their hon-ea boir.g so scattered circumstances diJ net al any concert f action in the matter of uniformity either in color or quality of goods for so many girls the only requisition or .on was that each dress sliDuli oe .he result of home industry and ingenuity. Mothers were therefore forced to exercise their cwa taste and judgment and to employ the best of such materials as they had at hood and it seemed to be the pride of each woman's heart not oniy to please her daughter but to gratify her own am- Eltlon ir. maiiing the praiseworthy garment which would cause our honored president to "lift his hat. How anxiously and eagerly we waited to see those commencement dresses And what marvelous surprises awaited us It was really an experiment with us then this wearing { f homespun on a "swell" occasion. Commeaceonfiii heretofore had been a tlm of "dress parade. when the finest and most becoming suits- were donned and the girls were very apprehensive now that these homespun gowns would not be becoming. I for one however bad an plied hence it had been presumed by some of the girls that I would not comply with our principal's 'request especially as It was not compulsory and a wager was laid to the effect that on commencement occasion I would array myself In the most becoming "store bought" dress I possessed. Totally unaware of this surmise and wager against me I walked proudly into the chapel on commencement morning dressed for the first time in my new homespun frock astonishing even myself with its fine effect for it had at a little distance every appearance of all-wool goods. There was a ripple of excitement whispers ran high among the girls and I a rd one of them say "I told you I knew she would not wear homespun. I humored the joke by feigning not to have overheard the remark. One of the girls purposely took a seat by me and felt the cloth then laughingly whispered to me "It is really homespun but I'll not tell It. because I've lost my bet. Another said "Dear me I have lost a wager on your dress. I said you were too patriotic not to wear homespun on this oc casion but lo here you are au-rayed in fine 'store clothes. The dresses each and all were illustrative of how necessity was e means of developing talent In those times of dis tress and deprivation. They were also an evidence of the ability of our heroic south ern women ti-aceompllah treat things in times of Important emergencies. Not the least wonderful of the developments of those times of poverty and dearth was seen in the genius displayed by skilled "back country" women who brought to such a high degree of perfection the art of adding bright colors to our homespun In the manipulations of different parts of dye yielding plants of our wo ds and fields. Ma of these country women made a regular bud' ness of dyeing threads they had made im portant discoveries in the pursuit of their art. It la needless to say that on this special occasion the. adyide and. assistance of tb mast skilled dyers of each neighbor hood were brought into requisition by our mothers and guairdians. Our appearance on the stage that day was novel anS Interesting. Although our hqme pun gowns were all made chiefly from the same fleecy staple no two. outfits were alike so far as the mere dress went the girls presented an appearance as varied as the plumage of so many birds collected from different countries was due to the variety of dye stuffs used and also to the manner In which toe materials had been woven and U the diverse styles of trt "I "i make my paper too long to give In octsll the surprising delusions of all of these ingeniously wrought costumes though many of them are well worth mention. One trikln gown was green worn by a girl from Mississippi. What became of all of these unique and deftly trimmed costumes Alas when the war ended and the blockade was no more the