The Times from San Mateo, California · Page 29Click to view larger version
October 17, 1959

The Times from San Mateo, California · Page 29

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The Times i
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San Mateo, California
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Saturday, October 17, 1959
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Page 29
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Ford Foundation to Help Finance American Opera BARBARA BLADEN American opera which has struggled for a place in the arts for over ten years has finally been recognized. Under the provisions of a $950,000 appropriation by the Ford Foundation, the San Francisco Opera will participate with the Metropolitan, Chicago Lyric and New York City Opera companies during the next eight years in a plan to seek and produce eighteen new operas written by Americans. In the past poor English translations, often unsingable lyrics, have kept the public from enjoying opera sung in their native language. The tremendous cost of productions and salaries have prevented the larger opera companies from taking a longshnt chance on an unknown composer. As Henry T. Heald, president of the Ford Foundation points oat, "this attempt to undertake a long-term program to build contemporary American operas into the repertoire marks a new struggle in the history of art." Beginning in 1961, these companies hope to produce a new opera by an American composer every other season. The opera may be repeated the following season to help establish it in the repertoire. Upon occasion' each of the three companies may also perform a work produced the previous year by one of the others. The New York City Opera company will launch six new American operas at the rate of one or more a year after 1960. These will be combined with other available American operas as well as with repeat performances of operas established in. its repertoire with the aid of previous Foundation grants. In 1958 they gave $105,000 to this company who had already built a reputation for doing American operas and English translations of older works. In their 1955 season, which covered 34 performances, their repertory included "The Merry Wives of Windsor," "Die Fledeipiaus, "Marriage of Figaro," "Cinderella," "Troilus and Cr'esstda, " written by Sir William Walton and staged by the famous theatrical director Margaret Webster), "The Bartered Bride, 1 " "The Golden Slippers," "The Love for Three Oranges," all in English. It was during the 33rd San Francisco Opera Season that "Troilus and Cressida," sung by Dorothy Kirsten and Richard Lewis, marked the first time a EL CAMINO 15th AVL * SAN MATtO contemporary opera had been presented by the San Francisco company. In 1957 they did an American premiere of Poulenc's "The Carmelites." In 1956 Carlisle Floyd's "Susannah" sung by Phyllis Curtin at the New York City Opera received critical acclaim. He later wrote a second opera "Wuther- ing Heights." While few of the big companies could afford to experiment, smaller companies and colleges were doing full scale productions such as Britten's "Peter Grimes" at Stanford University, Stravinsky's "The Rake's Progress" and University of California's premiere of Session's "The Trial of Lucullus" with a libretto by Bcrtolt Brecht. The S. F. Opera Ring debuted Menotti's "The Medium," "The Telephone," "Street Scene" and a West Coast premiere of the folk opera "Saridhog." Television did its share in helping to establish opera in English with NBC's "Opera Theatre." They did "The Magic Flute," Puccini's "Suor Angelica," Benjamin Britten's "Billy Budd," Menotti's "Amahl and The Night Visitors" the first opera ever commissioned for television. Without this far-sighted subsidy,, it is doubtful whether American opera would find its way into public acceptance for another tea years, but the path is cut toward broadening American culture in a world that has been dominated