Boston Post from Boston, Massachusetts · Page 7Click to view larger version
August 28, 1889

Boston Post from Boston, Massachusetts · Page 7

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Boston Post i
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Boston, Massachusetts
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Wednesday, August 28, 1889
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BOSTON POST, WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 23, 1SSO beinjj made at steady price«. We quote Eastern i o"20c; fancy near bv stock higher; li extra Vermont an<l New Hampshire, 19@20c: Nova Scotia ami New Brunswick, 17c; Prince Let ward Islands. 17c; fresh Western. 1732C; Michigan choice, 17¥j®18c; Canadas, I7(gil7vm. Jobbing: price le higher. New York—The market is steady; Western firsts, 18® 18 'sc. Chicage—fcggs are steady at 14s*c. Kean»—The offerings oi white beans are large, and a quiet demand is reported, lo force large sales concessions have to be given. California and foreign beans are quiet and steady. Yellow eyes are scarce, and nave a quiet demand at extreme prices. We nuotoi Choice sni&ll Now \ork n&iid* picked pea. §2 40^2 50 hush; johoice New York large hand-picked, 92 20®- 30; small Vermont hand-picked, $2 60i»2 6ft; choice screened pea, $2t<*.2 20; hand-picked, medium. $2 35®2 40; choice screened, $2 fe2 20; choice yellow eyes, $3 65@3 75; Cali- forina pea beans. $2 25«2 35; red kidneys. 25; Lima, tkauJ ac i*1 lb; foreign medium. SI GtX&l 70; foreign pea, $2 20. Jobbing prices 10c higher. Choice Canada pea^, $l <i l 10; common. 80c@$l; Northern green. SI 10« 1 25; Western. SI 40« 1 50 Poultry—The receints of tlressed poultry are not so large, and a steadylmarket is reported. Ducks ate «juiet and steady. It takes a choice live fowl to bring over 11c. We quote fresh killed spring chickens, North and Eastern choice, 10 I Sc; fair to good. 13®15c; fowls, choice, 14c; green ducks, 13c; iced Chickens. 12Va@13c: fowls, 12Vac; live fowls, 10@llc; chickens. 10« l2c; ducks, 10«11c. l’otatoes—The receipts of potatoes are not so large, and the market is gradually working into a better condition. The receipts are expected to be smaller for the rest of the week. The arrivals have not improved any m quality, still being green, and showing signs of rot. We quote New Hampshire rose and hebrons. 50c; Aroostook hebrons, 45c; Aroostook rose, 40@45c; Houlton rose, 40«} 45c; Houlton hebrons, 50c; Vermont rose and hebrons, 35« 40e; New York Burbanks. 35@ 40c: New York white stars. 40c +> bush; native rose and hebrons, SI 25® 1 50 bbl. Sweet Potatoes—The receipts are larger, and there is a good supply on hand. Nor- iolks sell at $2 50^2 75 bbl. with Jerseys at S3@3 25. Red lots sell at §1 50&2 00 4* M»1- ^ , . Hav and Straw—The receipts of choice hay are small, and the supply on hand is not verv large. A fair demand is reported. There is not much doing in the common grades. Haw straw is quiet and unchanged. We quote choice prime hay, $ 18 ^ 3 ? 3 8 50; some fancy higher ; fair to good, SI»>.«2 17 ¡East line, $14@15: poor to ora. $10® 14; East swale. $10; rye straw, choice, $l&glU 50; oat straw', $8 gii). ________ TRUCK. The market is well supplied and trade is very quiet. We quote as follows; Egyptian onions. $150 & crate; red onions, $1 75a> 2 00 |p> bag; Malta, SI 75a2 25 fc* basket; native onions. 7oc bush, SI 75 bbl; Spanish onions, SI P* crate; beets, 35c V box; carrots, 50c box: lettuce. SI.25 4? box; native turnips. 50c P box; native yellow, 6C*s>75c V box; native cucumbers, 75c 100 count; peppers, 60c bush; pickles, 121/9®16c F bush; parsley. 25c & bush; cranberry beans, SI; shell beans, SI @1 25 bush; native wax beans, Slfil 25 4^ bush; green pole,SI box; civey beans, $1 25 V bush ; Lima beans, S2®2 50^ bush; green corn. $1 75@2 00 Fbbl; tomatoes, 20@ 35c p bush; native cabbage, S3¿4 p 100 count; red cabbage, 75c P box. Native marrow squash sells at 75c@$l i* bbl, with turban at SI 2o P bbl. CaulilTowers are quiet at SI doz. Egsr plant sells at $2®2 25 P doz. Kalamazoo celery sells at 20«t25c bunch, with native lots at SI 50 i* doz. WEDNESDAY’S TRAIN. The train consists of 12 cars of peaches, 1 car fruit and 1 car sweet potatoes. FRUIT. Apples—The receipts are larger, and there is only a fair supply of choice eating lots. There is a good, lair demand for this kind of fruit. Common lots are dull and plenty. We quote: Astrachans, S2 50g2 75; Williams, $3@3 50; pippins. $2 50@2 75; sweets, S2@ 2 50; common. $1 ¿¿1 50: Gravensteins, S3 50® 4 00 P1 bbl; Western mixed lots sell at $2® 2 50 bbl. Oranges and Lemons-The supply is small, and prices are firm, sales being made at $4 @5 t? box for Messina and Palermo oranges, and $4®7 box for Messina and Palermo lemons. Pears—The market is well supplied, and a steady demand is reported for choice lots. •Jersey Bartletts sell at $2(®3 bbl. with New Yorks at 82 50«3 00. Choice native Bartletts are in small supply, and prices are iirm at $4®5 bbl. Clapp’s Favorite have a steady sale at S3@3 50 ■£> bbl. Comm-m pears sell at about $2 bbl. Cantaloupes— A steady demand is reported at $1 50® 1 75 bbl for Norfolk« and $1 75® 2 00 for Jerseys. Sales of native lots are made at S2 50 bush, with Rhode Islands at $3® 4 $> bbl. Muskmelon»—The demand is fair, with a fair supply at SI 50 P obi. Blueberries—i'lie receipts are smaller, and a quiet trade is reported at 7@1 lc quart. Blackberries—A steady demand is reported at 7l£l lc P quart. Huckleberries—Sales are made at the same prices as blackberries and blaeberries. Peaches—Tbe supply consists of some lots left over from yesterday ana a few lots by ex press.Delaware whitessold at SI 25® 1 50,with yellows at S2®2 25 P basket. A few fancy York States arrived in crates and sold at S2® 2 50 “P1 two-basket crate, with some fruit in peck baskets at 60@65c each. Cranberries— Cape Cod cranberries are in small supoly and have a slow sale at Sit* crate. Grapes—The demand is steady, with most lots in fair condition: sales are made at low prices. Delaware Moore’s early are quoted at 60®65c 10-lb basket. Sales of New York champions are made at 35@40c P 10-tb basket, with Hudson River Hartfords at 25@30c 6-tb basket. Jersey Ives are quoted at 35®40c V 10-lb basket, with cases at §2®2 25 24-basket case. New York champions by the carrier sell at 5®6c P lb. Sales of York State Delawares axe made at 75c 6-th basket. Watermelons—The supply is ample. The demand is quiet, sales being made at prices ranging from 15c to 30c each. Bananas — The market is steady, with a fair demand. We quote Jamaica at SI® 2 25; Baracoa at $1®1 25 for yellows, and &0o®!$l for reds; Port Limons. $1 75 P bunch. The steamer Tordenskiold arrived today ■with Banes bananas for Seaverns & Co. No Is sold at $1 75. and No 2s at $1 #> bunch. Plums—The market is well supplied, and a little improvement is noted in the condition of the market. Outside prices are obtained quicker than they were yesterday. A fair demand is reported. We Quote Bradshaws at 50 ®75c P 10-ib basket; damsons, 50®75c; Niagaras, at 75®80c; Quackenbos, 50®60c: green gage. 40®50c. Sales of crate lots are made at 60®65c. Native lots in quart boxes sell at 8c per box. Seeley’s Vine Valley plums have commenced : to arrive. Sales were made at $2 50 P case. PROVISIONS. The receipts today have been as follows: Tallow. 8pkgs; beef. 101 bbls;pork, 245 bbls; lard, 515 pkgs; hams, 20 tierces; preserved % meats, 300 cases ¡bacon, 100G boxes. Same time I last year: Tallow, 57 pkgs; beef, 10 bbls; pork, 7 bbls; lard, 1515 pkgs; hams, 181 bbls; I 250tierces; bacon, 2357 boxes; preserved > meats. 900 cases. Pork and Pork Products —A good, fair demand is reported both for home use and for export. Prices are steadv and are well sustained. We quote; 'Long cuts, §13 75®14 25; short cuts, S13 50®14 00; 1 backs, $14®14 50; lean ends, §14; pork I tongues, $18; prime mess, $14; extra mess, $13 50; mess, $13; fresh ribs, 9®yVac; sausages, OVac; bologna sausages, 7c; lard, choice, 714@73/8c p ib in tierces and tubs; 10-lb pails in cases, 7Vsc; 5-lb, 734c; 3-lb, Sc; bams, 11c; small, 12c; smoked shoulders, 8c; corned. 