girls in their eagerness to obtain finer and more becoming goods no longer prized their old homespuns they trafficked them off or threw them aside as not worth the keeping. The fate of each of them might make interesting history but had all of those pretty girls carefully preserved their graduating gowns and placed them in some museum they would doubtless attract more attention today than the costliest raiment of all the queens of the world. Recalling this old-time commencement brings to mind something which I must mention. It is the unique and interesting essay delivered by one of our classmates that day. Her subject was "The Mirror. She was an attractive beauty of the Irish type with black hair "shingled" like a boy's this adding to-the youthful charm of her face. She had large violet eyes with long black lashes touching cheeks resemb ling'the ripe peach in their freshness and glow and pure white teeth between red laughing lips. She was graceful In form and brilliant of mind. An agreeable surprise awaited our class when we were requested to rise while she delivered her remarks to us without manuscript or no to. She dreamed to she said that the spirits had given her her subject and that they opened to her vision a panoramic scene She stood a it were an Immense mirror end beheld reflected in It all the members of her class passing in review before her and as they came one by one it was given to her as a spirit medi um to know the peculiarities and marked characteristics of each. As she spoke she held upon her arm a dainty little basket filled with cut flowers and for each girl whose name she called at the proper time she selected the fitting blossom and presented it and at the same time giving its significance. It was the flower whose emblem told that girl's peon. liar and chief characteristics. Her voice was clear and her language pure and re- fired and she delivered her essay in such a manner as to leave one to suppose that she had the gift or prophecy. And I am sure that in some Instances the fates have propitiated her genius. It was a very lonesome kind of commencement. Our dear girls did not have the usual Incentive to display their most becoming smiles and decorations. The young men their sweethearts and beaux and their fathers and their brothers were not there to admire and appreciate. They were all far away in the war and our audience was composed altogether"of women and children with occasionally an old man and a few boys. Nor did we have the hon or and pleasure of Jefferson Davis's presence which we had so much desired. But we were very highly complimented by a letter from his excellency regretting hi absence and expressing his approval of our patriotism In wearing the confederate cloth and his appreciation of the motive of ob ject. as touching himself and he assured us that he would on that commencement day lift his ha and give three times three cheers for southern graduating gtrts in homespun. BETSY Mr. R ed Was Sore. From The Boston Globe demo Thomas B. Reed in refusing to JolO In the vote of thanks to Speaker Crisp 'manifested a vindictiveness that Is not usual with him. Such action on his part too. was very inconsistent for two years ago he moved suh a vote of thanks to the same speaker himself. It must be that Tom's presidential boom is not growing in a way that suits him. or some other ercat misfor tune has frozen his usual bubbling geniality within him. From The Boston Herald rep. The public was hardly prepared for the exhibition of sensitiveness on the part of Mr. Thomas B. Reed in his refusal to contribute to the vote of thanks to Speaker Crisp. Mr. Reed had been so much in the habit of discharging sharp shot in debate with -his political opponents that It was thought he would not greatly take to heart any return fire on their part. We think a candid estimate of the