The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 5Click to view larger version
November 19, 1899

The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 5

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The Atlanta Constitution i
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Atlanta, Georgia
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Sunday, November 19, 1899
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Page 5
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II PUS TO THE FAST CONTEST- There Was Half a Minute To PlayWto Darkness Interfered. CONTEST FIERCE AND CAN THIDS Were Evenly Matched and OIspid Their Training. igBOBIFEfLSBIDLYIVfRDEni Toys Declared hey Should Have Sad the Game Georgia- Concedes Victory Crowds Over- ran Held and Caused Decision. UBUR.- and Georgia engaged In the bitterly contested football game yesterday played In Atlanta. In many a day. Through two- five minute halves the contest was waged with a dogged spirit on both aides that would brook no defeat. and with the crowd ot too people in the grand stand and packed around the side lines the result was kept In doubt up to the last moment. With only thirty seconds of play left but with darkness already at hand and a. wild. excited crowd surging over the. geld Referee Rowbotham called the game and under the rules of the Southern In- terooUegiate Association declared the COM 0 to 0. Th orange and blue of Auburn had waved exultantly only a moment before. for the sturdy moleskin heroes from the neighboring state bad succeeded in crossing Georgia's goal line twice and a hard earned victory lay within their reach. When the referee blew his whistle for the end of play the scare stood U to 6 In fa. vor of the' orange and blue. With Jut one more down with the ball on Georgia's yard line the end of the second halt would have arrived and Auburn would have been declared the victor and the decision of the referee although made In justice was a. bitter one for the friends of the Alabama team to accept. The conditions that appeared to make the ruling of Referee Rowbotham a. ne cessity were such as should never have occurred on any gridiron that has the ad- vantage of police protection. As darkness came on it was impossible in the bleach. era and grand stand to distinguish the play and with no obstacle in the way the crowd surged into tho field mingled with the players and made further progress a matter of impossibility. Auburn Made a Protest. Coach Helseman protested that the nil- lnrot the referee was an ustlce to his men that II the official had. allowed the gains to proceed for more than five mm- Utu in darkness he. should order the field cleared sod permit the men' to finish the half. Fifteen minutes before the final decision was announced Auburn had re quested the officials to call the game. but at that time. Referee Rowbotham did not think the conditions demanded such a ruling. While Auburn's protest was being heard the Georgia boys stood by In silence. In different many of them to the result as they. took the manly position that. Auburn lied triumphed and was therefore entitled to the- victory whatever the end of a technical discussion might. be. In the decision that made the game a tie the referee was backed up byUmplre Taylor. of Birmingham. who although a. Just official has always been regarded by many as a friend of Auburn. How the Teams Compared. Auburn came to town with an Alabama Coon II mascot and this tact may have tad something to do with the final result for although Auburn scored the greatest number of points there were very few who could say in what respect the Georgia boys had been outclassed. In the multiplicity of trick plays that never tall to delight a crowd. the orange and blue excelled dazed their opponents by the length of their gains and never lost confidence In what looted for the first ten minutes of slay like a hopeless task. Those who saw the clumsy sluggish team that represented Georgia in the S wanee game would not have recognized the same men yesterday as they broke Wt a. flash through the Auburn line for live and ten yards at every plunge. It was the same team without the confidence In themselves whlcfli has be n the Betting fault of Georgia teams of yere. Defeat for them had been the best medicine to bring victory and It was no fault of theirs that they did not win. Time only thing that marred an otherwise beautlul. manly game was the Inclination on the part of some Oft Auburn's men to give utterances to petty. unmanly remarks about their Georgia antagonists. There were cries of baby and give UP" uttered Just after Georgia had demonstrated her ability to go through Auburn's line for five and ten yards at every rush and It Auburn always