Fort Wayne Daily News from Fort Wayne, Indiana · Page 15Click to view larger version
February 27, 1915

Fort Wayne Daily News from Fort Wayne, Indiana · Page 15

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Fort Wayne Daily News i
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Fort Wayne, Indiana
Issue Date:
Saturday, February 27, 1915
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Page 15
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x pwr f pfW SS Vi ig T fefmt A VVw ji mi' v vjl" feA iry Jk V ji W OTr wr wr Dm AJVD EJVDS FORTHE HOME AJVV TOILET r fx I A REGULAR melange. Isn't ItT l/\ But UltereBtln during the A Lenten days when milady's busy tore It planning for th tomlng spring and' summer. H At the top left li shown a picnic tea e uket equipped with a complete outfit Jor two which to. my mind Is the Ideal Jumber for a plcttlo. There Is an aluminium. teakettle with a standard and an alcohnf burner. There Is a mall bottle. for alcohol at well as a tea canister spoons cups. and saucers In fact everything convenient for the refreshing cup of tea. Nut Is bowl a graceful long stem med champagne glasijuof Venetian ware. Besides being mefutfor what they are Intended such glasses also make de lightful dessert dishes or Ice. cream with fruit juices ir any other fancy dessert with whlch-Jb Careful hoase- wife tops off an exclent IDlIer. The nursery napkins pictured at the lower loft are extremely popular. Thin set Illustrates that old but still popular nursery Jingle. Hey dlddle. the cat aadlhe Addle- The cow does Jier stunt and the doggie laughs. and the eloping plateand spoon are all quite as they were when w grownups were kiddles and reveled In these nursery Jingles lust look at the nifty little bull pup below muztled and harnessed within in Inch of hlaugly JHtle Ute. His har. ness la red patent leather studded with shining gold beaded nails gold mind you no brass tacks on this aristocratic member of dogdom nothing but pure gold and his red nuzzle Is also finished with the same precious metal We span nothing these day. on our pedigreed dogs. At the top tD the nert row la a chic little apron for festive eccaslons say a midnight chafing dish spree in her r om for tha college girl Thisdainty apron la developed In sheerest batiste Inset with val Insertion and edged with vaL A natty little bow of ribbon co- quettlshly ornaments one corner and long hemmed strings tie In tile back. At the bottom of the Illustration Is another chafing dish apron shuffled down there for the convenience of the artist I suppose. This apron Is of tine lawn with a border of embroidered lawn. In the very center of the Illustration. 1/1 the place of honor as It were Is a sewing basket equipped with all the appurtenance for sewing. Everything that milady needs or sewing darning or embroidery Work I packed' In till. basket Flanking the basket are a pair of crocheted bedroom sandals. They are made of roe silk and are embroidered with tiny rosebuds. Crocheted straps T- of silk encircle tit Allies to button at the sides. At th lower left jkt left sandal Is shown a pretty shoe IT- It Is made of wood and sleeV PDO aatin ribbon is blrred over th fttespart while the wooden part that shoves down Into th ho vamp Is covert 9with Mack velvet. The companion to It Is shown at the top of the Illustration Two wrist watcheH with their respective settlngi of leather are shown next. These watches are the most popular of any f the seasons bijouterie At tbe upper right hand are two' wineglasses fixed In the iray of glass holders clamped to tlie sides of the tray. These holders are novelties andv jJiR are meant to Veep glasses from sliding on the tray. The torpedo shaped ladles' bag below la of black leather lined with white kid and fitted with accessories. The lavender bag la road of lavender silk ot delicate shadeTand' Is embroidered With lavender flosi of a deeper shade. It Is filled with lavender and Is. splendid JMJ addition to milady dresser drawer. j xut to fit HAVE THIS FOR YOUR HOMEMAKING CODE. pO regard homemlllfln a a business and apply to It science culture and effort. To follow the new rather than the old the national rather than kitchen housekeeping. To be an active member of a homemakers' organization. To Inform yourself on food values economical marketing and wholesome cooking that your family may enjoy abounding health. To work for legal measures Insuring purity. honesty and sanitation In the manufacture and sale of all home products. To. study literature giving the newest thought Ideal and help on home prob. lems. This Is the code given by Mrs. Christine 1tederlck In th American Club Women. funny 6aeter favors T BNTEN ttroe rarnlnds us that Easter will soon be with us an this time or voluntary penance will rfjake the dawning Of Easter all th brighter. II- luitrated Is grotesque little favor for th Easter dinner table. Two quaintly garbed bunnies ar vjdntly having a tug f war over a jiall 6f arilcloqs. bon bon Wny Xheyih nld4io Uhd upon a strstclied accordion I not clear. JPtrhaj bunnies rlkt music. 