comparative courtesy and consideration for political opponents ft the two speakers Re cJ and Crisp wouM not be unfavorable to the latter and the 'net that Mr. Crisp was publicly c-ndors.M and complimented by two of the most extreme republicans of the house seems to confirm this view. The Land of Reform. From The New York Sun. There Is not much soil in Massachusetts but It raises the biggest crops of reform to the hill that are known to the census reports. It makes no dlfferi-nce whether a thing is poo or bad. Chang It We must have reform Perhaps one-third of the population spends most of Its time in minding the business of the other two The result is often very clammy and unpleasant but it is reform. If a knot of Massachusetts reformers chouH mar.age to silo by the doorkeeper of rxi.-aJi.s they would organize a landscape reform and moral improvement society there as soon as they got in. SILVER is GEORGIA. Augusta Chronicle The Chronicle always attempts to del fairly with every question and is nlwiys rr-uly to frankly de- Clare its position. The Chronicle spends mljrr.ty little tine on the fence. It is on one side or the other of questions affect- Ing the public interest and to the test of our ability we are ready to give a reason for the Tilth that is hi us and give It without quibbling or without ascribing dishonesty to the man who differs from us. We believe that the n xt democratic platform should declare without equivocation for the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the present ratio and we shell do all within our power to see that the Georgia delegation shall be of the same opinion. If we succeed we Fhal feel that we have done our people a service If we toll we shall at a have the consciousness that we made on honest effort in behalf of 'at we believe to be for the best Interests of the people among- whom we live and the country which we love. LaGrange Reporter The reform of the currency will be from now on the paramount question and. while we cannot forsake democracy for a new organization Ignoring all other questions and pledged to free silver alone we believe that the party should be placed i once irrevocably on the line of bimetallism and stand for what the platform hot-Is out to the people The country must have done with Cleve- landlsm forever. Albany Herald The cloud of uncerta'nty obscures the political chit just now but a rift In the dual in.ll'-ates that the republican party is preparing to swallow the silver bait hook and all. A Narrow Vale. Life Is a narrow vale between the cold And barren peaks of two eternities. We strive- In vain to look beyond the heights We cry aloud the only answer Is the echo of our walling cry. From the voiceless lips of the unreplying dead There comes no word but n the night of death Hope sees a star and listening love can hear The rustle of a wing. These myths were born of hopes and fears and tears. And smiles end they were touched and colored By all there Is of joy and grief between The rosy dawn of birth and death's sad night. They clothed even the stars with passion And gave to gods the faults and frailties Of the sons of" men. In them the winds And waves were music and all the lakes and Streams springs mountains woods and perfumed dells Were haunted by a thousand fairy forms. Robert G. Ing-ersoll. How does Nature Cure Consnmption It's done by building a protective wall around the cavities o the lungs created by the Bacilli Tabercolosa which causes the disease. SLOCUtWS Of COD LIVER OIL with GUAIACOL Not only destroys the Bacilli but by increasing the appetite and improving the digestion of the food it helps the nutrition of the blood and in this way helps nature build this protective wall IS M Rijsisiaiis tailse At all drug stores. A. co. CO. .New York. I 1 9 THE OONBTITUTION A WARTIME COMMENCEM NT IWmX1K Hom .pun wa th tor Its nUnl yo all I 'et I1ttled-"whcrt\ rom distr. lng pln.IUes. or t. rel1 o.ls n aJles ed throu. h p ices r.