meets as fair an antagonist as she did yesterday the uege will be in luck- irst Half Was Georgia's Way. kin the tint halt of the- game an the kthat goes with a football gazes wa lderl ut to pitalof tlnually in Auburn's territory. By successive bucks and close end runs Georgia carried the ball on down the field to Auburna ten yard line bringing out the strongest points of her play and causing the Auburn rooters much discomfort. The ball was lost by Georgia before the coveted goal was reached however and Auburn accepted the offensive witlq a will. An attempt at center showed that bucking in that direction would be bootless arid the wearers of the orange and blue tried a trick play that brought better re cults. in a bewildering complication of passes back of the line Yarbrough finally took the ball arid spurted down the field for forty yards. before toe was stopped by Mecuteheon. The trick was beyond the comprehension of the Georgians and a. look of dismay was plain on their faces. Another trick carried the ball still further In the direction of Georgia's goal and it was but a few moments before n was ylng on the spheroid back of Ph line. The first half disclosed the tact that the offensive work of both teams was unusually strong. Georgia going through Auburn's line almost at will while the Georgians had equal difficulty In stopping the peculiar style of play adopted by Auburn. The only successful attempts to break through the red and black line were made by BIYlns the sturdy little Auburn fullback whose work was one of the features of the game. Slmcox at right. halt tor the Georgians their escorts and- presented a fine appearance. The Georgia sponsors were Miss Julia. MCWlhorier of Lexington and Miss Annie Fltten of Atlanta They were- accompanied by William S. Blun and Charley R. Black. The. Auburn sponsors' carriage contained Miss Emily McPoucald and Miss Adalaide Howell. who were escorted by Rey. folds Tlchenor and R. T. Dorsey. The retails of the Game. It was only a few minutes past 3 o'clock when the two teams trotted out on the field. The ban was passed several times. while the crowd cheered with all their might. In the grandstand and on the bleachers the sentiment was. about evenly divided there being any number of people with Auburn colors and any number with Georgia's red and black. Both teams played good hard ball. A large number of the onlookers thought that Georgia. showed up better and expressed themselves as of the- opinion that the eleven. was the better of the two. But many thought Auburn had the best team and that their men more spirit. For time. straight hard football Georgia was undoubtedly the better of the two elevens. but for football modern tricky hard work fine. steady. judgment. displaying football Auburn was the better. Georgia made more gains and long. 11 pains by bucking the line. running the ends anti kicking the ball. but Auburn made more gains on trick work using her fake passes. bucks and other tricky plays in on admirable manner. And this work showed excellent judg- ment on the part of her trainer. Mr. Ileiseman who saw that his team could not win by trying to. buck over the line of the big heavy Georgians. When he saw this an V he saw It at the very first of the game he had his men to resort to their tricks. So the game was won as for six yards allowed for. five yards Pelbari thencarried the spheroid Into Georgia's territory two1 yards and Blvlu three yards. Theneight yards were lost In an attempt to skim around the left end. Skeggs lost yards ttylnl' the right end. Bivlns then kicked. twenty yards. Georgia Played nard. Slmcoxtried the. line. for. three yards. Young did thesame for three yards more. Ooodlnr made two yards Slmcoi two McIntosh two. yards. after which Finnegan dropped the ball. losing fifteen yards. Slmcox went around the left end for twenty yards behind excellent Interference Ritchie made tour Hamilton four. Slmcox three. Goodlng six filmcox twelve McIntosh tour Slmcox. five. Young five McIntosh seven' and Slmcox eight yards. McCutcheon tumbled' the. ball losing five yards. McIntosh made five and Slmcox five yards. Then the ball went over on a. tumble Georgia was near the goal line of Auburn and this fumble wasespecial ly costly. Feagln made twelve yards around the right end Then on a trick. pass and fake made forty. yards around the tight end. McCutcheontackled him well and saved a. goal by so doing Blvlna then. bucked the line and behind fine Interference made thirty-four yards. lie followed this with a six yard buck. Here Auburn tried a fake kick alter Divine failed to gain through the line. Again' they tailed to make any gain and the ball went over on downs. McIntosh. klskod the Fall forty yards but It was fumbled on