by classical European works. HURRY ENDS SATURDAY! SOPHIA LOREN -- TAB HUNTER "THAT KDTO OF WOMAN and at 8:45 'FLOODS OF FEAR' 7:05-10:15 Howard Keel STARTS SUNDAY! MANOR OPENS 12:45 SEE IT AT 1:00 - 4:00 - 7:05 · 10:10 ROBERT MITCHUM JULIE LONDON Daring Story of Adventure and Love h the Land of the Burning Sun! iniiE UL COUNTRY GARY MERRILL-PEDRO ARMENDARIZ JACK OAKIE · ALBERT DEKKER · CHARLES McGRAW PLUS CO-FEATURE! ! AT 2:40-5:40-8:50 Adult Entertainment I Continuous Show Saturday! and Sunday from 1 P.M. I JAMES STEWART ,LEEREMICK EVE ARDEN CURTJUR6EM8 MAY Win Rossellini and DeSica To Attend Film Premiere Miss Seyril, author of the Stanford Players' production of "The Moon Besieged," looks at the stage with set designer Richard Hay, where the story of John Brown's famous raid of Harper's Ferry will be enacted in Memorial theater. D A T E B O O K Fourteen feature films -- including notable prize winners from Europe--have been definitely accepted for showing- at the third international Film Festival in San Francisco November 11-24 at the Metro theatre. Roberto Rossellini, the legendary director, and Vittorio DeSica, handsome and provocative actor- director, are both to arrive from Italy for personal appearances at the opening of the San Francisco Film Festival. They will attend the Western premiere showing of the film "H Generale Delia Rovere," which won a Golden Lion of .St. Mark award at the Venice Film Festival and is directed by Rossellini starring De Sica. Film is scheduled - to be presented on the second night, November 12, of the bay area event. Opening night, November 11, will be celebrated by an exciting and colorful musical also from Italy, "European Nights," directed by Alessandro Blasetti, which reveals the world of enter- tainment in the major capital cities of the Continent. Film is a series of striking "after dark" entertainments from the famous cities of Europe. Throughout the two weeks, the S. F. Film Festival will premiere-a new picture each night with repeat performances on the f9llowing night at 6:30 p.m. (Mail orders may be placed at the Metro theatre, Union street near Webster, and tickets are available for all performances at the Sherman Clay box office, in San Francisco at Kearny and Sutler streets. Important films scheduled for screening are such -features as Satyajit ' Ray's third Indian drama of his famous trilogy, "The World of Apu" and the .French drama "Toi, le Venin" (now titled "The Nude in the White Car") directed by the youthful "new wave" film-maker Robert Hossein, -co-starring his wife, Marina Vlady, and sister- in-law, Odile Versois. PENINSULA THIRD BEST SPORT -- San Carlos Community Theater, City Hall, Friday and Saturday at 8:30. SIX APPEAL -- Troupe Theater, Palo Alto, Friday and Saturday, 8:30. CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF-Comedia, Loft Theater, Palo Alto, Friday and Saturday, opens October 23. LA MARIQUITA-Loft Theater, Palo Alto, Thursday, October 22. SAN FRANCISCO A MIGHTY MAN IS HE Nancy Kelly, Geary Theater, nightly except Sunday. SHOW BUSINESS -- Carol Channing, Curran Theater, opens Monday, October 19. THE PINK JUNGLE - Ginger Rogers, Alcazar, nightly except Monday. UNDER MILKWOOD -- Playhouse, Beach and Hyde, Friday and Saturday. THE BOY FRIEND -- Bella Pacific, Saturdays at 8:30, Sundays at 8:00. THE LADY'S NOT FOR BURNING--Bella Pacific, Thursday and Fridays at 8:30. CAN-CAN -- Opera Ring, Saturday and Sunday, 8:30. GUYS AND DOLLS -- Opera Ring, Friday at 8:30. PATIENCE -- The Lamplighters, 236 McAllister, Friday and Saturday at 8:30. 1 MUSIC GEORGIA GIBBS -- Venetian Room, Fairmont Hotel, opens Thursday, October 22. 