7 V 2 C; smoked ribs, 8c; boneless breakfast bacon, 11 Vac; pressed ham, 11 % c; choice city dressed hogs, 6l/ic; country. 6%c. New York—Pork steady; sales, 300 bbls. Beef dull. Beef hams steady. Tierced beef steadier: city extra India mess,$12 50® 14 00; sales. 100 tierces at $12 50. Cut meats dull; sales, 5000 lbs pickled bellies, 12 tbs, 6Vac 10,000 tbs pickled bellies, 11 lbs, 6% c; pickled shoulders. 46/s®4!?ic; pickled haras, 10%® 11V4C. Middles quiet; short clear, $5 45. Lard, new crop quiet and steady; sales, 1500 tierces Western steam, chiefly export, $6 36® 6 42V2; closing at $6 42Va; 80 tierces citv, $ 0 ; refined, moderate demand; Continent, $<> 40®« 80: South America, $7 25. Chicago—Mess pork active, but steady at $0 75. Lard hrm at $G 02 Vz&G 05. Short ribs sides steady at $4 85. Dry salted shoulders steady; short clear sides steady. St Louis—Provisions firmer. Pork, jobbing, $10 25. Lard firmer, $5 75. Dry salt meats— Shoulders, $4 50®4 02Va ; longs and ribs, $5 12Va; short, (dear, $5 30®5 35. Bacon —Shoulders, $5 62Va ; longs and ribs. $5 75® 5 85; short clear, $5 95®t> 05. Hams, $11 25 ©13 25. Cincinnati—Pork easier, $10 62Ms. Lard auiet, $5 95Ms. Bulk meats steady; short ribs. $5 10@5 15. Bacon—Demand moderate; short clear. $4 25. Corned Beef and Tontcues— The demand is quiet, with a fair supnly. We quote extra plate and extra family beef, $8 50®9 00; nlate, $8 50; extra mess, $8; mess, $7; beet hams, $14 50; beef tongues, p bbl, $18, half-bbl, $9 50; tripe, half-bbl, $3 25. Fresh Beef—Choice cattle are scarce, and bring full prices. Light and medium cattle are plenty, and are not very active. We quote choice steers, 7Vac P lb; good, 7@7Vic; light, 6Va@6>4c; extra heavy hinds, 10Mivffil0a/4c; good, 10@101-4c; light, heavy fores. 4 V 3 C; common to good, 3:i*®4c; light. 3«3Vac; rattles. 2V 2 a 3 ^c; chucks, 3 « 4c; backs, 5®0c; rumps, 8®! 12c; rounds, ft®7c; rumps and loins, 11® 15c; short ribs. lo®14c; loins, ll®18c. other Fresh Meats—A fair demand is reported, with an ample supply. We quote choico spring lambs. 10® 12c; others, ft®9c. Fall, choice. 9¿9Vac; others. 5®8c. Chicago mutton, choice, 9®9Vac; yearlings, 8® 9c; choice heavy Brighton, 0@9Vac; Eastern, choice, 8®9c; Eastern veal, fancy, 10®llc; others, 5®9c; choice Brighton, lo<® 1 lc. Tallow—The market is quiet and unchanged: city rendered selling at 4 '/s®4s,ic. New York—The market is stronger; city ($2 for pkgs), 43/4@4 13-1 8 C. HOG AND CATTLE MARKET. Stock Yards, Kansas City—[Special]—Cattle —Receipts, 4583. The market is steady. Shipping steers, $3 50®4 25; native cows. $1 50 @2 10; mixed butchers’ stock, $1 50(®2 00; stockers and feeders, $2 40®3 00; range cattle. $2 20®2 50. Hogs—Receipts, 3657; the market is steady; heavies. $3 60®3 85; mediums and lights, $3 60®4 20; pigs, $t I7l/a ®4 27Va. Sheep—Receipts, 406; the market is steady at $3 40®3 90. Cincinnati—Hogs, good demand; stronger; common and light. $3 50®>4 40; packing and butchers’, $4 10;®4 35; receipts, 1400; shipments, 300. Chicago—Cattle—Receipt«, 8500; shipments, 1500; beeves, $4 40®4 75; steers. S3®3 50; stockers and feeders, $1 90®;$ 00; cows, bulls and mixed, $1 25®3 00 ; Texas cattle. Si 25®3 20; natives and half-breeds. $3@3 60. Hogs—Receipts. 10.600; shipments, 4500; weak; mixed, $3 80®4 35; heavy, $3 60®4 15; light, $4@4 65; skips, $3 50®4 40. Sheep—Receipts, 7000: shipments. 2000; steady; natives, S3 50@4 60; Western feeders, $3 40@3 90; muttons, $3 80 ®4 10; Texans, S3 50®4 10; lambs, $4 50® 4 75. _______ • COTTON. In New York cotton is steady, with a quiet demand; sales, 842 bales; uplands, ordinary, 83,*c; good ordinary, 83/sc; low mid, 11 1-I6c; middling. llVsc; Gulf ordinary. 9c; good ordinary, 103/sc; low middling, 11 15 6c; middling, ll%c. Futures opened steady and closed quiet and steady. The following table gives the opening and closing auotatious, with the closing of yesterday *oUl 178 larrh*, averagd 70 lt>s, at di’. S M Flint sold 90 lambs, average 58 lbs, at *%<-.; «0 sheen at 4«'*«; IS skippers at 'ìc. A K lilaisdeTl sold 22 fclieep, 1720 Tbs, at 8 c; 114 lainhs at g» l»0 per hea/t. L Morse 40 la mbs, at j?4 1 2 Va V rREPAKl!I* F4»C»I>. [from the Portland Globe.] it iiiuoA as. ALWAYS ON TIME OpeningClosingClosing A ug. 27.Ana. 27.Allí. 2¡». August ............ ..........10.57c10.57c 10.63c September... ___10.42c I 0 .i 6 u10.47c October..... ......... 10 . 10 c 10 . 1 5c10.14C November....... 9.91c9.94c9.93c December ......... 9.90c9.93c9.91c January......... .... 9.94c 9.97c9.95c February.... .......... 10 . 00 c10.03c 10 . 02 c March ............. .......... 10 otic 10.09c 10 08c April .............. ___ 10 . 12 c10.16c 10.15c May................. ..........10.1IV.10.23c 10 . 21 c June ................. .........10.25c10.29c 10.26c IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. IMPORTS, AUG. 27. 1889. ANTWERP. Steamer Rialto—4847 cases 31 nkes window glass Baring t:ros co—771 cases do do John Munroc A co—8727 cases 53 pkgs do do 2 cases plate do liartng Hros A co —1240 bales wood palp liarnc of brlttsh North America—100 bale* ra«s 46 do new do 104 ao ba«ntng 75 do flar. waste J 11 Moor* co—431 do rags Harlne tiro* ,t co—84 do old paper and books 109 do rags .1 li Moors Jt eo- 3 bbls grease C W (ieller — 6 caj* s arms John 1’ Lovell Arms co~ 11 cask* mdse lease china Peabodv * W'hitney —1000 bbls cement Ktske, Coleman * co-^-20 hhds cauitflower E T Cowdrey it co—20 casks manganese E *te b’ King & co~10 chniitware Abram French .t co—13 cases albums Hongbtoii A; Dutton—17 bales jtaildln«* Cumner. Jones co-24 cjisks wine .lacob Wlrth-^1 case rabbit skins White liros—1 cask dry colors Putnam <fc Foley- 5 pieces red marble . I W’iutts—33 cases'! bbls earlben- ware Abram French A eo—13 case* toy* Jordan,Marsh co- in <to do 1» Schwartz-1 ao do Horace Partridge * eo —1 ca'e silk cloth lioston Rubber co—54!i3 colls wire rods 58 steel foreings 15 bars steel 90 cases window glass 10 casks potash 20 bbls alazarlne 330 bags beans 8 cases cutlery <>rde.-. From Newcastle, Eng—14 crlndntone» Lomuarii X, co—19 sheets lead Yarmouth Steamship co- 200 bbls Venetian red order. LlVERPOOi., Eng. Steamer Venetian—240 bales rags 107 casKs bleaching powders 101 do soda ash Paring Bros <s co—30 bales old bagging 277 coils 51 bdls old rope .1 11 Moors A co—10 ca^ks ainm.mia 156 tierce* bleaching powder« Linder it Meyer—60 pkgs 1 case gla.*s 1! > herburne—3 cases 98 bdls 36 boxes steel James Skinner—I case mdse F Wight—101 casks soda ash Morey co—2 cases wire Jere Abbott <fcco—fit bars 10 bdls Iron E Y Jscobson—43 hags camels’ hair Providence Mills—3 cases md*e Stone <V. Downer—3 do window glass Lambert Uros—I c;ise plate glass It Sherburne—1500 sacks salt Thayer it Lincoln—9 cases mdse Boston Book co ~ lo5 pkgs 1 parcel do Thos Leyland co—3 bales linen Willtston, Knight A co—1 mdse ( has A Vlnal A, co—10 bbls do J A & \V Hird&co-318 cases do Kidder, Peabody A co—288 pkgs machinery Riley Gray—210 do do ti A l.elgh ,fc 905 bdls wire rods Washburn A MoenManfco—fi uses magnesia Oilman Hros —6 bales seed W W Kaw- son A co—1 case hats O E Leavens A co—226 pkgs lse Stoddard, Levering <fc co —6 casks china clay inmmill At OUlespie—I dog E II Moore—10 quartet:asks wine 380 casks china clav 60 tierces 640 bags >da ash 80 tons salt IIS bales paper stock 44U2 bars iron 137 coils old rope 2000 sacks salt order. BANES, Cuba. sieamer Tordenskjold — 5000 bunches bananas Seaverns J l co. vLiiOA BAY. Brig Brage—782 bales wool 60,772 lbs old iron Gillespie, Patterson co. EXPORTS, AUG. 27. 1S80. PA SPEBIAC, t’Q. Brl>; •85”—1248 bbls flour—65 bbl s pork—10 bbls oeet—25 bbls pitch—26 bbls refined oil. WINDSOR, NS. Seh Boniface—250 bbls flour. YARMOUTH. NS. Steamer Yarmouth—2 bales wool 125 bbls tlonr—2 chains—2 sachors—350 bbls meal- 30 u^gs hardware—20 bbls Kerosene-1 case linuergas 175 watermelons—2 bbls tonic—40 bojtes oranges— 30 boxe* lemons—25 boxes bananas—10 boxes 5 bbls ¡»ears— 20 bbls apides -10 bbls onions —20 boxes toma- -20 basket* grapes—15 baskets peaches—200 berry rates. HELL, Eng, via New York. Steamer Hindoo (cleared ui 24>—100 bales cotton waste—50 bbls dyestnffs—1 do extracts —-100 cases canned lobsters—30 do paiat— 3 bbls bladder lard. La S(;0\V, Scot. steamer Hibernian (cleared Aug 41—71^8 sacks flour—2356 do oil cake—24.224 busa orn—120 Merces 1000 pails lard—25 hhds 25 tierces allow—137 hhds tobacco—40 bales leather—2 organs backboard —10 bbls ink—I case fishing rods —1 do Eists—553 empties—3200 pieces staves—210.010 tbs Cheese—50 boxes 26 tierces bams—50 bbls pork trimmings—503 cattle. ELEANOR UK’S LETTER New York & New Endand ARSENIC AS A MEDICINE. Sales.. . 