the up and secured again by the Georgians. Simcox went at the right end. for thirty-four yards. but in-doing so he resorted to foul interference and the. ball was carried back and given to Auburn. On a double pass trick liuguley made eight yards. Slceggs made eight yards. more on a bukc of the center. Park tried the tine twice for seven yards. Elvins then did the same thing for six. and Feagln for two yards. Feagln on a very pretty tricy play made fifteen yards for a touchdown. The ball was passed by the center to the guard who In turn passed It through the hands of the quarter to Feagin. who ran out at the right tackle. It. looked as if the Auburn team was bucking the left- hand side of the line and was an effective trick requiring- quick. fast work. Yarbrough kicked the goal and the score stood 6 to 0 with twenty-seven minutes of time used. The ball was. kicked off by McIntosh and some pretty work done by the Georgia boys as Welt as the Auburn' fellows- At one time Skeggs was thrown with a loss of twenty yards by FInnegan on an attempt to round the' right end for a gain. The play was a pretty one and TB Y rtTW WWi SL-iII 4 ) was In the best form of any on the team and whenever given the ball he carried it over for a gain. The ability which Slits- cox displayed In following his Interference was wonderful In view of the slight knowledge southern college men have of tills essential. In the first halt the largest gains were made for Auburn by Yarbrough and Park while Skegs and Feagin both carried the ball' forward at. times. Second Half Was Auburn's. In the second half with the score S to 0 In Auburn's favor the Georgians started out with a determination to win and taking the ball from their opponents started with it down the field. The efforts of Auburn to head off the rush v/re futile and the ball was finally taken across the goal line in triumph by Slmcox. The Georgia goal was kicked easily but the score was not to remain a tie very long. Auburn took up the offensive again and forced the spheroid down the field at every run and did not stop until the. goal of the Georgians was reached. This time the goal was missed In an open kick and the score stood 11 to 8. The game demonstrated how difficult it Is forone team to stop a system of play It knows nothing about and the play of no team. is probably more unlike than that of Georgia and Auburn. Auburn practically gained at will and the same was true of Georgia although by reason of the different systems employed the gains of the latter were necessarily short- er than those of Auburn. Game Was a Social vent The game yesterday was a social event and many hundreds of beautiful society ladles of the city attended. A number of elegant carriages and smart traps were on the reservation for carriages and in them were' some of'.the most prominent young ldiesofthe city iivn fOTV iw Pt he ftwbt Ler driven outln carriajres. ccompaniedby rt- jwj i S& W tar as playing was concerned on the one point. of Judgment. Had Auburn players not used their tricks and mass plays" they would have undoubtedly lost the game. But tricks and mass work count as good football. And consequently the game should have gone to the Alabamians by a score of 11 to 6. But when the game. was called and It was rightly done for it was too dark to play and had been for two or three minutes the. official score. according to the rules of the game stool 0 to O. Of course. the official score decides the bets according to all precedents ever set in the past. And money bet on the game will be taken down. Before the game was begun an official protest against the following members of the Georgia team was entered by the Auburn captain Ilnnegan Gqff Young Hamilton and Slmcox. It was claimed that these men were players who had been at Athens as soldiers and whose services' were afterwards secured by Georgia and that they were not bona fide student players. The Play Begins. Captain Feagln won the- up for Auburn and chose. the ball. Georgia de. cided upon the west goal. The men lined up and the referee blew his whistle. which net put the ball in play. Martin kicked for Auburn. the bill go- lug only ten yards and an Auburn man tailing on It. Feagln tried the line but did not gain. Yarbrough- kicked fifteen yards al the ball la Georgia. Slmcox tried the line lot five yards Mclntosh followed for tour Imcox. tour. Ritchie tour McIntosh two and Young seven yards. The Georgia. men. were finding the line easy and were playing hard. Hero Young tumbled and the. ball was Au burns. Yarbrough went forfour yards. Park got four yardsbut on an. end' run Skaggs failed to gain and Georgia secured. the ball. Mclntozhmade three yards through- the' Unev Young went around. the left end' for. fif teem