1NBAL DANCERS FROM ISRAEL -- Opera House, Saturday, October 24. RAY DE LA TORRE-Veterans Auditorium, Friday, October 23. D A N S E S CONCERTANTES and ARIADNE'AUF NAXOS -Opera House, tonight at 8:15. DON GIOVANNI -- O p e r a House, Tuesday, October 20,' at 8:00. OTELLO--Opera House, Thursday, October 22 at 8:00. The above scene of movie stars Robert Mitchum and Julie London is from the new technicolor film "The Wonderful Country" that will open Sunday, October 18, at the Manor theater on a dual program with "Escort West," starring Victor Mature. TONITE! OPEN 6:30 DUE TO LENGTH! ONCE ONLY AT 8:55 production «t«rrlng MILLIE PERKINS THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK »ic« noun* sniumMC SNU ONCE ONLY AT 6:45 CLARK GABLE - DORIS DAY "TEACHER'S PET" Cont. Sunday -- Open 1:45 Diary of Anne Frank-2:00-7:00 Teacher's Pet--4:45 - 9:50 Licia Albanese will sing the special performance of la Boheme on Monday night af the Opera House. Rita Streich will appear in the repeat performance of Ariadne^ Auf Naxes tonight, lorenio Alvary will be heard in Tuesday night's Don Giovanni. (See Datebook.) Grand Opening WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21st CLUB SEVILLE LOCATED IN THE BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HOTEL "THE PARK AVENUE OF THE PENINSULA" COCKTAILS ENTERTAINMENT SAN MATEO · DIAMOND 4-2511 ^ IX 3-0074 [ · Show at 6:30 ^ Gates Open 5:30 ENDS TONIGHT SPECIAL EVENTS "BLUE DENIM" and "THE TRAP" VICTOR' MATURED i \ ^-- STARTING TOMORROW RED and "KING of the WILD STALLIONS Comedia to Open Season With 'Cat' Peter Kump, executive producer for the Comedia Repertory company, unvtiled today a new subscription plan for the company's first subscription series, and he announced the plays for their third season. Introducing a new plan-for season tickets, the Comedia subscription series offers two different kinds of admission coupons, one set for any Thursday or Sunday evening, the second set for any evening a patron may wish to come. The subscriber merely reserves-his seats for any evening and trades the admission coupon for a reserved seat ticket. The difference between the admission coupons;and season tickets is that the coupons are .transferable, and as many may be used for one production or for one performance as desired. Thus, if there is a play which the subscriber does not want to-see, he is not obligated to see it nor does he lose a ticket. 1 - . ,· Opening the'^eason will be Tennesee Williams' pulitzer prize winner, "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof," which is now in rehearsal and will open October 22. Following "Cat On A Hot Tin Roof" will be Bertold Brecht's "The Threepenny Opera," J a m e s Thiirber's delightful fantasy, "The Thirteen Clocks" which will be a special Christmas-presentation; next will be. the funniest of all plays, Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," then another Pulitzer prize winner and West Coast premiere, "Look Homeward, Angel" by Ketti Frings; the last production will be Arthur Miller's adaptation of "An Enemy of the People" by Henrik Ibsend, which has been one of the all time long-run hits off-Brtadway. The plays will feature such well known members of the Comedia company as Rosemary Hay, Philip Schultz, Carolyn Davis, Tom Bissinger, Ligita An- rierson. Eric Silins, Atha Hillback, William Kinsolving, Lynn Boatsman, Charles Barnes, Belinda Rose, Colin Higgins, and Dorothy Wyrnan, in addition to many new talented actors. All of the subscription productions will be produced by Peter Kump; Leslie Abbott will be directing one production, Philip Schultz will be directing the opening production, and the remaining plays will be directed by Seymour Syna, a member of the Actor's Studio who is currently directing an off-Broadway production, and who will be joining the Comedia staff after finishing another production in the studio itself where he has been working directly under Lee Strasber and Eliz Kazan and directing such stars as Mildred Dunnock, Arthur Kennedy, and Ray Walston. The productions will all be designed by Terry Williams, Comedia's art director who has just returned from studying design in Europe, and UURO-GOLDWYN-MlffllU AN JRCOIA PRODUCTION S.ni«l Glenn Ford Debbie Rejwolds CAROL CHANNING Channing At Curran In Music Revue Carol Channing has