59.300 bales In Liverpool cotton is quiet, n ith a limited demand; middlings, 6 9-16d; low middlings. 63sd; good ordinary. 6Vsd; ordinary, 5 13-16; sales, 6000 bales; American, 4800 bales; receipts, 1000 bales; American, 600 bales. Futures opened steady and closed steady. Opening Closing Closing Aug. 27. Aug. 27. Aug. 26. August .......................... 6 35 - 64,1 6 31 64d 6 35-64d August-September... 6 S5-64d 6 3t-64d 6 35-64d September-October . .5 t>0-64il 5 57-tl4<l 5 6i)-64 Í October-November... 5 45-641 5 43-64d 5 44-64a Novetnber-December .5 39-H4d 5 37-64d 5 38-64d December-.!anuary .. 5 36-64d 5 36-64d 5 33-64d January-Fei)ruary .. 5 37-Gld 5 3(>-64<l 5 36-64U February-March ___5 36-64d 5 36-64d 5 36-64d September................... 6 31-64d 6 31-64.1 6 35-64U The other market« were as follows: Augusta—Net receipts 5. gross 5; shipments 36; stock 75; firm; mid 1 lc. (2 new bales.) Galveston—Net receipts 1137, gross 1137; sales 270; Stock 6164; quiet; mid IIV 4 C. New Orleans—Net receipts 461, gross 727; exports to Great. Britain 692; sales 15; stock 3818; steady; mid lli/gc. (114 new bales.) Mobile—Net receipts 398. gross 398; exports coast- wis-:216; sales 50; stock 381; easy; mid 11c. (182 new bales.) Memphis—Net receipts 10, gross 10; stock 1208, quie'; mid 11 c. Savannah—Net receipts 1577. gross 1577; exports coastwise 134, sales 275; stock 4398; dull; mid 10 Vac. Charleston—Net receipts 4. gross 4. exports coasts wise 31; stock 85; steady; mid 10a/*c. Wilmington—Net receipts 32, gross 32; stock 16; firm; mid HV 4 C. Norfolk—Net receipts and gross none; stock 89; Steady; mid 11 V*e. West Point—Net receipts 202, gross 202; exports coastwise 202 . Philadelphia—Net receipts and gros* none; stock 480ti; firm; mid 115 /hc. Baltimore—Net receipts 616. gross 6 ie; exports coastwise 75; stock 1036; quiet; firm; mid 115/rc. New York—Gross receipts 1194, exports to Great Biitain 765; France 876; Continent 68 ; stock 47.808. Cincinnati—Net receipts 10, gross 10; stoik 1675; steady; mid 1114 c. ■*>t Louis— Net receipts 208, gross 208; shipments 307; stock 615; quiet; mid 1 lc. Louisville—Quiet: mid 1 ia/sc. Consolidated—Net receipts tor four nays 1140; exports to Great Biltaln 5603; to France 876; to Con- tiueutlU7; stock 68,741. SUGAR AND MOLASSES. Sugar—Receipts today, none; same day last year, 920 hhds. Raw sugars are dull and unchanged. We quote: Cuba, fair to good retining, 6@6Vsc: centrifugals, 06° test 63/4c; Manilas, 47/8@5%c; Iloilos, 6 ^ 0 Vsc Javas. Nos 10 to 11. 03/ic. Retined sugars are having a good demand at old prices. We quote: Pulverized. 85/8(a3%c; powdered. 8V 2 «¿SVsc; granulated, HlA@8s/s c; confectioners’ A, 8 7-16c ; standard A, 814c; Belmont A, 7%c; extraC, 7%@7%c; yellow. 6%@7Vfec. Wholesale grocejs’ price, 8 V 2 C for granulated. New York—Raws are nominal, with retined tinn and in fair demand. Molasses—Receipts today, none; same day last year, 1 bbl. The market is steady and nominal. We quote; Fancy Ponce, 43c ^gal; choice, 40§41c; fair to good, 36@ 39c; Cien fuegos, 28 « í 31 c ; Barbadoes, 34c; boiling grades, 60° test, SOVssc. New York—The market is quiet and nominal. THE OIL MARKET. [Furnished by J E Carter <fc Co, 221 Washington street.] PIPE LINE CERTIFICATES. Closed. Aug 26. 1889....................................................98 Opened, 10 a m, Aug 27 ............................................98' Highest, Aug 27................................................................OSVí» Lowest, Aug 27............................................................... 9 Closed, Aug 27.............................................................973/s COTTONSEED OIL CERTIFICATES. Closed. 3 pm. Aug 26. 18S9......................................51% Opened, 10 am, Aug 27..............................................517/s Highest. Aug 27 .............................................................53 1-iOwest, Aug 27................................................................51'<4 Closed, Aug 27............................................................... 507/5 MISCELLANEOUS. Coffee—New York—Rio is quiet; fair cargoes. I 8 V 2 C. Whiskey—The Western markets are steady at $1 02. Turpentine and Petroleum — New York— Turpentine closed at 44@44Vsc, with rosin at SI 05@1 10, and tar at $2 75, while petro leum closed at 7.60c, with RSW at 7.20c, and cases at 9.10c. WATERTOWN UNION LIVE STOCK MARKET. Reported for the B oston Post by George ,1. Fox, for the week ending Aug. 27, 1889. AMOUNT OF LIVE STOCK AT MARKET. Sheep Cattle. and lambs. Swine This week..........................3,347 6 , 6(<2 22.1 Last week..........................5,114 7,522 16,561 One year ago ...................1,728 8.308 1.333 PRICES OF MARKET BEEF. A tew choice, g 6 a )6 50; extra, $5 50@5 75; first quality, $5@5 25; second quality, ¡ft4 50.o>4 75; ttur quality, # 4 (g >4 25. PRICES OF STORE CATTLE. Working ox -n. $ pair, from $70(a)160; farrow cows S12@30; fancy cows. jjS50®75; milch cows and calves from #125@48; yearlings, $ 8 ® 16; two-year-olds, J12® 25; three-year-olds, g20@35f Western fat swine, live 4@4*4c; Northern dressed bogs, 51/4C. PRICES OF SHEEP AND LAMBS. In lots, g2(j»3@3 50 each; extra, Jji4@5. or from 2 f^> 5c lb; spring iambs, 41 / 2 ^ 60 ; veal calves, 2@53/i PRICES OF HIDES, TALLOW AND SKIN'S. Brighton hides, 4@6ViC th; tallow, 3@4c 5« lb country bides, 4@4Vijc lb; tallow, 2 @ 2 V3c lb pelts. 50@80c each; calfskins, 5c '¡¡'i lb; dairy skins 16i*o0c. UNION MARKET. WATERTOWN. A good run of Northern and Eastern cattle. There was something wanting in ihe wav of fine goods, and butchers bought and paid full prices for such grades For heifers the market was off 14 c ft, and steers sell iug but little better than heifers. We found sales light cattle at 2:,4@3V4c 1 w. Some Eastern cattle (fancy» at 6 @ 6 i/ 2 C; some from New Hampshire at same range. Not many of these fancy cattle required within the week, still the few bring good prices. J A Hathaway sold Western steers from 3Vi@4 1 ^4c 1 w. THE SHEEP CALL Country lots arrive as fr ely as last week and less activity to the trade, and prices ruled easier by Vic with 6 .; about the top market price. Canada lambs arc looking finely and claim especial attention. 1 s La vine FOREIGN MARKETS. LONDON, Aug 27—1 p in—Cargoes off the coast wheat quiet; three cargoes waiting sales. Cargoes on ttie passage and for shipment, wheat quiet; corn ather easier. At Mark Lane, wheat quiet. English ind French country markets quiet. At Liverpool spot wheat quiet; corn rather easier at 3s 9:<*d. Weather in England, generally tine. Wheat and flour on the passage to »lre.it Hritain. 1,962,000 quarters; corn, 483,oOO quarters. Wheaton the passage to the ,'ontlaent, 244,0t)0 quarters; corn, 160,000 quarters. p m—At Liverpool, wheat futures and corn futures firm; No 1 California wheat for August, 7s0V.jd; do for October, 7s Id; do for November, 7s Id; ao for December. 7sOVjd; do for January, 7a0i/>d; mixed American corn for August, 4 sOl/ 2 d; do for September, 4s oM;d; do for October, 4s OL.