yards. Golf' tore- through the line for three yards. Slmcoxsecured tour yards. Dot the ball. Is f umbledand an. Auburn tnajrfallsuoHjt. was loudly applauded. Another time film- cox made twelve yards and oM Young lost tour on an end play. After a few plays the time of the first halt was up. with the score standing 6 to 0 In Auburn's favor. The Second Halt. Shannon kicked off and Skeggs passed the ball to Feagln who made twenty yards. Park then made three yards. but fumbled the ball' and a Georgian secured it. Stmox and oYung made two yards each. Slmcox lx Mclntosh two. Ritchie two. McIntosh two. Slmeox two Slmcox two yards and Young lost the ball on a. tumble. The ball was on Auburn's forty- yard line and lns struck the line effectively for fifteen yards. A tumble was made. however and Georgia once more had the ball. The Georgians played for all they were worth. Hamilton bucked for three yards Stmcox three Goodlng four Siracox two McIntosh two and Slmcox tour yards. The. ball Is In two yards or the goal and McIntosh strikes the line for halt a. yard. and the supreme effort Is asked of Simcox Who plunges right at Auburn with all his might and makes the distance. The crowd yells and McIntosh kicks an easy goal. Time. 12 minutes. The score was now 6 to Auburn Scores Again. Watkins went In the game here In. LINING UP SHOWING POSITION OF GEORGIA'S BACKS. stead of Shannon. who went to full back. McIntosh retiring. being badly hurt on arms and legs. Yarbrough kicked. thirty yards. Shannon returned the ball ten yards. Slmcox fumbled and' Young kicked twenty yards Huguleymuffed the ball and It was Georgia's. Slmcox made eight yards. Young two. Simeox two Young two. Shannon ten. Younriost five. Shan non made seven. Young- four. Shannon two and tour and two twice. Goodlng three- Young one and Shannon twoyards. Slmcox falls- and the ball goes over on. downs. Divine made four and thirtyyards on a buck and run after the tackier released him before flown was yelled. Then' on a double' pass trick made twenty- five yards- Dlvina sattXoriOxf and' FfVi f jf rf Yarbrmigb. We have many thousand letters from women who owe therheatth tOPerina MF Jennie Johnsoni Vice President ChicagoTeachers' Federation. Miss Jennie Johnson vice Chicago Teachers' Federation an teacher In the Healy school of Chicago. writes the tolowing from 3118 Lake Park avenue Chicago During the past ten years I have been a teacner in Chicago and have oltan found myself worn out and In need of a tonic. Among the different remedies I have tried none have helped me more than ru I Una it especially helpful. In cases of catarrlt of the stomach it restores the functions of nature. Induces sljcp d builds up in entire system. It has net only beets a help to sue but several of my ulends who were teachers nd who have used It speak very highly of the recuperative qualities of Fe I therefore gladly give It my hearty Indorsement. Mrs. Summerfleld Williams of Colum- tla Tenn. writes I was troubled with female weakness and suffered intensely. I saw an advertisement Qt Fe and decided to take it. It cured me and I believe I would not. be living today if it had not tten for Fe I intend ta continue taking it for I believe I owe' soy life to ru Mrs. McKee Rankin who recently appeared In the first New York presentation of Herman Hyermans play. Tue Ghetto Is an ardent friend of the national catarrh remedy ru.na. In speaking of its merits In a. letter written Irons New York city shesays No singer should be without A bottle of Fe In ve. The Inventor deserves the thanks of all to whom I clear voice Is a means of livelihood. As a rtrnedy for catarrh of the head onl ns made six yards and the ball is within a few. yards of the goal line. Park is given the ball and Is simply. pushed around the left" end for a gain that put he ball within one toot of the goal line. Again Park Is called upon. and this time le is picked from the mass of players behind the coveted line. The ball was ticked out to the yard tine and caught by Harvey. The goal wall missed by Steggs and the score stood U to 6. It. was getting dark and the field was crowded by people from the bleachers ut the game was resumed. Shannon kicking off for thirty yards. .BI made three yards. Pelham makes a short gain and then a tumble occurs. Feagln makes wo yards. Bivlns one. Pelham two Pea- gln two. Blvins nothing Blvins one yard and the ball goes over on downs. Slmcox and Shannon made five yards in the dark with the crowd around them. and McCutcheon kicked twenty yards. Skeoggs was given the ball and the. play- ers massed themselves up like a round trill. Suddenly Skeggs shot out from this ball and sped down the field for seventy yards. the longest gain made. It was very dark FInnegan was hurt