been signed to star in Charles Gayhor's production of "Show -Business," an intimate musical comedy revue written by Gaynor, in whose production "Lend ah Ear," Miss Channing first rose to prominence a decade ago. The musical, which opens at the Curran on Monday, Oct. 19, will trace various forms of comedy from the minstrel days down to current "musical tragedies' which masquerade as the comedy of this era. For Miss Channing, this marks her return to the legitimate stage after some 70 weeks in top supper clubs across the country. She is remembered on Broadway for such smash successes as. the original "Lend an Ear," the' enchanting Lorelei Lee in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and such diverse roles as Ruth Sherwood in "Wonderful Town" and the re-creation of the movie star siren of the silent screen in "The Vamp." After the ''California . engagements plan is to take the musical on tour in various cities across the country, culminating in a Broadway appearance in the early Spring. International Programs for Opera House Russian, Spanish and Japanese talents will be represented in three brilliant productions to be presented in the Bay area in November under the banner of Moss and Hayman Attractions. The ever-popular Platoff Don Cossack Chorus and Dancers, led by Nicholas Kostrukoff, will be at the Opera House, Friday night, November 6,' and at the Oakland Auditorium theatre, Saturday, November 7. The chorus will present a varied, colorful program with music to appeal to.everyone, hallowed anthems of the church, haunting folk- songs, boisterous regimental songs and gay, peasant dances. All American citizens now, the dashing Cossacks sing t h e i r 1800th American concert sometime this season. The excitement engendered by the sold out houses for Roberto Iglesias Spanish Ballet company on their initial appearance here last season certainly anticipates another capacity audience at the San Francisco Opera House, Saturday night, November 7. lighted by David Seibert who has designed the lighting for every Comedia production to date. For further information about the subscription series, write to Comedia Repertory company, Emerson at Hamilton, Palo Alto. NOW PLAYING 'Maid In Paris' AND "The Ship Thai Died of Shame" LAUREL TONIGHT Doors Open -- 4:45 Feature at 5:30-7:45-10:05 THE MOST SUPRISIN6 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIR OF THIS OR ANY OTHER YEARI IT STAGED WiTH A Kiss K I M ' S SJ60 WEDNESDAY FULL COURSE DINNER · Broiled Halibut · Rooit Spring Lamb · Broiled N.Y. Steak (includes salad, potato. Teg. bererage, dessert) SUNDAY FULL COURSE DINNER · Baked Ham · Boast Prime Ribs · Chicken Fricasve · Broiled N.Y. Steak (Includes salad, potato, veg., beverage, dessert) 12U Donnelly AT*. Burlingame · DI 2-3310 ·--·Continuous From ", Today and Tomorrow! ·THE BESToF EVERYTHING -Plus "MISSILES FROM HELL" Micheal Rennie - Pat. Medina N O W A T Y O C H N E A R B Y FOX WEST COflST THEATRES CARLOS LY 3-8031 "BEST OF EVERYTHING" "MISSILES FROM HELL" FOX REDWOOD EM 9-2969 "10 SECONDS TO HELL" "CAST A LONG SHADOW- S T A N F O R D D A 4-4751 "BEST OF EVERYTHING" "MISSILES FROM HELL" It's a Joy Ride All the Way! ConL from 1:00 P.M. Today and Tomorrow 3:25 - 7:00 · 10:30 COMEDY-ROMlWCt AT ITS IISTI WETRO-GOLOWYN.MAVER piesenls Ui «ficm« PRODUCTION -GLENN FORD DEBBIE REYNOLDS wra A loss' GUSTAVO ROJO-EVA GABOR-FRED CLARK Mh EDGAR BUCHANAN TONIGHT. 8:35 --"BLUE DENIM" PALM 17TH-ONE BLOCK OFF EL CAHINO * Fireside 51015 SUNDAY 1:00 -- 4:50 -- 8:45 THIS EARTH is MINE ! ££*· ..~TheCrq that Rocked THE VALLEY OF THE SUN . w,TM KENT SMITH · KEN SCOTT CINDY ROBBINS CINEMASCOPE A UNIVtliSAUNTERNATIONAL PICTURE · A VINTAGE HIODUCTION AND AT 3:05 -- 6:55--10:50 ·JHIRLEY JONES ft f*---*--3±?*j; , ROGER SMITH · CAM WUttK now man fern M-mmum · A UNIVERSAL-INURNAIIONAl PICTURE "IT STARTED WITH A KISS" STARTS WED. Page 8A SAN MATEO TIMES - WEEKEND Saturday, Oct. 17, 1959 Saturday, Oct. 17, 1959 SAN MATEO TIMES - WEEKEND Page 9A