^d. LIVERPOOL, Aug 27—1 p m—Breadstuffs— Wheat quiet; demand poor; holders offer moderately. Corn easy; demand poor at 3s 9%d@4.s OV^d. Quotations—Winter wheat lower at 6 s 10d®6s 1 Id spring wheat lower 7s 1 V 2 dtff) 7 s '¿V>jd; club wheat steady at. 7s ld@7s IVsd; mixed American corn quoted at 4s 0 3 /id. Peas as before at 6 s 3Vsd. Provisions etc—Pork, prime Eastern steady at 60s. Bacon at ."2 9<l tor short clear and 3ls tor long clear. Cheese lower at 4;is 6 d. Tallow steady at 25s 9d. Lard firmer 32r.. Weather cold ami rainy. Wheat receipts, 168,000 centals, of which 77.000 centals are American. Re ceipts of corn, 83,700 centals. BOOT AND SHOE BUYERS IN TOWN. Aucusta, Ga—11 F Kohler of B F Kohler & Co, Pa Aug us la, Ua—A J Gouley, Craw. Abbeville, S C~P liojenburg of P Rosenburg & Co, Ad. Beaufort, S C—E A Scheper, Pa. Burlington, la—P A Andre. Chicago, Ul—C W Marks. Chicago, 111—J P Smith of R P Smith ,fc Sons, Ad. Cleveland, O—H B Chilas of Childs, Groff Co, Ad. Cleveland, 0—G W Cady of G W Cady & Co, Ad. Clinton. N C—M Hanstein, Pa. Denver, Col—A J Woodslde of A ,T Woodside <te Co, Ad. Denver, Col—II Powell, Pa. Detroit. Mich—L II Lancashire of Mabley & Com pany. Frankfort, Kv—R K McClure. Am. Fernandina, Fla—.1 H Prescott, US. Kalamazoo, Mich—P B Appledorn of P B Appledorn ’8 Sons. Mobile. Ala—A Grotz. Craw. Portsmouth, Va—A Brandt, Pa. Richmond. Mich—J P Cooper of Cooper & Son, Craw. Stiunton. Va—M H Holliday, Craw. St Paul, Minn—H A Coburn of Kellogg, Johnson ¿1 Co, US. St Paul, Minn—G W Freeman of C Gotzlan ,fc Co. Ad, Troy, O—M E liaird of Paker. Baird & Le Fevre. 1 oledo, 0—W J. Roath of Fisher, Eaton & Co, Ad. Winchester. Va—T M Bantz. Craw. Wilmington, O—F B Sayres of Savres ,fc Co, Craw. Brooklyn, .Tuno 18, 1889, ) 786 Lafayette avenue. ( Amonir the questions jnst received is the following from a new correspondent: “You inveigh so strongly against arsenic in face and scalp lotions,” the lady writes, “that I am anxious to know what you think of it ns a medicine in tha hands of a scientific physi- Arsenic is, no doubt, a very valuable reme<ly exceptional cases, as is also htrychnine, and I have no call to criticise the work of a scientific physician’’: but I have seen more mischief result, from the use of arsenic than I could tell if I wrote a week. Does it stand to reason that the us© of such deadly drugs can be salutary ? 1 have a casein mind now, yea, verily, a case right under my eyes and ery dear to my heart, which is certainly a case in point, and will answer my correspond* ent’s question practically; a stubborn cough that rested not by night, or day, the most profuse and alarming expectoration, and a general breaking down of the whole system—certainly condition alarming in every respect. The best physicians had been tried in vain. But Tob had his advisers. “Go and see my doctor,” they said. “lie is a snecialist in pulmonary troubles, and will build you right up.” bo the poor patient drugged himself to the last one recommended, and returned with four prescriptions, one containing arsenic, and ono strychnine, besides various other drug-s, that would kill the strongest animal that ever walked on four legs. The first result was ju^t hat I knew it would be—the inability of the stomach to retain food. This cut off the last hope, for if the poor, weak body could not be nourished, if there could be no slight opposition made to the rapid decay of the tissues, the outlook was certainly not cheering. At last, however, the consumer of these poisons realized his danger aud threw the deadly stuff awav. Now, physicians had utterly failed to benefit this case, and my advice was to stop every kind of medicine, and build up, if possible, on good, nourishing food. Circumstances had made me a daily visitor at one of our finest hospitals for some months, and the contrast between the treatment of the majority of these patients and the patients of piivate physicians was most remarkable. I had seen patients brought from the operating room after most serious work, and in some cases put on a full diet, without a drop of medicine. Murdock's Liquid Food was administered, with common diet, three or four times a day. This is an extract of beef, mutton and fruits, containing blood corpuscles, soluble albumen, and is perfectly free from drugs, minerals, acids and salts. Do not forgot that in the most of these cases no medicine w:is given. It may have been an illogical aud an unjust inference, but I could not help the thought that those hospital patients must be got rid of to make room for others who were waiting, and that, as medicine would retard their recovery, they were given no medicine, but were lust simply and naturally nursed back to aealth. I do. however, sincerely believe that my inference is a correct ouo. Well, as everything else had been tried, aud the patient was about as far on the down grade as it was possible for him to gc without a funeral, I suggested tho hospital treatment. May 20 it was adopted, with results that were little less than magical. In less than two weeks there was a decided change in the condition and appearance of the patient. Every bad symptom was modified. The gain continued, with now and then a slight relapse; of course a system reduced to such extremities could not be expected to rally without an occasional protest ; but that was not discouraging. When the E atient commenced to gain in weight, then I new that common sense was on our side, and common sense had triumphed. Now, 1 knew from my hospital experience and this remarkable experience in my own family, that Murdock’s Liquid Food will build up tissue, enrich the blood and strengthen the muscles md nerves. As I said before, in desperate cases arsenic may be called for, but its use is altogether too common. Men and women take medicine because they are too lazy or too gnorant to take proper food. When the situation becomes alarming, then friends of the patient lose their heads and forget that drugs will not answer for food, and that the nutritive supply must be equal to the demand. The above letter ire received, .ds the parties and letter were unknown to us prior to its receipt we were induced to investigate, and solicited an interview, when we found that the letter had been copied into the leading journals in about every State. We also saw the, patient, who abandoned all medicine from May 20, 1880. LAMKIN & FOSTER, 'Wholesale Ilealem »ml Jobber» of BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS Agents for the Goodyear India Rubber Glove Mfg. Co. of New York. 174, no, 1W, ISO, and 184 C«nffr< Street, Itontun. HATHAWAY, SOULE & HARRINGTON MEN’S F 5 NE SHOES. tlund Ma«l<*, Ouudyrnr Well*, üiachlue Äfwfd. 2SO Devonshire Street. The largest makers of Goodyear Welts in the United States. LKlVOlt LICENSES. BOARD OF POLÍCÉr Î Pemberton Square. B oston , A us. 27. 1889. Notice is hereby given, under Chapter 100 of the Public Statutes, that M. H. COBE & CO. have applied for a transfer of a license to sell intoxicating liquors as wholesale dealers of the fourth class, from No. :',5 Ex change street to 115 Haverhill stm-t. in said Boston, in two roems, first tloor, and cellar of said building. THOMAS RYAN. Clerk. B oston . Aug. 27. 1889. Notice is hereby given, under Chapter 100 of tbe Public Statutes, that M. H. COBE & CO. have applli for a license to sell intoxicating liquors as victuallers of the first class, at No. 115 Haverhill street, In said B ton. in two rooms, first floor, stock in cellar of said building. THOMAS UYAN, Clerk. __ COI»AKTNEUSH11» NOTICES. Certlflcate of oi Lini the Formation itetl Partnership. This is to certify that the undersigned have formed limited partnership pursuant to tne provisions of chapter No. 75 of the Public Statutes of Massachusetts. That the name or firm under whu li such partnership is to be conducted is Horace M. Bicktord. That tbe general nature of the business is buying ana selling lumber and such merchandise as is usually dealt in by dealers in lumber. That the names of the general and special nartners are as follows, to wit: Horace M. Bickford, who re sides at liosion. county of Suffolk, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the general partner, and James H Roberts, who resides at Cambridge, county of Middle sex and State aforesaid, is the special oartner, and ths the said James H. Roberts has contributed the sum of eleven thousand dollars (gll.O'tO) as capital to the common stock, and that said partnership is to com mence on the first day of July, 1889, and to continue to and terminate on the first day of May, 1892. Dated this 22.1 day of July, in ths year of our Lord one thousand »sight hundred and eighty-nine. (Signed) HORACE M. BICKFORD. (Signed) JAMES 11. ROBERTS. S uffolk , ss ., July 22,1S89. Personally appeared before me the said Horace M Bickford and James H. Roberts, each and severally made oath that the foregoing statement, by them sub scribed, is true. (Signed) HOWARD D. NASH. J ustice of the Peace. FOR NEW YORK. STONINGTON LINE SEATS IN CHAIR CARS FREE. Express train leaves Park-Square Station dailv (Sun. days excepted) at 0.:>0 I*. M., arriving at Stonlngton atO.MO I*. M. and New York 6 A. M. next morning. Tickets aud Staterooms secured at 214 Washington, cor. State street, and Park Square Station. J. W. RICHARDSON, Agent, Telephone 2588, i. W. MILLER, O II. BRIGGS. Gten'i Manager. Geo. Pass. Agent. P OCKET KECORD KOOK WITH Wallet—Compact and convenient. Printed and indexed books for the tea trade. For s-Oe by AARON O. WAY A Co., LÏ2 State street. RAILROADS. ___ OLD COLONY. Correete«! to Aiig. 19, 1SSO. Trains leave Boston Station, foot of Summer street week days only, unless otherwise noted, for A »her of i. 0, 7.55 '9.30 am; F12.10, 2.30,4,4.30 6.45, tl.03, (1.20, 159.10, 11.15 p m. Halt imore, *0 pm. ISIril rttreel, 6 ,7, 7.55, 8.35, 0.30, 10, 11 am; 12.15.1.01, 1.35, 2.00, 3.35, 4.3«, 6.10, 5.15, 5.27,5.40,5.46. O.HO, 0.10, 0.20, «1.36. 