and a sQuabble arose. Then there was some talk and the game was called by Referee RowbothamO1 on account of darkness. and the official score announced as 0 to 0 on account of the. tact that the second halt was not played out entirely. When the game was called It was. found that only half a minute was left of. the thirty-five to be played and the Auburn men felt badly hurt over the decision. The teams lined up as follows GEORGIA. Position. AUBURN. Goodn& left end .11 and Harvey. Hamilton left tackle. BTaawell Lindsay left guard Butler Shannon and Watkins center Gun 11 Golr right guard. Martin Ritchie. Captright tackle Pt1ham Finneran right end Park MeCtitcheon quarterback Huguley Young. left half. Feagin Capt. Slmcox right half. Skeggs Mdntbsh and Shannon. fullback. Btvlngs Officials Referee Mr. Rowbothl1l of Tufts college Mr. Taylor. or Yale. Timers. Sullivan and Woolley. Linemen. Hewiette or Georgia and Harvey of Auburn. Time of halves. 53 minutes. Auburn Men Talk. After the game icveral of the Auburn men were seen and expressed themselves Very forcibly about the game belrg called within one-half of a minute of time and th score being declared. 0 to 0. They claimed they won the game and had they been given one more chance to pass the WI. whether or not any c. re had been made. they would have been satisfied. But to call the game was to deprive them of the official victory al though it was admitted that theywon the playing score. We bad worked hard. for the game and by good football had it won 2 Coach HlsemJn and I feel very badly that the game was called. There was only one-halt of a minute to play and it was taking victory from between our teeth before we could enjoy It. Georgia played hard ball but we had tile gains won. and It should be given to Us. The. captain and others of the Auburn argregaticn expressed themselves In the same way and are. all deeply hurt. Wt toe affair resulted as It did. Georgia Said Auburn Won. The captain and members of the Georgia left the city for Athens last night at 10 o'clock and the Auburnltes will leave today. Before they left several members of the Georgia team wen askjd to express themselves about the outcome. Aubuen won the game by hard work remarked Young the halfback and should have been given It It was very distressing' that the game should have been. called when t was. and no one stands more ready to accord the men from Alabama a victory a clean hard. fought-for victory than I and other 3 of the Georgia eleven. They won the game on the score o U to I by football and. it Is to be re' retted that they were not allowed to play the remainder of the game and secure the full benefit of their work. A number of other Georgia boys wore cf the same opinion. All rtood ready to give the honors to Auburn though they declared their team made the b showlflcand that It. rould win were the played egalu jFtonegaj a badly/ urtln the ram hl back being painfully.- sprained. It. Is Ilossibie that be wlilbe unable to play stain this NUoa" on this account lie WnraW w4ta tho vthers ty threat. It Is I believe. without an equal. Even a slight cold or cough absolutely ic capacitates a singer for business. Pena Is an effectual preventative against these nearly inevitable affections. Mrs. McKee Rankin Actress. Catarrh Is the source' of a frightful list ANUAL NEdOBIAL SERVICES. Knights of Pythias Win Give Splendid Exercises. Th regular annual memorial service of Empire lodge No. 47. Knights of Pythias will be held at their hall In the Ktser building at. 7:30 o'clock this afternoon. All the K of P. lodges In the oily will take part In the exercises nd all members are requested to be present It possible. The programme will be as follows Opening exercises t r the of Empire lodge attsnted by the uniform rank. Music by orchestra. Hymn by choir. I Would Not LIT AU ways. Addrrss Chancellor Comminder C. E. Hall. Response On behalf of Empire Lodje Brother Robert B. Bryies. Solo-Mrs. C. T. Batch. Rpoiste on behalf of-Atlanta Lodee Brother Robert Alston. fc.- Music by orclestri Response on behalf of Capital City Lodge- Brother W. it Harrison. Hymn by Choir. The Beautiful Golden Gate. Kef ponse on behalf of Adolph Brandt Lodge- Brother H. A. EthrJdei Solo Master Harry Austin' Response on behalf of Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers Brother C. T. Caleb Music by orchestra. Response on behalf of Gate dry Lodge-.e Brother James I ley and Brother 171111401 U. Mctauflin. Hymn by choir Rest Response on behalf of the Grand Lodge- Brother Wallace Rhodes district grand deputy. Solo-Mrs. C. T. IlaIch. Response on behalf of Delphi Lod Brother Thomas H. Jeffries. Hymn by choir Come Unto Mo. Music by orchestra. f taeaes It is silent and Insidious In its ravages but It pervades nearly every tnutenoid. and hove's joke a pestilent's er every hamlet and city its our land. CaUrih and Its legitimate-consequences bays desolated more hearthstones made. wretched more happy- lives and ended snore brilliant careers. than all other dls. et combined. Catarrh may end In deafness blindness. los f smeJ loss of taste. or the entire loss of voice. Diphtheria brorehitls pneumonia consump. toots and pleurisy begin' almost always' as the result ola catarrhal attaclc The worst. forms of dyspwsia. and Bright's disease of the kidneys are. also the direct LuuseciUence of neglected cases of acute catarrh.