71 During Lent Consider the Omelet IN making an omelet th pan should pinch of salt three teaapoonfuls of be dry. rery hot and smooth. In. making addition to th plain oraeUt th filling should be folded la lust Defore It 1 really to serve. Plain French Omel t Melt a tablespoonfnl of butter In the omelet pan. Beat three U and add a small saltspoonful of salt and llttte pepper. Hare butter hot and pour In eggs shaking the pan constantly. Make holes In the top of tile mixture se that tbe beat can penetrate and cook It evenly. W\lle It Is still soft roll ever with a Iknlfe iet It remain a mo. ment to brown and serve Immediately. Chicken Omsltl Chop one cup of chicken. Make a white sauce of one cnp of milk one tablespoonful of butter and on tab- spoonful of dour. Add th chicken t the white cauce. Make a plain omelet cook and told In th creamed chicken and told over omelet Lentsn OmIt One-half cup of milk and one tablespoonful of butter brought to the scalding point Add. one cup of any kind of-flaked ash. ptpper and salt to taste. Make a plain omelet and spread on the fish Just before the omelet Is folded and serve Immediately Cocoa Omllet. To the well beaten yolks of live eggs add three tablespoonfuls of milk a cocoa and two tablespoonful of sugar Beat whites ot Jlv. egg to a stiff froth and fold Into the omelet mixture. Cook until set In th omelet pan brow. fat th oven and serve Immediately. Chits OmIt This Is a delightful breakfast dish but It must be served Immediately after being cooked. Beat three eggs ddlng salt and pepper two teaspoon- tuts of minced parsley two tablespoon full of grated cheese. Mix well pour Into omelet pan In which lIat been melted one tablespoonful of butler and cook In the usual way. Spanish Omtlet Chop one tomato a green pepper small onion stick of celery two sprig of parsley and two mushrooms 81m- mr over th lire tor two minutes. Beat six n put In mlet pan with one tbponM of welted trotter. Coot slightly add th tkoppe vegetables and fold over In the. usual manner. Omelet With Mushrooms. Lake a plain mlet In the usual way and Just before folding It spread over It the following mixture To one cupful of mushrooms cut fine add one tablespoonful of butter and one-half cupful of milk. seasoning with salt and pepper. Make a thick sauce by adding one tablesponful of flour boll ten .In- utes. Pour over omelet fold and brown In oven. EXIT THE LARGE KITCHEN T ROE kitchens are no longer In fa or the smaller and more compact the better. provided the necessary articles are placed conveniently and there Is room for managing a large dinner party with ease. No. matter If no serv ants ore kept and on has very little company sooner or later there comes II luch accommodations are Plenty of light Is essential jL UA fof w it Mi MJro j ire. ft i j in i i v time when necessary. by day and by night. and there should be a fixture on the sink for dishwashing one to throw a direct light on the stove and. If possible. one In' the center of the room for general use. The sink and stove light may be turned on and oft as required. This of course. Is where electricity I used. Walls should be covered with a material that permits of washing or by three or four coats or cream on pal yellow paint The woodwork nay be ll' T White enameled paint or a varnish fin ish either allows leanings with water. A floor covered with a good grade of linoleum Is a paying Investment. for. with proper care It will last for years. It does not pay to buy oilcloth or a cheap grade of linoleum One that Is Inlaid with a small. ell covered pat. tern. Is besti What Is called granite the design or rather lack of design makes a flrre floor Wears well and Is not so expensive as the linoleum with the block figures. Tills was learned purely by accident The granite comes In brown and green finish Correct placing of tbe sink adds greatly to ones comfort Have It Just the right height with a window over It If possible A medium priced srrlm makes the best curtain to. kitchen use as It weirs and washesj well. Buy' th ecru Instead of pure whUv' ft JJKIW j FOR LENTEN MEDITATION FROM Parti Domes the statement that a great many of ths tailor gown are to b shown thli spring and to a gnat extent they will b used on th street In place of th cot suits. Undoubtedly that statement and that condition. It they prove to exist are due to the absence of many men tailors and for the consequent necessity to depend upon woman's work. It Is prob. able that w will have th gowns and also th suit and slnoe th tailored gowns for street wear are satisfactory with Shoulder wraps they wm be ac. ceptable as they always are In th spring. The bolero gown or th gown tllat Is mad. with a like bodice opened over a walstceat or blouse front Is exceedingly attractive and Is being net with a ready weleein and Is so generally becoming that It wm undoubtedly take a definite place. For dinner and or evsnlng wear and for th dances that occur. at all heurf th skirts are wider and