7.30, K9.10, 10.15, 11.16 p in. Blacktlone, 8.30, 12 m; 3.30, ’0, 7 p in. it an l*n ry, 8 30 am; *6 p ui. Me<thnr>i, 7,11am; 4, 4.35, 5.45, 0.03 pm, l*or<-he*t« r, 0,7.7.55, 8.36, 9.30, 10, 11 a in; 12.15, 1.01, 1.35, 2.30. 3.35, 1 .3«. 5 .l<>. 6.15, 5.27, 5.40. 5.45, 0.00. 0.10, 0 20,6.35.7.30, K9.10, 10.15, 11.15 pm. Oudley Street, 0, 7, 7.55, 8.36, 9.30, 10, 11 a m, 12.15,1.01, 35. 2.30, 3.35. 4. 4.3«, 5.15. 5.27. 6.40, 6.46, 6.10, 0.20,6.35, 7.30, F.9,10, 10.15. 11.15 pm. Ifclli», «, 7.55, 9.30 a in; F12.10, 2.30, 4,3«. 0.03, 0.20, F9.10, 11.15i>m. Emlfrott, «. 7.55, 9.30 a m; F12.10, 2.30,4,4.36, 5.45, 0.03. 6.20, 1.9.10, 11.15 p hi . I'l>h< ki:l-on- H m U mou , 8.30 am; *« pm. Franklin, 7.55.8.30 a m; 12in; 12.10,3.30. 1.35. 5.25. '«, 0 . 20 , 7, 11.16 pin. Forrii Avenue, 7, 8.35,0.30,10.11 am; 12.15. 1.01, t .35, 2.30, 3.35, 4.30. 5.10, 6.40, 6.10.0.20.0.35.7.30, 1.8.lo, 10.15, 11.15pm. BIsirt* f oral, 8.30 a ill ; 12 in; 3,3.30.*« p m. Harvard (“treet, «, 7. 7.55. 8.35, 9.30, 10 11a m; 12.15, 1.01, 1.35, 2.30. 3.35, 4.3«, 5.10, 5.15, 6.27. 6.40, 5.45, 0.06, 0.10, 0 . 20 , 6.35, 7.30, 1 . 9 . 10 . 10.15>, 11.15 p m. Hvile I*nrk, «, 7,7.56.8.35,9.30, lo, 11 am; 12.10. 12.15, I.01,135,2.30,3.35,4. 4.35, 4.30, 5.10. a. 25, 5.40, 6.45, 6.03, 6.06, «.10, 0.20, 0.35, 7.30, K9.10, 10.15, II.15 1 » in. Mli'xhliind Lake, F7.55 a m; F12.10, F6.25. F0.20, 11.16 pm. Inling'ton. «, 7.55, 9.30 a m; F12.10, 2.30, 4.36, 6.03. 6.20, E 9 . 10 . 11.15 p m, ¡Manchester, 8.30 a in, 3,3.30 pm. Muttapun, 6.7.7.65.8.35.9.30. 10, 11 a m: 12.15, 1.01, 1.30, 2.3 J, 3.85, 4, 4.36, 5.10,5.27. 5.40, 5.45. 6 03, 6.06, 6.10.0.20, «.35, 7.30, E9.10, 10.15, 11 15 p III. Milf«>rd( 8.30 a ui; 12 . 10 , 330, 4.35. 5.25 pin; S.,10 pm. .Ul. Ilowilou, 6 , 7, 7.65. 8.35, 9.30,10, 11 am; 12 . 15 . 1 . 01 , 1.35, 2.30, 3.35. 4.36. 5.10. 6.15, 6.27.6.40.6.45, «. 00 , 0 . 10 , «. 20 , 6.36, 7.30, F.9.10, 10.15, 11.16 pm. i%e\v Hritain, 8.30a m, 3. 3.30, *0 p m. Alewbnrit, 8.30 a in. New l.ondou, 7 p m. New Vork, (via Air Line), 8.30 a m; *3, 3.30 p m. Via Hartford, 12 m. Via Norwich Line, 7pm. Norwich, 8.30 a m; 12 m; 3.«0, 7 p m. N urwoiHl, «, 7,55, 9.30 a m; i2.10, 2.30, 4,36, 5,25 6.03.0.20, F.9.10, 1 i. 15 p m. Norwood Central, 6,7.55 8.30,9 30am. 12.10, 2.30. 3.30, 4.35. 4.36, 6.25,6.03, 0.20. F.9.10, 11.15 pill, l'awtncket, 8.15, 8.30 a lit; 12.10, 1, 4.30, 5.25 p m. IMi.ladei* pliia, *6 p m. l*ro\ Idence, 8.15, 8.30 a m; 12.10. 1, 4.30,5.25 pm. Putnam, 8.30 a m; 12 m, 3.30, *«, 7 p. ai. ICeadville. 6 , 7.55, 9.30, 11 a m; 12.10, 2.30, 4, 4.3«. 5.45, 6.03. 6.20. F.9.10, 11.15 pm. K ver Street, 6 , 7, 7.55, 8.35, 9.30, 10, 11 a m; 12.16.1.01.1.35. 2.30, 3.35, 4.3«, 5.10, 5.40, «.0«, 6.10, 6.20, 6.35, 7.30, E9.10. 10.15. 11.15 pm. Uurk- vilie, Conn., 8.30 a m; 3. 3.30 p ill. Moui lihrialtce, 8.30 a m; 3.30 p m. Tilton», 7.55 a m; F12.10, 2.30, F5.25. F0.20, 11.15 pm. %Yalj*ole, 7.55, 8.30, am; 12.10,2.30, 3.30, 4.35. 5.26. 6.20, 11.15 pm. WuKhiitKion, 1 ». C., ’6 p m. tValer»*ury, 8.30 am; 3, *6 pm. Williuiantic, 8.30 a lit; 12 in; *3. 3.30, *6 p m. Wiimlow*, 7.55 a in; 12.10, 2.30, 6.25, 6.20, 11.15 u in. Webster, 8.30 a m; 3.30 p m. Sunnay trains leave Boston for Norwood Central and intermediate station* at 9 a in: 12.45.5.10,10pm. Returning leave Norwood Central at 8.58 a m; 1.68, 6.58 p m. For llvdt* Park and Intermediate st itions, 9 a m; 12.45. 5.10,'7.30, 10 r> m. Return leave Hyde Park 9.21 am; 2.21. 6.21. 9.07 p m. For Franklin and intermediate stations, 9 am; 5.10, Returning have Franklin 8.26a. in: 5.2« p.m. W OON SUC K. ICT HI VISION. Leave depot of Boston & Albany railroad, Boston, daily, Sundays excepted, as follows; For Needham siKl WayKlaiiuia, 7, 8 , 10.45 a in; 12.16,2.35, 3.25. 4.45,'5.20, 5.56 6.16, 7.15, '¡10.15 p m; S12.45, 85 oOp in. ISetorn, 6.55,6.45.7.31,8, 9.50.11.38 a in; 1.4ft, 3.40, 4.60, 6.05, «.4«, 10.05 p m; S9.10 a m; SI.45, 85.45 p tn. iVoonnocUet, 8 a in; 12.15, 3.25, 6.20 pm; .s5.30pm. Keturii, 6 25, 8.30 a m; 12.40, 3.40,5.40 pm; S 8 am; stopping at intermediate stations. S Sundays. * Dallv and Sundays, f Wednesdays and Fridays ;it 11.10 lnsteatl of 10.15. F Stops on notice. K On Saturday 9.20 instead of 9.10. W A. >». HAY EXPRESS TRAIW O• O* *—For New York (via Middletown and New Haven). A part of ttiis train runs through to Hartford. New Britnln, V.’uterbury, Daubury, Fishkill-on-Hudson, Newburgh and Turners, N. Y., there connecting with Fne Railway for I*oint* t%'« »t via Buffalo, Niagara Falls * Grand Trunk Railway. I »> aa iti 11 ) i) a v i XPREM-ror I «»IFU New York via Hartford, Parlor cars and coaches run through, i »tiling c.ir Boston to Hartford. Arrives New York 6.30 p. m. \\ »-ek days only, •» I W1 **• H. NEW EN OI..AN 1» I.Ltl- ITKII -Dailv. including Sundays—For New York (via Air Line Route) running 8 « miles without a stop. Due Grand Central Depot, New York, at 9 p. m. Connects at Willimuntic oil week days with train for Hartford. N < w Bntain and Waterbury. _ A dining car rnns on tiiis train between Boston and Willimantic. /i AA 5*. M. WASHINGTON EX- i*RKSS—Daily, luclndtng Sundays—For Hartford. New Britain. Waterbury, Danbury, Fisbkill- on-Hudson. Jersey CUy, Trenton, Philadelphia, Baltimore and W.-ulii ;gton, connecting tor Iticlimond and oints South. Through Pullman buffet cars to Wasli- gton. 7 Ai» **• w NORWICH MNE KX- 1 ,‘Mf PR1CSH— For New York, New London Norwich, Dantelsonvllle and Putnam. Train connects at New Lonoon with STFAMF.R CITY OF NEW YORK or CITY OF W0RCESTER. eats In l arlor Car», Berths in Pullman Cars. State rooms on steamers. Tickets and information obtained at Oth< e. 322 Washington street, or at liepot, foot of unimer street, Boston. A. A. JACKSON. F. P. VISING. A. C. KENDALL. Gen’l Sup’t.Trafflc Manager. Gen, I’ass. Agt. TRAIN SERVICE FROM BOSTON SPECIAL NOTICE—Passenger» holding ticket* via this road, tbe FALL R1VLR LINE, SHORE LINE, PROVIDENCE LINK and STONINGTON LINE,may have baggage checked from HOTEf.or RESIDENCE. In BOSTON to DESTINATION. Orders to call for baggage may be left at No. 3 Old State House. T ik K'T ablrs showing local and through train service between all stations may b« obtained at all tlckeJ offices of this company. CENTRAL DIVISION. Leave KN KKLAM) STREET Station for NEW YOK 1 C, \U, 7 p.m. week <!») •. Via I’Jill River Line, I ? p. m. Sunday». II ROCK TON. 8.45. 8.15, 9, 10.05 ¡um.; 12 m.; 1. 2.15, 3 30 4.05,4.15. 4 . 35 , 5.20, 6 07,8.15. 11.10 p.m. Sundays. 4.30, 7.30, S.15 a.m.; 6.30, 5.45 p.m. aFAi.L RIVER (via Taunton), 5.45, S.30, 11.40 a.m.; 2.15, 3.40, 4.35. 6 . 7 p.m.; (via Brockton), 8.15 a.m.j 12 m.; 4 35 p.m. Sundays (via Brockton), 4.30 a.m.; 5.30,5.45ri.m.; (via Taunton), 4.30 a.m.: 7 p.m. NANTASKEr, 5.45. 7.36. S.35. J 1.20 a.m; 2.35, 3.50, 6 , 5.20, «.12 p.m. Sundays. 9.15 a.m.; 1.30.5 p.m. a N FW BEDFORD, 6.45 a.m.; 7 (ex.) p.m. Sundays, 7 p.m. «NEWPORT, 5.45, S.30. 11.40 a.m.; 3.40, 4.35. 6 <i, 7 n.in. Sundays. 4.30 a.m.; d’t p.m. PLYMOUTH (via Ablngton). 8.15 a.m.; 2.30. 3.40, 6.30 p.m.; (via Duxbury), 7.35, 11.20 a.m.; 3.50 p.m. Sundays, 9.30 a.m. via Duxbury. aTAl’NTON (Central Station), 5.45, 8.30, 11.40 i.m.; 2.15, 4 35. 7 p.m.; (Dean St.), 3.40 p.m. Sundays. 