- Miss Annie' Longhenry 2212 West School street. Des Moines Iowa writes"For over two years I had been troubled with catarrh before I heard of Dr. Hartman's book called Health and Beau. ty. I read It. and wrote to the doctor.- who answered my letter promptly. i began taking treatment as soon as pus. Bible. Tongue cannot express. row I suffered with iny throat. I didn't feel Ilke my-Annie Ix ngtienry. self for over a year. My case was a stubborn one. 53 I began taking ru and now I cannot praise it enough. Any one Who has chronic stsOUld try Dr. itartm1fl-'ie will help any ene. I feel grateful for what the doctor has done for me end would not do without runa I am well and. healthy. and feel hapry. I thanK tile doctor. for his kindness. When the victims of acute. catarrh escape all of the above mentioned lablt JU there remains the great probability Pt- Its ending in hsonic catarrh. It Is t-eyon1 the descriptive powers x f lan- guago to the peculiar mls-jry of a subject of chi catarrh. While tnese patients do not sulfer the acute pain or. rneumaiisin and neuralgia r the lndt. scribble anguish of diseases' of the nervous system yet It. would be very difficult to paint the picture of woe which usually befalls the sufferer from. chronic catarrh. it- would le. Indeed folly for one. to describe In detail. title exasperating- die- a. question as to. whether. Fe can be relied on to cure all such cases. Dar ing the many years u vhlch Peru bas been put. to' test in all formaana stages ofacute and chronic catarrh r. ) tne year baa put. this remedy to greater test than the past year. Fe is the. acknowledged catarrh- remedy of the age. Dr. Hartman the. compounder. or Fe has written a. book on the phases. Jf catarrh peculiar to women. entitled Health and Beauty. It will be tent'.free to any address by The Pa Medicine Company Cumin- bus. Ohio. TEACHERS RECEIVE SALARY. Commissioner Glenn Mails 260000 In Checks to County i Officers. State School Commissioner Glenn began yesterday to-- mall cheeks to' the' county school corrml slcners for the payment of state teacters for another months werk The amounts which will be sent to. the county school oramissloners will aggregate stout J260000ca one-fifth of the entire pehool fund for the year. Thla payment is being made about.-a. month earlier. than the dateof the correspond ins payment last year and eaiier than' the teachersand officials had expected it. The. date of. this payment has depended rot upon the state officials.- but upon the condition Ot the. treasury and just s soon asthere' were svaiiatile fund pn hand tstiificient to make the payment It' was Tjegun State Treasurer SpOer and hla assistant Captain C. T. Furlow. have managed the treasury alralrs as to-be able. to make this. payment at the veryearliest t me pczsible When this payment Is completed. Three-fifths f the school fund for the' year will have been paid. The governor the. treasurer and the state selool commissioner hays made every effort to pay the teachers. as promptly as possible and are gratified at. their ability to make' this" payment cue- month earlier- than formerly. The better Judge you are' of Champagne the morelikely you will be to choose Cooks Imperial Champat/ e Extra Dry. A WORD TO THE WISE. You wm need several articles In our line for Xmas and selecting now you will have a grand assortment of new goods from which to chores. DON'T POSTPONE a. mission of this kind until Just-before the holidays lse you will find OUT- store crowded and experience considerable difficulty in getting waited on. OUR STOCK THIS SEASON Is overflowing with the latest products of the Gold and Silversmiths' art. We lave. the largest and flnsst tock of Diamonds at. old. prices We have thegreatest variety of chatelaine Watches We have th most supert stock of Holiday Novelties and a complete line of Cut Glass. Sterling Silver Ware Loather oils etc. and above alfc we guarantee you the. best goods at the lowest prices. RAlLIED Si RPflK CI P Jewelers and Silversmiths IllHlLII 06 ULIllALLL 31 While hair St. Atlanta Ga For the benefit of our town customers we have prepared a large of