\ erale sc lool t an o"a th Y anI. paa8 d lI1 sO r u. r te k t n th must p.nd com lneJ r d1 culUes 'ot t up. n 'h ckt'd lIut sumac I' s. w .icb lon etre- t and 11 ot prJ ure :0 HOMESPuN. If the 're presi mone was. 'OU yc r mani' s "xp' bu con l erata hat"-it al t.ashl ne,1 moth rs Ol S S t aC ompli h impo ed 11. T. h { vc" C 1 II to l.irr' dre s L n el'gJ t ed" uJ. n pr.z d o c uld card 'Y'C U gre test .n "r 1ir. u t t lJrig lLen 1. .c1en- ol red h me- k t an brier- tltch jo cun -bad tn brl bt nr h 'If r i pi c cutc'n r garm nt to dtCi ve col0r J ele an. nl t' i w s plea illg .r .l .1.1 Jt 1lI "sages .1\ e drc. t. J. of the c s s J coar e a..G' u h 1I 's t C'l1 ljer -txic 3 afll' Jnt l k J u n t 1e j.i .i1 'i 'rJr wcll.ir. jJ.\ Dir.5' an\ \It lh ullrormity uige5 ll1 dr ss Ir.g Juity. ch S h d SE'em t e w man's plea e r\sl- thc e awajt d .n Comme cp.mtlt "dec s hom pun g wns pre umed wag r commen ement dre sed E head 1 r ally be- ause oc- 'OU 'stor t t UIl1 eroJc .a.ccomPlll\h em nc1es. nd s en dltrer t i w RllY I f o oJe\Zg s b 1 I ecal th adtl lled 4 el 0. n st e an hQmespun IIta ple b rdI 'al a.ndalso t tr d t1et \l surprl ing ing ll1ously ot I story I an I I --tls to. the ling the laugh In manu- I note t. Itoodaa oton 8. ven urn. characterls tics su h .to Ins an es men d lred. hi e ql tlve ph- ha\ ILT x n.edWal su h I' pr ldential cat trJbut" Crl Rt ed 0 cO\lrte y oPP Jnt'nts Reed Crl r. r th -ew T ere so 'f,1 arh"sett8. t e bigg 'St 'e" us vi W th p ulatlon In kl1 t l aclJetts Pl aJis th y land.l'a to a nJ a the t SfL n.R C/ORGJ. Cronicle alwas Evc s to d Is plion- sPds mi:1y ltle tne f..I I que tlons pubJc intlr"st. bsl abiiy ray rE8on t t h t I ad 1 t wloul a crlblg honEsty difIrs bele.e platt m decare eqlvoca- ton trEe conagE al.1 w shpl al wihin pw"r se tb' Georla d lation shal sme I 'llc..ed. rhal Cell ha\ don. Olr 1"0)1. rr'kp fai. shal Ia.'t h'\f ciou"n mJd etort b halt hJeve o th 1' opJe Iva ad 10\ Lrnge r ot. wi pra- whie sk ntw orglz tlon. al plpd .1 frfl' beleve th t thi prty pla el at lne pfple. cantr wih Cleve- Alban unrt ta'ntv obsur.s poltical ff tle inI"ats publcan prepring swalow all Nu01 naow btween br n loo I walng lps un Therp dea th lstening h1ar rstle ters Ad smlea end touced d glet niht stre Wth and fraltie 'men. musc ad al sprngs mountins perfume dels haunte -n Natue Cre Consumpton r Its b buidDf 'e wal aound cvties o. lung crctd Bacii Tubrcuos whch cus te disee. i ijiIIEr MUIsl 'i lm\ I\IV "i\\\ LVER OL wib Bai but appette 2d impovng te digeton fod te nutton blod ad wy nte buid th protectve w J J Te PJsicians Pecrihe a d stre .ASLCMC .l\ Ne Yor I I I i I I I I I 1 1 I I TH ATI n lt Lh I n3 wa lks nd and hsfr or 1 ac- of Um tw Su- I hI r p it I i1-f I W\ilI I'Jk I' l \\fl/ f uc'ji/ eff 'ts d txp-ne iv e 0 ap- na a ! Itk arfuIt er.i" dv display-sometimes tflrs I ii u Wa p r , b ef- an f car l \ gris. av ii 1 v .50 aud t. pcr1js. .i th s ttlon pt re- dis- em woeds lIaty Im- P.nl thg yera to trimming. b I I boy's--this to as herand manner-as au- rnOtlveoT t1S H.UIILTO Reed ha dly th good fetti' n n"xt oa th Ho I bni1din i//5.il \tl'j/Ai.\ I /tif/// f fl5pj u ULV 2rn s' liliY/Jl\/AVj\ OILith ot fo 5' 4 d' 5r. Lc j -a- -i- . . , ( . ¬ , ¬ . , " , ? " ¬ . . - . , . , . " - " ¬ . \ ; " - " . : - . , - . , , , ; ' . . , ? . < . , , ! . - > . , . ; > . ; ; . ' ¬ ¬ . ' ; , , , , , . , ' , ¬ " , " , . " , " , . , ! - . ¬ ¬ " . " , , ( . " " ' ¬ , ¬ , * ? ; . . , , , , ¬ , - . . " - " , ! " , " . , , , " ( , . , ? " : . - ¬ , ¬ , " " , - , - , . , . , ' ¬ . , ¬ , , , . . - _ - : ; , < = " > , " " ¬ . ' - ; ; : > - . . , , ( ¬ ) , . . " " , ! ' . - - : . > . ' . . . . ' . : , , - ; , - , - . . ¬ . . , . ? - , ' - , , . , - , . . . " , ' . . . ( ? . ! . - , : . - , . - . - ' : . \ ¬ ' . ' . - . - . < ' . - ' . , , ; > , ' * . . . - : . , ¬ - / ¬ ; , - . , ' . . , , ¬ . , . ' , : , - . ¬ " . " " ! ! , > " " ¬ . , , ? " . " - - . . , , , ; ' ' , , " " . , ¬ , , - . , : " ; . " ¬ . , , " , ' . ' . " : " , . ¬ , , ! - ' . " " , , ¬ . ¬ . ¬ - ( . " " , ! - . > ' > ' ¬ ; ¬ . . . ¬ . . , . ; , - , > ° " , ° " , . , . ? , , , , ; . , , . - . . " . " , , " " ' - . , , ' , , . . ¬ . , , , ¬ , , * , , , , , , , , ¬ , . , , , , . ' ¬ . , - , . . ¬ . , . , . , ¬ ' . ¬ ' ¬ , . _ , , # , , ¬ . , , , . . . , . . , , ' ¬ . . , . , ? ? . ' . ¬ . , . . . ¬ . . ? . , , , . ' . - . ¬ . . . , . - . ? ! ! - . ¬ - - . . ¬ , . . . - . , . \ . : ? . ¬ - - . . : . - , - , ¬ . ¬ . , ! < - ; , - - ' ¬ - . : ¬ , . ' - , - . : ' - , ; . ' - ¬ . . . - ; ; . , , ; , . , , . ; ' . , " . , , , . . - . ' ? . , , , ? , . . . . , " * - " . . . ! . \ & . & ' _ ' . - ' . ' . { ' ! ) ! - \ ! ) ! ' " \ . . " . ! . { . > ; ; ! ! ( . ; . : . ' . . ! : ' ! . : . . ! ' ! " \ : : - < : - ! : ) ; ; " . : ! ! : . ! , ! ; ! " ! ! ! : ' . - " ' . ' ' ' ' . : , , > ' . ! ! _ : : , . , ( > ' , ' ) . , ' ( ' . . ! " , , ( \ ' " " ( ' ' : ! , ' ' : - < ' - - - - - . ' & . ; " : ' & ! . > " , ' ' " , . . : - ' , ' . ' ' ! " . - < : . % . ' . . & ! , . ' \ ' & . - - - - - ( . : \ , " ' \ - - - = - ' . . . . . ' . . . . ( ) ' " ' ( ' ! } ' ! " } " ' - \ \ " . . : ) ' . ' ' . . , . " ' , , < , . } " ' . ' , . \ \ ' ( > ' . . \ ' ' - " \ ' \ " " , . . ) ' ; , " " " ! . " : ; ; ' " , " , < ; " , " ' ) ' : - ' " . " ) ' } . . " ' ' " . ' . ' , : - . " , , : , ' . . " " . > " ' . \ \ ' . ' : : ! - ' " , ; : ! ! ! ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ; : , : ' ' ) - ' " " ! ; , ' ! ! : , ; , " . : > " . > . . . > , : ; ' : ! . . ; ! , . . ; , : " , ) . . : - [ \ " ' : ' ! ; . ( , , , { ! \ ! > : ; ' ! - : : ! , . , \ ' ! ( , : , ! ) ' > ' . ' \ ' ) ' [ " . . , " . , . " ! " " ( : . ) . " - " . . : ; . . . , , . . : ( : ' ' , \ : : ; . ' ' ! : . , . . . , ) ' ) ( - ' : } ; ( ) < ' ! ; " ' . : . \ ' ' ' : - ) . ' ( . ; : ( . \ . . ( : ' ; . : " \ ' \ . : . . : ; . : ' ; : ) . . . . . : ; . . . : : ! . . . - - . . ' , : - \ ) ' ) ' ! ; : $ : ) ; . ' : : ' ' : ; ; . \ ) : ) " - . . . " : . . ; ; . : : , ) \ , & ' . . ' ! : \ ' ) ' ' " . < : ' } ' . , ' . ' ' \ ' ) . < \ , \ : . ' . \ : ! \ . , . \ . } ' " : : > ; \ ; ; : : / : ; ! \ . ! . . , \ ! : ! : & ; ' . ! & \ ' ! . < . . . . : ! ' ' . ; . . ! ) ' : \ ' " : : : ! . } . ' \ " ) ' : ! ! " . : . . ' - - : : ' ! : . . . . & ' , . , . . . . ' . ! . . . . . . . , . & . ' ' . . \ ' : & ! - - . " ' . . ' , . - - ' . ; . \ \ , . , ! , , . ' - " : . \ . \ ' ' ; ; ' ! ' ! - ' . . / ' ( ' " , , ! > > & ! ( ' " : \ \ ' ; ' " \ < ' . ' , ' , . ' . : " , , } : - : \ ' : ! : : ' , " . : ! ' ' ( ' " ! ' " - ! , < > < \ ' - ( : ; ! ; ( ' ' ; : ! > ) ! , ; ' : : , : ; , \ \ : : " " * ' . . ' > \ " ' ) ' ' . : ; / ; . - ' : ! \ " ' ' - ; " , ; : . . ( ( : " ( ! ! ! . , . : ' " . ' ( ' , ! ' . . \ ' . . " ) . ' " ' ' \ > ( ' ! " , ' " " ' ' ' \ ! . ' ! . ' ' , . . " : ! . . ) . ' . ! ' , ( ' . , - - ! ! ' . . ' ' - - ! ' . \ ' . : ' . ' / ' \ " \ , " " \ \ \ " \ , . : , . \ _ - . - ( ' ! ' ' $ ' , ! - ! ( , ' - - . - . ( ( - , ? . ' - ' ' ' - - - - ( ; ! , \ - " & - ' \ \ ) ( \ ' ' \ \ / ! ' / ( \ ' ' ; - & ; ' . , - , . - - , ; , " . ; , - . - , ' , ; ' ' ; ; ) ' ; ' ; ' . ; ; - " ; ; ) , ; . , ; - , ; ; . ; ; ; - ' ; ' - ' - ' ' ' - ' - - . . - . % . . . ' - - - : . . , ' - - - ' . , - , - ' " \ ' - ' ' - ' . " - ' ; - ! " - , ' - ; . ' . ' - : ' - ' - , - ' : / / . , , \ , ' / . \ \ / / , / / / " _ : : : _ _ _ _ ' _ ' _ / / \ & ' . ' " ! ! . - , - - - -

Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 10 Mar 1895, Sun,
  3. Page 2

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  • Atlanta Const 1895

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