4.30 a.m.; 7 p.m. «Additional trains. See Prov. Div. </Boat from Fall River. R A 1 liBOA OS. CAPE COD DIVISION. and Way Stations, 9 a.m. 4.11 PR0V1NCET0WN p.m. H Y ANNIS.9 a.tn.; 1, 3.30, 4.15 p. m. (v.eek dsj«); 8.15 a. in. (Sundays). FA I «HAVEN Branch Sta'lons, 9 a.m.; 4.05 p.m.. WOODS HOLL Branch Stations, 9 a.m.; 1, 4.05 p.m- (week days); 8.16 a.m. (Sund ys . CHAlllA.M Branch statiors, 9a.m.; 4.15 p.m. (week days); 1 p. m. (Saturdays); 8.15a. tn. (Sundays). >1 AIM HA S VINEYARD, i) a.m.; 1, 4.15 p.m. tweek days); 8.15 a.m. (Sundays). NANTUCKET, 1 p.m. tweek days); 8.15 a.ir. (Sundays!. PROVIDENCE DIVISION. Leave PARK SQUARE Station for NEW™ I1SH0RE LINE 'ID A.M. 1 P.M. PROBATE NOTICES. C 10HM0NWKAI.TH OF MASS \ CHI ) SETTS.—SUFFOLK. ss.-PROBATE COURT, lo the heira-at-law, next of kin and all other persons Interested In the estate of JOHN H. EVERETT, late of Boston, in said county, deceased, and to Willia^i Putnam Kuhn, named as one of the executors in the instruments hereinafter mentioned, Greeting: Whereas, certain instruments purporting to be the last will and testament and five '-odicils of said deceased have been presented to said court, for pro bate, by OTIS I'.. WELD of said Boston, who prays that letters testamentary maybe issued to him and WILLIAM PUTNAM KUHN,'the executors therein named, without giving a surety or sureties on their official bonds: Yon are hereby cited to appear at a l’rob ite Court to be held at Boston, m said county of Suffolk, on Monday, the ninth day of September, A. 1>. 1S89, at tun o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause, U any you have, against the, same. And said petitioners are hereby directed to give public notice thereof by publishing this citation once a week, for three successive weeks, in the newspaper called the Boston l’ost, printed at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least, before said court. Witness, ,l ^> iin W. M c K jm , Esquire, Judge of said court, this nineteenth day of August, in the year one thousand eight huudred and eighty-nine. ELIJAH GEORGE, Register. C iOMMONWIKAIaTII OI / SETTS.—SUFFOLK, ss.-PROBATE COURT. To all persons interested in the estate of NATHANIEL PHILLIPS 1.0VERING, late of Boston, m said county, deceased. Greeting; Whereas, WARREN K. BLODGETT, executor of the will of said deceased, has presented tor allowance the first account of his administration upon the estate of said deceased: Vou are hereby cited to appear at a Probate Court to be holden at lioston. In said county of Suffolk, on the second day of September. A. D. 1389, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause, tf any yon have, why the 8.11116 should not be allowed. And said executor is ordered to serve this citation by publishing the same once a w^ek, for three successive weeks, in the Boston Post, a newspaper printed at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least, before said court. Witness, J ohn W. M c K im , Esquire, Judgo of said court, this twelfth day of August, in the year one thousand eight huudred and eighty-nine. ELIJAH GEORGE, Register. C WMMONWBAI/ni OK MASSAC1IV- j SETTS.—SUFFOLK. ss.-PROBATE COURT. To the heus-at-law and others interested in the estate of CLEMENTINA B. -MINOT, late of Boston, in paid county, deceased, Greeting Whereas, ROBERT S. MINOT, administrator, with the will annexed, of the estate not already administered of said deceased, has presented to said court his petition for license to sell the whole of tho real estate of said deceased for the payment of legacies and charges of administration anu for other reasons set forth in s <:d petition: You are hereby cited to apoear at a Probate Court to be holden at Boston, in said county of Suffolk, on Monday, the sixteenth day of Septem ber, A. D. 1889, at ten o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause. If any you have, against the same; and said administrator is ordered to serve this citation by publish ing the same once a week, for thre« successive weeks, in the Boston Post, a newspaper printed at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least, before said court. Witness, J ohn * W. M c K im , Esquire, Judge of said court, this twenty-sixth day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eightv-nine. ELIJAH GEORGE, Register. ( 'lOMMOXWEAI/FH OK MAMSACHU- J SETTS.—SUFFOLK, ss.-PROBATE COURT. To all persons interested In the estate of HENRY K IIORTON, late ot Boston, In said county, deceased, Greeting: \Vhereas, ROBERT D. WESTON-SMITH, administrator of the estate of saia deceased, has presented f allowance the llrst and final account of his administration upon tbe estate of said deceased: You are hereby cited to appear at. a Probate Court to be liohien at Boston, in said county of Suffolk, on Monday, the sixteenth day of September, A. D. 1889, a ten o’clock in the forenoon, to show cause, if auv you. have, why the same should not be allowed. And said administrator is ordered to serve this citation by pub lishing the same once a week, for three successive weeks, in the Boston Post, a newspaper printed at said Boston, the last publication to be two days, at least oefore said court. Witness, John w, M c K im . Esquire. Judge of said court, t,hi 9 twenty-fifth day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine. JOHN 11, PAINE, Assistant Register. FITCHBURG, CHESHIRE AND CENTRAL VERMONT RAILROADS RUTLAND ROUTE FOB Montreal, Ottawa and Ogdensburg. B.fiO il. in. No. il. ¡ 1.00 p. :>< No. S. Ï.OH p. r No. 1 >. BOSTON & MAINE. City Tick**« Ofllro, *1* W*«hln*toB Street, it,I DoAr from Slate St. Time Table« »howlnu local or throw or* triiln »rrvici* can *»«• obtained at any ticket oflice off tho company, or will be • rut to auy ti«l<lre«a «» receipt ot po*t«g card. « 9 DIVE 30, 1 SSO. THROUGH TRAIN SEBVICV Western and Eastern Division*. Autumu, Ilaymarket *<j. Station. 8 . 8 .JO a in; 1 P na. Causeway st. Station, t) a m; 12.JO, 7 p ni. Italic«,r ml Hur lliirlior, Ilaymarket sq. Sw tion. 8 , 8.30 a m. Causeway >U Station, 0 a in; 7 p tn. Conrnnl, If., »«ml Slatbini ,,n RouiIf, Havmarket 8 q. Station, , .30 a in; 12.30,3,6 pm. _ . Oli*n Station, Crawford’» »inti Fal*y»n *, causeway si. Station, 8.30 am: 1.30 pm. I.ewintoa, llrt.vnii'iket S(i. Station, S.30 am, 1 pm. Causeway St. Station. Da m; 12.30. 7 p >n. IMitochexter. IV. 18., ilaymarket Sq. Station, 7.30 a m; 12.30, 3. 5 p tn. St. .John, Halifax anil the Province», Hav. market Sq. station. 8 a in. Provincial Express. Causeway St. Station, il a in: 7 p m. Stntlon* «*n Maine Central, Wrtui'l Trunk ond Ii.nox anil I„lneoIn 1C. Its. ilaymarket Sq. Station. 8.30 a in. Causeway St. Station, 0 a in. KAIL AN O NTEAMKK LIXES. fitorkla.'itl, Caatine, Oeer l«le, Seilsewict, Saudi Went Harbor. IBur Iliirbor, Mil! It rid «e, .Machiaaport, (ateainer from Portland Tuesdays and Fridays), Causeway St. Station, 7 p in. 12a*tpor(, Calai«, St. «John. 3*. II-, (steamer from Portland Mondays. Wedne«day* and Fridays), Causeway St. statton, 12.30 pm. Lowell System. Station on Cauienuy Street, Foot of Port* laml Street. Alanclieater ami Concord, IV. II., 7.30, 8.30, 0, U.30 a in; 12 m, 12 45. 1, 3, 5, 5.30, 7 p ra. Franklin, Lelinuou, noil iVhite Jtiver »1 unction, 8.30 a m; 1, 3, 7 p m. Itriato! iSranein, 8.30 a in, 1 p ni. Claremont Itvaneli, 8.30a m; 1 p m. St. tlohnnburj', Xewport, Sherbrooke, Qne- l»ec, 9 a m; 7 p m. IVorwicIi and Hanover, Ttietfford, Brad" foril uni* Kewbury, ci.SOam; 1, 7 pm. ?>loutpeiier, C>»ex »luiict., Hurlinictou and AS on treat, via White River Juuct., 8.30 a ni; 1, 7 p m. Montreal, via Montreal ,t Boston Air Line, 9 am; J bill. 7 p m train runs daily over both lines to .Montreal. Points ou li.. C. <fc M. R. R„ 9, 0.30 a ra; 12.45, 7 pm. 5 P.M, l»AY EXPRESS. Drawing lloom Cars | AFTERNOON EXPRESS. ( Ruffe' Drawing Room Cars. ( LIMITED EXPRESS. ) Buffet Drawing Room Car«. I NIGHT EXPRESS MAIL. n On D L I-a?*t train of the day. itiU Iii/lif Sleeping ears; open for ) occupation at 9.1B p.m. Through tickets, drawing-room car seats and sleeping xt li» rihs may be obtained at No. 3 Old State House, 21-1 VVaoiungtori street and at station. NEIV YOliK, 6.30 pm., Via Providence and Sionington Line». IJKDHAM (via West Uoxbury). 7.05.8.05,9, 10.05. 10.40 11.35 a.m.: 12.30. 