HD1.1

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HD1.1 - BY BETSY HAMILTON. Graduating In Homespun...
BY BETSY HAMILTON. Graduating In Homespun Dresses. The time was In ISM and the place was a noted school or girls In Alabama. Out of more than two hundred and fifty pupils representing nearly all of the seceded states there were thirty young ladles who com posed the graduating class. The session was reaching Its 'Close and till the distressing question was not yet Settled "where are the graduating dresses to come from The subject afforded matter for many anxious conversations. It was not only a matter of I but it involved many serious and distressing per- pl xltl s. It was the third year of the war and the supplies for foreign dress goods had been well nigh exhausted in the south. The blockade had shut our few merchants oft from former bases of supplies anJ the little dress material that could be obtain. d In "smuggling through the lines" was held at such exorbitant prices In confederate money that the r.\erate school girl could not afford the "store-bought" outfit. The subject was II discusped among groups of anxious girls as they met and passed In corridors. In music rooms and on the broaj expanse of grassy lawn about the soUnm-looklns buildings. The aressca of our mothers and older sisters which were at all available for our use had already been renovated and remodeled until there was. no choice of style or matt',1 to select from even the sl'.ks. worsteds and line muslins of our grandmothers and groat grandmothers had born brought out from tho musty depths of old hair trunks .n l cedar chests. and aired and ripped arc turned upside own. hind part bi re and wrong chic out. and made over for our .iay host frocks or combined as trinm.r.srs to give a new effect to the old ones which we had perhaps abiding faith In my mother's ability to accomplish the best results from the materials at hand. I had too often seen her surmount dlfflcultles arising from the stringencies the times hence whether my dress would be mistaken for gingham silk or woolen of one thing I felt quite sure that if my mother superintended Its making It would be ttyllsh. But en the other hand It was a matter of no small concern to' her mind as she confessed afterward to having spent several sleepless nights in trying to decide upon the "draft whether It should be Checked fhotted. or "byadier striped and whether it should be dyed with plum roots wa.nm nulls or dried eumac fcr It was hard to color cotton even with the best of -s. She selected a design which was familiarly called by the old women of the country "thread about in the warp and two and two in the filling. A well preserved niece of silk and worsted braid which had done service on a dress of her own long before the war matched the material and was used for trimming ending a desired foreign effect to tfoe garment. Who would know that black "mammy" 'Liza bad carded and spun the thread and that Aunt Susannah had woven the cloth and that my mother had with her own hands cut nd made the elegant costume And BO it was with nearly all of these unique suits no one was ready to believe they were o home manufacture. It chanced to be my very first homespun dress. I had been more fortunate perhaps than most of my classmates in having a brother who was a railroad official and whose position gave him opportunities to procure calicos muslins and other materials so that I was moderately well sup- A WARTIME COMMENCEM NT IWmX1K Hom .pun wa th tor Its nUnl yo all I 'et I1ttled-"whcrt\ rom distr. lng pln.IUes. or t. rel1 o.ls n aJles ed throu. h p ices r.\ erale sc lool t an o"a th Y anI. paa8 d lI1 sO r u. r te k t n th must p.nd com lneJ d1 culUes 'ot t up. n 'h ckt'd lIut sumac I' s. w .icb lon etre- t and 11 ot prJ ure ATI n lt Lh I n3 wa lks nd and hsfr or ac- of Um tw Su- . . , ( . ¬ , ¬ . , " , ? " ¬ . . - . , . , . " - " ¬ . \ ; " - " . : - . , - . , , , ; ' . . , ? . < . , , ! . - > . , . ; > . ; ; . ' ¬ ¬ . ' ; , , , , , . , ' , ¬ " , " , . " , " , . , ! - . ¬ ¬ " . " , , ( . " " ' ¬ , ¬ , * ? ; . . , , , , ¬ , - . \ & . & ' _ ' . - ' . ' . { ' ! ) ! - \ ! ) ! ' " \ . . " . ! . { . > ; ; ! ! ( . ; . : . ' . . ! : ' ! . : . . ! ' ! " \ : : - < : - ! : ) ; ; " . : ! ! : . ! , ! ; ! " ! ! ! : ' . - " ' . ' ' ' ' . : , , > ' . ! ! _ : : , . , ( > ' , ' ) . , ' ( ' . . ! " , , ( \ ' " " ( ' ' : ! , ' ' : - . ' & . ; " : ' & ! . > " , ' ' " , . . : - ' , ' . ' ' ! " . - < : . % . ' . . & ! , . ' \ ' & . ! ' ' $ ' , ! - ! ( , ' - - . - . ( ( - , ? . ' - ' ' ' - - - -

Clipped from
  1. The Atlanta Constitution,
  2. 10 Mar 1895, Sun,
  3. Page 2

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