Diamonds Watches Jewelry Silver Ware and Holiday Novelties which will 00 ready for mailing about December 1st. FREE. It Interested wilte us. WI F WESLEY You want the biggest value for your money and our store Is where to setlt The Suits and Overcoats we : Offer at 750. are the equal In every detail Oft suits and overcoats offered elsewhere at J10. Thi Suits and Overeats we J Offer at 1006. are the equal In every way of suits and overcoats offered elsewhere at 15. This Is not. fiction. but THAT WE CAN EASILY PROVE. BY THE SOLID MERIT OF' OUR CILOTHING NOT HOW CHEAP. BUT HOW GOOD. HOW STYLISH and T how LASTING Our prices are always the LOWEST. a. Ill order for these suits and overeats was given to the manufacturers several months ago and we will. notwithstanding the great advance In price sinceplaeing this order give you the benefit or' our original purchases. which means to yon The Greatest Valu in Winter Suits and Overcoats at 750 and 1006 Ever Offered. Overcoats and Suits that. for good quality. Style tailoring and perfect St cannot be equaled by any other store forless than J10 to SIS. If yoUjWould save money on clothing see us this week. Respectfully m 0. WITH AUBURN tEDRGIAS6 REFEREE ENDS ANn RESULT ISlOMW I Plaf When Dar ness OfflcialScore Is 0 to O t 1 CL AH T earns h nly l URN FEELS BADLY IYER DECISION it. Game Victory-Crowds enga. d nLVV1 mOil L w lrit el Th. o o succe ed wlthJnthelr whlst e e Au1 urn it' ref e altho h 1.8 ne- C sslty ofpolce mln l I I I helIhould I mentl I l-1tt n re- o' 8 b In- vlctorywhatever mo IIUe tho Ial eatest Iaboys da first 61ug lsh S&- reco Illzed broke. ike been otyere. WiLS an COllege hf First Georgia. i ekthatgoes with football mew a t i on-down 11 no rooters Georgia a wl I re- t ssesback th 3I t heon. G rglans on the pe uUar onl lUrd fullb k. Slm ox lndpresetited pear nce. spon r. ero The were RT severalt1mes even.- I O blac hadthe modern t toot football th ma e g lns I ju g- t y this-ant It he i I s f i a iardi d' lici edfo l1ve then carried terrttorrtworarda threo7 Then eight Iolt tolk1Di. SJt IP h 6ard. Biiinsthen Geo g1a. 8l ricox tried yar Y oune dkUitesame two. two attetwhlch balllosln endtor ty' u s bohJndexcellent RltchJemade thr e Go d111ir s 8lmcoxt1ve dveMc- Cutc eon fivoyardsTllentho was' especial- F a1n m de t elve fa e buck' made ards sodotnl a1I1x b 1I 1 all was on. I1ne up In doing was. 1\0 1 YarbroUKhklclEd oal O. 50 e t one I i 1 10 p.- J difj t1 1-- t o \.I..c x. :1\ 3 Jtl 11' Z R 4 i t 15. nRIlJ p. tXl Q i 1 y f t L1NE BY Kl w' enever col ge tlm toO ul urns a finl ly oal oal e sny to t1heplay morounUko 8ndAuburn. true tr b socl t cltyaUended. numberot smUt w re. es 1U14. were f the m 8t' PrOD lJ1 t r gl tr Jttm e utilDearrlares jb7 r 1i1 it W F 0. W MfrV I I was con erned con eQuently 1 for. mone was an. studen cld d an' I the-line th andYoune. IIeven p1 1ng Youn a d .u- for four ard& fouryardacbut J1 to. cIntosJ1 JJ Id tbr eards thro UneYoung thelen' tortltteen 7ar Slmcox. al1 1s' l d man' fallson Jt. q 0 nsV the big fuUb mrijuJiM tii iqW' J.- C" i' d pu d. tho. six Slm ox on ards cox. I 6. l I BAC I tullback. le t n 8hncoxtumbled yardaHuguleYlI ulred thoba11 orgtas twoY ounl' YO Iost E ve thteeY un oiJ JUmcoxtal1aiiiLpdthe1laILloeaover d anod J' . n& nc1 tkJezoTeleued ThenC1 paastr tw t7 yIUbu o m. P rr J. s t Woui i I. N T DWOMENWHO USE PERUNA 1 W V y thoumUetterslroni WOInen iheirhea iht ilecnal t I MissJennie Jo nson V hi ago i eachers' r de tio rcsl t and" a ei n e h n Pt c ou ft. rem d e fun tIns sl ep Ih'\ hl h lp me. a ft ferpe i. o r r iJ' I If lroub I. Intt 11J1eiy. It It. mLr eJgK g tt Ifri r i Sd lt h I m rtt5 she. says lo tle Pe' runa ins the he but two vlns b Il b 1 as I alle I as. I Han lltc n le t I Watklns C trlght McC tche n Fea n rlt h t Referee Tuf YaI I Hew e e. GeQr la. 0 Att r E press d vcryronlblr a cut th the I th y one or fC al- they. won tbeplalnr fo otballhad bild- be rare aJnt won. s burn a egaticn expreslledtliemselns 11 d ply dl L l ft i sl' uJ4 It. it A1abartta victory-then mem S Oe rgia hey ontholICore of to. to. b theyWEro th u. theltwork. olother dthe A1I. toodreadT tolltlvo Ihe-.bonora toAubu UJe7declareI lna t ho and IT h111Ji j 1l1ttbaek b ilg p4JnfuUYlPraIn IJSltJ bewihl be unab16t aIntbW fPr - ii i Si ii h 4. ra old t Ilrfi rv VI alnst McI ee I Catarrh ANNUAIo DJrtORIAL SERVICES. I Will The annual memorlalservtce I 47 thlsarternoon i the wl l oJnd aro pr 3 t by the officers 1 Not 1r a CO U1derc" EHlL i Lodge-Brother I R polUe of- Lodge-Brother R c i1t Ieatn Lod nepolOse Solo od beh Llf m c E ther nalch\ I beh. Lod 1. l eyand HcLlLu Un choir. I I I bycholr cflbeaiesItlssllent nd ts lit t hove II a or ourlaDtL dlol8tedmtre s. happy. CatMrh.mayend- .lou- f sme H e f of a formso dI8 ase h. nce. Lon nrTmz Deslo esIowa tw e S iUldBeau. tYl It-and wboa swereJmy Jetter .ta. ngtreat m nt soon J 5 ble. Ton1lecannjt tow n didntteellIk my- Anri1 LorigJ eriry. s 1for case Pe na.and 10 1. cannotpra158 baschronI catanh. try. DriHart l1ewll 1. doCt r hasdoncf me P ru na. 1. 