1.15, 2.25, 3.15, 3.45, 4.30, 4.50, 5.25. 6 , 6.15,7, 7.35,0.15,10.30,11.15 u.m. Sundays, 10.30, 12.30, 2.45, 5.30. 7.30.10 p.m. (Via Readville). G.45, 7.30. 0.35, a.m.: 12.10, 2.40, 4.45, 6.05, 5.20. 5.50, «.35. 8 . 0. 10.15. 11.32 p.m. Sundays, 8.3'> a.in.: 12.45, 5.15 p.m. 6PAL1, 1UVER, 7.45. 9.30 a.m.; 2,5.30 p.m. Sundays. 4.15 a.m. HYDE PARK. 6.30. 6.45, 7.30, 7.45, 8.30, 9.35. 10.30, 10.50. 11.40 a.m.; 12.05, 12.10, 1.20, 2.10.2.40.3.30.4.4.02.4.15, 4.45, 5.05,5.20,5.30, 5.50.5.55,6.05,6.25,6.35,8,9,0.30. 10.15, 11,05, 11.32 p.m. Sundays, 4.15, 8.30, 0 a.m.; 12.45,4 30, 515. 8.15 P.m. bS EWPORT (via Fall River), 7.45, 0.30 a.m.; 2 71 .n 1 . Sundays, 4.15 a.m. NEWPORT (via Wickford Junction), lO a.m.; 1, 3, 11.30p.m. JXEW BEDFORD. 7.45, 8.30 a.m.; 12 m.; 2, 5.10 p.m. Sundays, 4.15 a.m. PAWTUCKET, 7. 7.45, 8.30. 9.30, 10.39 a.m.: 12 m.; 1. 2, 3. 4, 4 15, 5.30, 9.30, 11.30 p.m. Sunday», 4.15, 9 a.m.; 4.30,1.1.30 p. m. 1 Seventeen trains Week PROVIDENCE! I five trains Sundays. 7 . 45 . H.:SO. Id, 10.:*0 a.m.; 18 », 37 4 , t,i.i, 5, r,.:io. «.30, li.ltO p.m. Sundays, 4.15, 5* a.ui.i 11.31) p.m. KF.ADV1IJ.E, 6.30, 6.45. 7.30, 7.45, 8 30,9.35, 10.30, 10.50, 11.40 a.m.; 12.05. 12.10. 1.20, 2.10, 2 40 3.30, 4, 4.02. 4.45. 5.05, ¿.20, 5.50. 5..>o, 6.05, a25. 6.35, 8,0, 10.15. lt.32 p.m. Sundays, 8.30. 0 a-m.; 12.45. 5.15. 8.15 p.m. ¿TAUNTON. 7.45. 8.30, 0.30, lO.oO a.m.; 12 in., -, 6.10, 5.30. 11.05 p.m. Sundays, 4.15 a.m. WRENTHAM, 8.30 a.m.; 5.30 p.m. ftt'or additional trains, see Central Dlv. NORTHERN DIVISION. Leave Boston & Albany Station, Kneeland Street, for .M ARLBORO. 7.15, 10.55 a.m.; 2.15, 4.30, 5.25, 6.25, rll p.m. Sundavs, 6 p.m. FITCHBURG and LEOMINSTER, 7.15,10.55 a.m.; 2.15, 4.30. 5.25. rll p.m. Sundays, 6 p.m. (■Wednesdays and Saturdays only. <;EO. L. CONNOR. <ieu. Pass’r Agent, J, R. KENDRICK, Geu. Manager. Aug. 22. 1889. 7 , ».»O, 4.30 FITCHBURG RAILROAD. HOOSAC TUNNEL ROUTE Trains leave Fitchburg Depot. Causeway street, Boston, AT 8.00 A. M. .ffiSTSS® Mli.ms) for Winehendon. Jattrey, Peterboro, FitiwU- liam, Trov, Marlboro, Keene, Westmoreland. Walpole, Bellows Falls, Rutland, Burlington, St.. Albans, St. Johns, Montreal and Ogdensburg, connecting at Rutland tor Saratoga aud ail l*oluts ou iieiaware ^ Hudson Canal Company R. K. V rsi ¡a \ 1 \| for stations A ll.OVl Jl» the Cheshire, Connecticut Liver and Central Vermont to White River Junction, where connection is made tor all stations north via Central Vermont Line. V nn 1 > , v «- y ) x u for stations on Ches- 1 O.v*) J- • 11 * lare & Monadnock and Rutland it. lt.’s to Rutland, also to White River J unction. AT 7.oo P. M. i - ki S» S except Sundav). with Waitner l*aluee Sleepln« i’sir tor te.«itla»<i. BurllnKton.and St. Albans, making close eunnection with trains for MontreiU, urriving at ».35 A. .1*., Ottawa at 11:40 A. *a., and Ouilensliiirs at 11:30 A. M. Tickets and berths secured at LINE OFFICE, 223 Washiiigton street, Boston. C. A. FAXON, Gen. Agt. li. STEWART, tieru Manager, Keeue. li. H. July 11, 138S. BOSTON & ALBiVNY R, R, May 1», ISfi!». Time tables showing local and through train servlca between all stations may be obtained at all ticket odices of thii company. Trains for Alliauy and the West leave ISo«tou as toliows: fDaily except Sunday, Drawing Room I Car to Albany. Through connec- “1 tions for i»yi-aeuwe, Et»Chester, (.Bufi'aio and all points We*t. /'Dailv, Elegant Vestiluiled Wagner Cars I for Maeara Kails, lietrolt an i j Chicago via HIichi|fan C'euti-al I if. U.i also for Clevvlaiul, To] led« and <'liieaK» via Lake Nliure .V, Micliiiiau ¡Southern I it. IS.; also for St. iLoiii* daily, and l.to Cincinnati daily, except Sunday. ("Dally. Elegant Vestibuled Wagner Car* , ] for Niagara Kails, Ki trmt and ] nileajc»; also for Clevetaml, ^Toledo and ('liicaso. 10.30 p. m. Sleeping Car to Albany. Daily, except Saturday. For Hartford, New Haven and New York. 0.00 a. in. With elegant Buffet Drawing Room Cars. 11.«0 a. 111 . With elegant Drawing Roona Cars. Dining Car Worcester to Slew Haven. 4.00 p. in. ltaily. Limited Express. Elegant Drawing Room Cars. Electric lighted. Dming Car Worcester to New Haven. 11.00 p. in. l»aily, With elegant new Sleeping Cars. For tickets, sleeping or parlor car accommodations apply at city oflice, 232 Washington street, or at *t&, tion Kneeiand street, Boston. A. 8. HANSON, Gan. Pass, Agu On and after «lime 17, 1889, TRAINS LEAVE BOSTON PASSENGER STATION’, CAUSEWAY STREET. FOR THE WEST. <>/\ A M. ACCOMMODATION for Troy and Albany. ^ O oa A M. EXPRESS, PARLOR CAR for Troy. 0»0" Albauy and Binghamton. Sleeping Car for millalo. A M ACCOMMOn VTION for Troy aud I JL»»>'* Albanv. O Ail r M. DAILY EXPRESS, with Sleeping OiV* I Cars to Chicago via Niagara Falls Short line aud via Erie & Doston Line; also to St. Louis via Michigan Central and Wabash railways. 7 nn p M, DAILY EXPRESS, with Sleeping „IM " Cars to Chicago via Niagara Falls and Chicago A Grand Trunk Railway. II AA PM, NIGUT EXPRESS. Sleeping Cars Il.UU to 'lroy. Ayer Junction—6,30,8, 8.30, 0, alO.45, 11.30 k m; 2.20, *3,3.05, 4.40, 6 , Ü.23, *7, 11pm. aun- 4ay, ft a in. 1.05, 3. 7 p in. liclmou 1 anil Waverley-6.30, 6.55. 9, 10, 11.10am; 12.30,2.05.2.20, 3.15. *4.5. *6.30. 6.03, 23 7.30. 9. 10,11.20 p in. Sunday, 9, 11 a 111 ; l.Oo, IIrattU*"boi-o (via Miller’s Falls)— 8.30,11.30 am; C'nmlu'ilive —6 05. 6.30, 6.55, 7.10. S.05. 8.J5, 9, 10.10,30.11.10am; 12.05, 12.30. 13 0, 2.0o, 2.‘.0, S.12, 3.15. *4. 4.40. 5, 5.10, 5.33, 5.40. 6.03. 6.13. 0.^6, G.40. 7.15, 7.30, 8.30, 9, 10, 10.15, 11.20, 11.30 p la. Sunday, S.60. 9, 11 a m; 12.45,1.06, 2. 4, 4,5o, 1.15. 7.05, 9.30. 10.10 p 111 . Cheshire K. «.— 8 , 11.30 a m; 3.05, 7 pm. Concord—6.30. 8 , 9. 11,10. 11.30 « m; 2.20.3.05. 4, 4.40, 5.30, 5.3i, 6 , 6.23, 7.30, 11 pm. Sunday, 9 a m: 1.06, 3, 5.30, 7 p m. _ .. Kitcliburic—0.30, 8 , 8.30, 9, <il0.45, 11.80 am; 2.20. *3, 3.05, 4.40,6, *7, 11 P m. Sunday, 9 a m; 1.05. 3, 7 p m. . ___ Murdner and ^Iiller?» I alls—6.30, 8 . 0 O, lalO.45, 11.30 a m; *^3, 3.05, ^4.40, *7 p m. ri*entlel<l—6.30, 8.30, al0.45, 11.30 am; *3, 3.05. *7. 11 P m. lloosieU 1 'alU ana Johnionville. S. * 6.30, 8.30, al0.45. 11.30 am; *3. 3.05.*7, 11 p m. I incoln—6.30,9, 11,10 a m; 2,20. 4, 4.4Ö. *5.30. 6.31?, 6.23, 7.30, 11 p 111 . Sunday, 9 am; 1.05, 6.S0 p tn. Marlboro, Hudson and Maynard— 8 , 11.30 » m; 3.05, 6.30, 6 . $11 P m. Sunday, 9 am; 7 p m. ¡\iithua, X. II., via Ayer Junction—6.30, 8 , 11,80 am: 3.05, 4.40. 6 p in. Nortb Adams aud Williainotown—6,30,8.30, al0.45. 11.30 a m; *3. 3.05, *7. 11 p m. Ä ui tli l^eominster—6.30, 8 , 9. 11.30 a m; 3.05, 4.40, 6 , It p m. Sunday, 9 a in; 1.05, 7 p in. 8airmt»t;a—8.30, alO.45, 11.30 am. Shelburne Kails—6,30, 8.30, al0.45, 11.30 a m; *3. 3.05, *7 p m. Union Stiuare and Hosnerville—6.05, 6.30. 6.55,7.10,8.05,8.35,9,10,10.30 p m; 12.05, 12.30. 1.30, 2.05. 3.15, *4, 5, 5.83. 5.40. 6.03, 6.13, 6.26, 6.40, 7.15. 7.30. 8.30, 9, 10. 10.15, 11.20 p m. Sunday. 8.50, 9. 11 a m; 12.45. 2. 4 . 4.55. 6.15. 7.05, 9.30,10.15 p in. TltililMiin—6.05. 6.30, 6.55, 7.10, 8 , 8.35 9.10, LOCAL TRAIN SERVICE. WESTERN DIVISION. Trains Leave Boston Miatiou, Ilaymarket Square, for Portland, 7.30, 8 Provincial Express, 8.80 a tn; 1,4 pm. Alliin Hay, ICoelicster and Farm* ■ nvton. 8.30 a in; I, 4 p tn. Andover, 6,7.30 9.30,10.26 am; 12 in; 12.30, 2.15. 2.30,3.20,4.02. 5, 0, 6.35, 7, 11 p 111 . Oover. 7.30, S.30 a m; 12, 1, 4, 0 p m. INortli Conway, 8.30 a m; 1 pm. 1C xc ter, 7.30, 8 , 8.30 a 111 ; 12 111 ; 1,4,6 p ni. Great Falls, 7.30. 8.30 a 111 ; 1 , 4, 6 p m. Uavt-i-hill, a 7.30, 8 . 8.33, 9.30 a in ; 12 in; 1, 2.15,3, 3.20, 4, 5. 0, 7, 11 p 111 ; via Georgetown 7.15 a m; 12.15, 3.02, 4.45, 6.15 p m. Kennebunk, H 1)1 lit'lord and Naco, 7.30. 8.30 a m; 1, 4 pm. Lawrence, 6 . 7.30, 8.30. P.30, 10.25 a mi 12 m; 12.30, 1. 2.15, 3. 3.20. 4, 4.02, 5. 6 , b.36, 7. 11 p 111 . Lowell, 7.30, 9.30, Í0.25 a m; 12 111 ; 2.15t 2.30, 3.20, 4.30. 6 , 6 , 6.35. tip m. Biewburyport, 7.15 am; 12.15,3.02. 4.45, 6.15 p rn. ICeadioe, 6.7.7.30.8.05.8.40.9.30, 10.25 a m; 12 m; 1.80, 2.15, 2.30. 3.20, 4.02, 4.30, 5.01, 5.15, 6 , 6.01, 6.05, 6.35, »¿'6.36. 7. 7.20,8, 9,15. 10.15, 11. 