swinging and the high moderately high or genulne empire lines are the preferred ones but there la almeet Infinite variety to b found In the way these features are treated. A very lovely evening gown designed for a debutant I mad. with a straight full skirt of gold net tbat Is richly embroidered with gold threads to form a deep border. At th edge of this skirt la a blue ribbon band the bqdlce consists of a tiny little bolero of blue satin over a blouse of soft ream net with very short draped sleeves There la a wide girdle of th blue. with a single beautiful pink rose placed to the left of the front Within doors we are to see a great drnl of gold and sliver both In the form of brocades In such lace as the one already mentioned and In the form of braid making applied trimming. A most attractive gown available for many occasions and one that Is fairly typical. Is of light blue poplin combined with a peach pink chiffon and sliver lace. The circular skirt la of the poplin and Is open at the front to reveal a panel of the chiffon veiled with silver lace and the edges of the panel are finished with silver braid. Tho bodice of blue' chiffon la finished with a low. round neck' and with a tiny little sleeveless Jacket of the poplin. Around the armholes there Is I folded band lit th pink satin and on the left ld Is . bunch of lower. TTTti Sixteen Sichroom Don'ts A NT woman cari do a certain kind of nursing at a time when It Is Im possible to have a trained none or when a trained nurse Is not necessary. Some practical suggestions called Sickroom Don'ts are/ liven by Mary P. Scott In the. last number of the Nurse to make the nursing easier and better Don't allow th sheet to become wrinkled. Don't Jar th bell by leaning or sitting upon It iu NIFTY SPORTS COAT ILLUSTRATED t a very smart regt Ian sports coat In th old fashioned pepper and salt woolen material. It Is loose and" roomy 4 lultthjo for mo. tortn or any other outdoor' sport. Black velvet buttons form a SHllable trimming Don't allow stale flowers to remain 111 the room. Don't appear anxious. People who are III are very sensitive Don't rattle papers Nothing gets on a patients nerves more than this Don't have a carpet In the sickroom It It can be avoided. Use matting Instead. It may be kept clean by throw- In damp tea leave. over a part of th room at a time and quietly broablnl l them up with a hand broom. Don't shot out light from the sick- s' room when the patient Is able to tiller- ate It. Mak. the sickroom the most- cheerful and best ventilated room In the house. Don't let bad air remain In the sick- room. Purt idr Is Imperative Avoid air from th kitchen or clothes closets. Outside air Is beat but when cool there should be a lr. In the room to take off the chill. V Don't neglect a screen to shad th A light irom th yes of the patient Don't forget a nursery lamp to hat water. beef tea etc. Don't neglect the means to tempt an Invalids appetite. Dainty service and delicate china will often do this Don't forget to vary the Masoning of food according to the condition of tUe patient Don't live tbe patient toast that ha not been put In the open oven first and their toasted. It Improves the taste and digestibility. Don't let the patient suffer for a cool. lag drink when one can be given safely. This Is a rood way to make one Pour one cupful of bran Into water and bolt It ono hour strain and add sugar and l mon Julie. It Is good for tbe patient' and leaves a pleasant taste In th mouth. Don't always bring flowers to In vallds. Try daintily prepared edible. You will be repaid when you see how pleased the nick persons will be. Nour. ishing broths nnd soups wine Miles crnamed hlcken or creamed o sters In' a delicately tinted bowl will bring Joy ! to their hearts and comfort to their Btomachi j Dun t open the window at the bottom only. Open at the top too. it fc t 4 M1 \ fr ONE THOUGHT OUT OF THE PAT. T SKEK no thorns and 1 ctc4lf th1 A smalljpy It th door U low I stoop down If I can remove the ston V out of my way I do o It H br UB" heavjr 1 ge round It. And tlHWfVtryT U dajr I find jometlUng which gladden J me. Goethe. f f yM VWf f J VMU VtEftjgfeft for WK fcj Ur ftjhftH fr WWfatoSffa t tUfrf V V 1M VHV M i wl M r 11 1 A It T i4I B t' InterestinK bralt the Bummer. I I t J. own Jor td l al ohor II. llIa t a. lntact. Irrac tullonl cl 811 of I g etut r tb 1. ch I de. IIghtfuldeaaert an fanc whlch. b. exc lent napklnSIl tured H d bIIddle th d gle and' plat& and sp On we attb. pUtyIItUe belo-.ouzeldal d har lued In ti j"lIglll. tt1. I J l. 1at. for II lll ala. tin Ii ll e8 the f1a prellytth l 1IiJpoopltn tJMteMP8Jt. I thov tI14 IhOi 1aclnalt. ia ream ron bat lite old arl tocratlc doc om and sp. n n pJa ped THISfORYOUR T u ra ther acUvemember econo lcal tnay alloundl l' ure givi n the ANT calida ul18 llonl Dontl1. II I t' lb. the byleanlnC 110. 11011' re ver p per. 1 IIYeUnOCe tb. ble tl ate I volll t cool. rl 1 i1 t ili Icreen the I iBiII l hUrom the tIJ l f JIea. 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