1. thankUi vll11msof es ape allot the-.above P1entlonedilabIF there greatprObabtllty chllniccatarrh IttJI thedetcrptlv of dage portnlthelecuUar mis rof tne 8 tneacute o nelralgiar th oussystem ygy.-dimcult U I tlJ ge P e oir e c 1nde dtony descri e unless one b I l View some relief or cure bf thse pOple who are so. untor- tunate as to be afflicted. Isno longer P ru rel1 illsu-h asesIFl1r. tars InYhlch In' forms and f acute andchrori1c o pas ear 1s t eage Har rnan. r enUUedHealth to-any olum-- GIe rai s 26Ooa Ch cks t tate y tocmall unty lor. Theamountswhkh wll1besenf cotontyschOJl w1llaigr \60,000. U' Ont nfthOf ndtortboye rjhJa t about. tbodateoftho coresp nd. 1 of Iaatyear andespler' teachers' an dt:1- t Th dateoft 1s nthe stateomclals butupon an 1juStas soon. as theta 0 1' haritlsufficlent. makethepaYJI1entlt wascl gun. Sp r mana ed 6Oas m. e. atthovet earilest tmepus1ble. When thl tScomplet 4. Of tundfor and thee mad the. aspcsslble andaro to' o earl1erthanformerly. bett r of. more likely ookslmpertal Chamr eExtr& THENISE 9 .and by assor ment oodll trQmwhlch JdnduntU just before tlndoUJ expe ence SE ON pr duc- ottheGoldand Sl1venm1thsrt. * v a e e f Il 18iruJ t 1tles acomp ete stiver LeathrO cand abQLlIa be t JowestJlrtces. MAIER BERK ElEJewelersSl1dSilversMIt. 3IWhllefiaIlSlllariaiBa of DlamondsWatches aboutDe mlJer1lt Inter- o WFWESLEY 1 c' blggestva u for70ur- mon yand i togeUL .n.d- w r at7S0. eQ aIln every atloT1 Overcatswe r z/- Offerat IO. c ar theequal e ery olre edels wher t Janot. BJlHE 80LlDM RIT NOT BVT andPARTJctffiARLYbowLA6TINO. ar n1oorder for. theses theinanufa turereveral a. dwllwt1Jnot thlltanding- greitadvanc ncii1n alnc plae1n ctnyolJ. th ourortgtrurl p rch8seswhICh mea tO Gr atet inWifiterS its 11dOvelltc9 ts t75oJlnd lO - EyerOfet d. V I THE C1OTBTITUTION ATLAIT& GA BUNDAY OVEMBER 19 1899 5 I I 6 CONTESTANO. IS A DRAW as PI fficiI Score I Tral ng1 L AU8llA 1 i Ui 0 8 y rh icoreQtoO. a fa- the ' n i ade 1 de- o t l 1 e t h i 1 k i e t I renar rus College In thegame 9. uek that WU en Auburn's side but ipIe oC this tthePmeroid was keptsimCOff wiul or ap- theelevenwas yardladilOWedfOrflVYUdL Pelha threeyardL. threeyardstrying 8ltheox the same fiv You g seven was trickpass. MeCutcheon tackled .e- wa c d k' I a 0 t'i.-- de4 ot 4 tj t T5' te It jt q. e i. p. qe s' 1 W5r t5 1t 4 .1- :1 1 4k\ 4'1 t 4 a a. 1bi. C t.et5 e 44i i1 is a a e4a C 5 s. C 1 st a- AjI gs a.- Jj-- 0-I i c st e. I't s g r"- r o A 5OT 1' i rnt UR1NG'- t"- o gamyesterday of The spofliorL ofthe to teimi were 2 L .L 6 tw Got de- u yards. but. endgun line tore-through accused tn Itt Divins the fullbaekwent a tbeUeae' oi Itlt hie eor c x two and andhannon on foil thirty yard. anlswsafter The ar11 Huguley bucked or six Peihani os jeyesrds Ie cMbit d j NOTED WOMEN WHO 5. A a Mssjennieiohnson gresIclt and t ap- wa CsPt rlght fullbaokDvings i scr de- w wan" th hv victory-a ba showIng same. played as hurt h game his' t ertoAtenawttia tbGthsrlat l e b Address ei lteeporee Engiseers-Brotber Lodge-Brother of erA j smei th iisaenee 12 doctor t 5 iL d my I r and t healtnyeand ? portn the mnIsn ofthe ltwould one ease h3d in so It in u f co i a GiennTh1is theOUflty conimiesieners 1. which il r for a date of payment and paymenthas the ju as on 1t affairs so very tnse th aItheir tomake thipayment than arof j ImperialChaxnpage WISE ihi until else on SEA SON I J. the greatest the stver Sh yer l 2 LXi. WhilehaIIStAtlanta cust mers site rnon y get it 10. I. iooo. offeredelsewhere I5. OurprIces andovercats tthe W .t our Greatest i1ue1n iooO for legs 1) 15. you ieouM C t LEY itl Stre1 AUasta Ga 1' T I'-'e. * * & . ! . * - - . ¬ ; . . ¬ ¬ . - ¬ . . , . . , , - . . ¬ ' . ¬ ' . ' - , , , . ¬ ¬ . . ¬ , . . - ' / , . ¬ . ' . ¬ ¬ . . . * . ¬ , - . . , . . . ¬ , . . , , ¬ . ¬ . , ¬ . , ( , . ¬ . ¬ . ¬ . ¬ ' . . " " " " ¬ ¬ ' , _ ° ; ' % . * ' . ; ; ; , ; > ; ' - ' . ¬ - ' . , . ¬ , . ¬ . ¬ ¬ . . . - ¬ ' . _ . ' , ¬ . , . . , ¬ . . . . . - . . . : ' ¬ ' - . ¬ . . . * . ' . . . . - ¬ . ¬ ' . , . . . ' . . - . , . , , . . . ¬ . . . , . . ¬ . . , " . , . < . , / . ' . ' ' . ' . - . . . . ' . . . ' . , " , . , - . . . ¬ , , . . , ; ¬ . . , ¬ ' . ¬ ' , . . . - . , ' ¬ . . - . ' , . , ¬ - . ¬ . . , . , . . , - - ¬ . . . . - . . . . . . . , . , . . - . , - . . . - ¬ . ¬ . . . * . * ' ? > - * > . - . . ' . ' . , ¬ . / . * . , . , ' . . ' . . , . ¬ . . , . . . ' . ; . . . * - - . 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