11.16 pm. Stw.leiu, 7.40, 11.30 a m; 3.22, 4.15, 5.45 p. nu SDXIIAY TRAINS. Hover, 6 pm. Haverb 11 , 8 am; 6,7.30 pm. Lawrence, 8 a m; 6 , 6 , 7.30 p m. Manchester, 8 a 111 ; 6 p m. Lowell, 8 a m; 6 , 7.30 p m. Medí 011 I, 8.45 a m; 12.45, 2.50, 5.30, 7.40, 9.45 pm. Ki-adinz and Wav Stations, 8 , 10 am; 12.30,1.45, 2.45. 4, 5, 6.10, 7, 7.30, 8.10, 9.15, , 10.16 p m. w Workingmen's train. EASTERN DIVISION. Trains Leave lioston Station, Causeway street, for Portland, 7.30, 9 a 111 ; 12.30,7 pm. Amesbury, 6.05, 7.30. {♦. 10 a m; 12.30. 3.20, 4.40, 7 p m. llev* erlv, 6.05, 7.30.8.10.10.10.45,11.10am; 12.30,1.40* 2.15, 3.20. 3.30, 4.40, 5. 5.15. 6 , 6.20, 6.40, 7.10 9.20 l>m. lTtiddeforit,7.30, 9 a m; 12.30, 7 p m. «¿real Palls and Itochewter, 7.80, 9.30 y 11 ; 1.30, 3.2<J pm. llani|,t»u (lleaeh), and Älorth Sl.unpton (Rye Reach), 7.30, 9.30,10 am; 12.30, 1.30, 3.15, 3 20, 4.40, 7 p m. Ipswicli, 6.05, 7.00, 9.30, 10 a m] 12.30, 1.40, 3.20, 4.40, 6 . 6.40 p m. L.viin, 6.05, «6.15. 6.30. 7.10. <r7.15, 7.30. a», 8.10.8.30.6.50,9, (»9.15, 9.30.9.40,10, «10.15,10.45,10.55,11.10, all.50 a ni; 12 111 ; 12.30, «1, 1.30, 1.40, «2,2.30,2.36,3, 3.20.3.30, o3.35, 3.45, 4, 4.25, 4.40. <d.50. ft, 5.05, 5.15, f.5.20. 5.3.1. a 5.50, 6 . <»6.03. 6.10, <76.15.6.20, <«<’6.35,6.40, 7.10, 7.15. c/7.20. 7.50, .t8.40. 9,9.20, alO, lu.16, 11.15, all.20 pm. Marblehead and. Nwauuiscott Ifcrancn, 6.30,8.30. 9.40, 10.56 am; 12.30, 2.30, 4. 5.05,6, 7.50 pm. JVewburvpurt, 6.05. 7.30, 9. 9.30. 10 am; 12.30, 1.30, 1.40,3.15, 3.20, 4.40. 6 , 6.40 7 pin. Aiurtli Comvay, 7.S0, 9.30am; 1.30 pm. Portsmouth, 7.30,9,9.30. id a in; 12.30, 1.30, 3.15, 3 . 20 . 4.40. 7 p m. iCm-Utioii and Gloucester Utrancli, 6.05. 8.10, 10.45 am; 2.15, 3-:tO, 5. 6.20, 7.10, 9.20 pm. S:dem, 6.05. 7.10. 7.30. 17.40, 08 . 8.50. 9. 9.30 10,10.45,11.10, 11.30 am; 12 m; 12 . 30 , 1.30, 1.40. 2.15, 3,3.20, •53.22. 3.30, 4. 4.40, 5, 5.15. 5.35, H5.45, €, 6.20, 6.40, 7.10. 7.50, 9, 9.20. 1U.15. 11.15 p m. station» o;i VorU Harbor A Beach S£. JK., 9.30 a m; 1.30, 3.15, 4. 40 p m. swani|t>c’iilt, 6.05.6.30.7.10, <»S, 8.30, 9 .4 0 . 10, 10.65.11.10 am; 12 m; 1.40, 2.30, 3,4,5.06,6.85, 6.20, 7.50, 9. 9.2P, 10.15 11.15 p m. Wolle boro, 7.3o. 9.30 a ms 1.30, 3.20 p m. SITMIAV TRAINS. Lvnn and Way Stations. <j7.55. 8.20. 9.20, «9 40, 10. 10.20, 11. 11,55 am; 12.45, 1.15. al.25, 1.45, 2.15, 2.45. 3.15, 3.45. 4.15, 4.45, «4 50.5.15, 6.45.6.20.6.45, 7.15. «7.20, 7 50, 8.45,9.30, a9.S5, «10.30 pin. Aiewliuryi»ort anil Portsmouth, 8.20 a in; 7 p m. I’ortland, Ilaiiffor, Si. John aud Halifax, 7 pm. Salem. 8.20,9.20,10.11 a 111 ; 1.15. 3.15, 5.15, 5.45, 6.20, 7, 7-15. 9.30, al0.30 0 m. a Via Saugus Branch. toWorkingmen 8 train. H Via South Heading Brauch, station in Boston, Ilaymarket square. PROVIDENCE LINE jSTEW YORK. FAS l' EXPRESS TRAIX leaves Park square station U. (’. It. R. at U.;tO p. m. (with Parlor ears) direct to wharf at Providence of elegant steamers Siao* sachu«ettn and Connecticut. Reeves’s renowned orchestra on each ftleanier, Tick* etsS, state room. etc.. etc., can be o.btainea ¡it ticket office, Park siuarestation, and 214 Washineton street, J. \V. HicUAKiihON.atient, Boston. Telephone No. 2688, J. W. MI1.LER. O. H. BRIGGS, -- Ueu’l Manager. Cieu’l l’ass. Agtau 4.55, 5.30, 6.15, 7.05, 9.30. 10 15 p m. Watertown, I nion Market und Mt.Au» burn—6.05. 7.05. 7.10. 8.35, 10.30 a m; 1^05, 1.30, 3.12.4.15,5.10. 5.49. 6.10, 6.40. 7.15, 8.30^ 10.15, 11.30 d » 1 ». Sunday« 8.50 a in; 12.45, 2, 4..5a, 6.15. 1 %v»r,M*ster, via Ayer Junction—6.30, 11.30 a m; 3.05,4.40 p m. Sunday. 1.05 u m. •Daily, Sundays Included. Sunday, Sundays only. ^Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 1 Does not stop at Miller’s b alls. a Week -Viivs only from .Inly 15 to Sept. 7 inclusive. Local time tables can be obtained at ticket offices at station, and at Hoosac Tunnel route office, 250 Washington street, Boston, where through tickets to all points West are on sale. JOHN ADAMS, J. WHITMORE, Gen’l. Sunt. Gen’U Traffic Manager. J. R. WATSON. Gen'l, I’aas. Agent. LOWELL SYSTEM. Trains Leave Itostoa Station, Causeway Street, for Keene. Peterboro, Hillsboro, 8.30 a m; 3 t> rn. Hillsboro, via Concord. 1 p in. Wilton, Millord and Amherst. 8.30 am; 12 m; 3 and 6 p in, «»reentleld, 8.30 a m; 3 pm. Nashua, 7.30.8^50, 9, 9.30 a in; 12 m; 12.45,1,3,5,5.30,7 pm. l^owell, *6.45, 7.30, 8 . 8 . 3 ( 1 , 8 . 35 , 9 , 9.30, *10. 11 a m; 12 m; 12.45, 1,2, 3, *3.45, 4.45.5, 5.30, *5.45, 6,15, 7, 10, 11.10pm. North Iftillerica. 6.45, 7.30, 8.35, 1U a in; 12 m; 2, 3.45, 5.30, 5.45, 10, 11.10 p m; law. cence, 8 . 11 a tn; 1.10, 4, 4.45, 5.35, 6.15 p m. Siou<*Ciani, 6.55. 8.10, 9.05. 10.15, 11.30 a m; 12.10, 1.40, 2.30. 3.30, 4.30, 5.05, 5.40, 6.20, 7.15,11.15 pm. Wubnru, 6.55.7.32,8,8.36,9.35, 11 a m; 12.10, 1.10. 2, 3.10, 4, 4.45, 5.35, 5.50, 6.15, 6.40, 7.30. 9. 10, 11.10 p m. Winchester, 6.56. 7.30,7.32,8.8.10,8.35, 9.05. 9.35, 10.15, 11, 11.30 am; 12m: 12.10, 1.10. 1.40, 2. 2.30. 3.10. 3.30.4. 4.30, 4.45, 5.05, 5.35, 5.40, 5.50, 6.15, 6.40, 7.15, 7.30, 9.10, 11.15 p ill. Concord, Mass., sknil Ke- I'orniatory Station, 7.50 a m; 1.35,4.25 pm. »Via BeaforcL SUNDAY TRAINS, Nashua, 1 and 7 p m. S.»well, 9 am; 1, 6 , 7 p m. Htouetinni and Way Stations, 10 nM; 1.30.5.30, 7.15. 10 p ni. 'Woburn and Way Stations, 9 a m; 1.05. 4, 5, 7.45, 10.i5 p m. Mauehea* ter aud Coucoril, 1,7 pm. .Montreal, 7 pm. Central Massachusetts Division. Trains I^eave Huston Station, Cauneway Sti'eet, Foot of Portland Street, tor Northampton, Hadley, Amherst, Eleleiier- towu, Itondsv ill»*. Ware, Oilbertville, Barre, ltutland, Oakdale. West Hoyiston and Worcester, 7.45 a m; 1.30, 3.4CI pci So. Clinton and Iterliii, 7.45 a in; 1.30,3.40 pm. Hudson, So. Sudbury, 7.45, 9.20 a m; 1.30,3.40, 5.25, 6.25 p m. liockbottom, 9.20 a m; 1.30, 3.40. 5.25,6.25 pm. W'aylarid, 7.15. 7.45, 9.20, 11.40 a m; 1.30, 3.40, 4.20. 5.25, 6 . 6.25 n m. Weston, W altham. 7.15, 9.20, 11.40 am; 1.30,3.40,4.20. 5.25, 6 , 6.25 p in. Waverley, 7.15. 9.20, 11.40 a m; 4.2fs, 5.25, 6 p m. Helmont, 7.15, 9.20, 11.40 a m; 4.20, 5.25, 6 , 6.25 p m. SI N D A* TRAINS. Belmont, Waverley, Waltham, Hudson anil Way Stations to Northampton, 1.15p m. JAMES T. FURBF.R, I». J. FLANDERS. General Manauer. Gen’l Pas’r and Ticket A"cnt N EW YORlv. SEW Ì 1 A.VEN & HARTFORD R.R. Boston and .New York trains via New Haven: LEAVE BÏ WAY OP DTK 6.00 a . M. SDrtnirfiolci and Worcester. 3.30 p. si. 10.00 a . M. New London and Providence. 4.30 v. m. 11.00 a . m . Springfield anil Worcester. 6.00 p . m . 12.00 M. Hartford and N. Y. & N. E. 6.30 v. u. 1.00 p. M. New London and Providence. 8.00 p. M. 8.00 p. M. * Willimantic and N. Y. ¿a S. E. 9.00 p. m. 4.00 p. M. ‘Springtield and Worcester. 10.00 p. m . 5.00 p . m . New l.omIon anrt Providence. 11.00 p . m . 11.00 p. m. *sptitigäeld and Worcester. 6 00 a . it. 11.30 p. M. *New London and 1’rovidence. 7.00 a . >t. •Runs dajlv, including Sundays. Through Parlor or sieeoing Cars by each train. C. T. HEMPSTEAD, Gen’l Paw. Ajput. 0 0 y B L E FALL QIIMMER iTrur YAÍ>L S ervice SE h 10RK RIVER LÍNE -FOR- TWO soctu anil WEST. SPECIAL EXPRESS TRAINS. CONNECTING STEAMERS, r our steamers in commission, PURITAN, i’lii) V I IIR.V CE, P1I.UKD1, 01,11 CO LOST. A Concert is ¡riven in the «¿rand Saloon svery evening by the splendid orchestra attached to »aela vessel. Trains leave Boston from Old Colony Star lon, Kneeiand street, week days as follows: « 1 *. M.—First stieelal exjiress connecting with steamer due to leave Fall River at 7 :30 p. m.; Newport 3 p. ni, ; due in New York 7 :20 a. m. 1 P. M.—Second special express to Fall River, .here connecting with steamer due to leave at 8:23 j, in. for New York direct, due at 7:30 a. m. SUND A V S -Train leaves lioston 7 p. in. Steamer eaves Fall River 8:30; Newport 10 p. m.; due in New York 8 a. m. RETCtCNIN <5—Steamers leave New York week lays, 5:30 and 6:15 p. in. Sundays, 5:30 p. in. Connecting trains due In lioston 6:50 and 9:05 a. m. Annex connection to and from lirooklyn and Jersey City. Ticket*, staterooms and iierth' secured at No. 3 Did State House, corner of \S a-hin^ton and «tate streets, and at the Old Colony Station. Kneeiand street. J. It. KENDRICK. GEO. L. CONNOR, Gen’l Manager. Gen’l I'*ss’r Agt, L. H. PALMEli. Agent. 3 Old State Hoiwe.