The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 1 Click to view larger version
August 5, 1896

The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 1

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The Atlanta Constitution i
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Atlanta, Georgia
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Wednesday, August 5, 1896
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PARR WAS TO BLAME EYldencs Pots the Accident on. the Dud. Engineer. INQUEST WILL BE A LONG ONE Atlantic City's Horrible Collision Will Be Made Clear. CORONER U1AU6HLIN SEARCHING CLOSELY Railroad Officials Are Watching the Developments Keenly Jury Composed of Intelligent Men. Atlantic City V J August 4 The In. quest by Coroner McLaughlin into the deaths resulting from the collision between the Reading railroad express and the Hrldeton excurs on tr iin on the West Jersey railroad on the meadows last Thursday evening began yesterday. The greater part of the testimony heard was In explanation of the workings of the block signal system. Coroner McLaughlin Is be ng assisted In conducting the inquest b Prosecutor Pleas Perry. who has undertaken the task of questioning the witnesses. Both the railroad cosnpancs are repre er ed by counsel at the hearing. and United States Senator Sew all v ce president of the West Jersey railroad and George W d assistant general pas ei g r agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company came here from Cape Mc in a special tra n to listen to the evidence. Besides. both companies have stenographers taking the testimony with an t e tar use in probable damage suits. Superintendent Da ton of the West Jer- sey. who was absent from Atlantic City at the. time of the accident presented in an able way for the benefit of the jurY the nerfpctinns of the Mock s stem us a safe- f guard against coil sions but was forced 1 to admit that Its i erfcU working depends upon infallible human hem- Superintendent Pie e of the Reading appeared ai thing hut a happy witness. and staved off answering embarrassing que tions as long ns he could and then tinalty admitted that express trains ire run at nearly full steed ii approaching a grade cross ng if the are onto tiv it the sgnal to go ahead. the rules of the contpany expl citlj state that trains appio i hing a crossing shall he under such control that they can stop with n 1 feet of such .rowing It would seem that the rule Is not strictly observed in the 1 erce competition for business. Nicholas 1 ong day operator at the tow- er at the cross rg witnessed l the aitident as he was on h s v\ i\ home from work. He stated that the clear signal was given to the excursion tra n and the danger s sgnal set for the express. hut gay It as his opinion that this as unusual as express trains on the Reading ire usuall given the right of wa\ over all tra ns on the Test Jersey owng to priority of track occupations. U Is probable that the inquest wilt last until edne da and ma even continue over tm Thursday. All the victims of the wreck in the sanl- tarturn are doing well. and there. are now hopes that all ma lit matel recover. Interest In the case row centers in the inquest. The jur is composed of reprp- sensitive business men of the c t and is made up as folows Foreman Charles Evans president of the Atlantic City National bark ex Count Clerk Lew Is Evans x Levi Atbertson C. E. Vdams grocer Thomas J Dickerson merchant and City Hill Commhs oner John B npior Afternoon Session of the Jury. The testiniuny 1 rou ht out toda seems to fix the d rect rtsponsibilit for the accident upon the deal engineer of the Read. Irt railroad express. Ldward Farr. From the testimony Farr s action in running at a speed of fort fl mitts an hour i ast a danger signal seems nexpllcable and as the man is dead the reason for it wilt probably never be known. Farr is given the reputation of having been an experienced engineer and a man of except onally high moral cnaracter and not of a reckless or careless disposition. Only two weeks previous to thn accident his train was signaled to stop at th s very crossing and he prompt brought his train under control. One witness today testified-Conductor Pinkerton. or the express that Farr saw the signal set at the crossing for he heard him g ve the signal in reply to notify the towerman that he had the signal a blast of his whistle Conductor Pnkerton intimate rather than charged that the stg- n il was suddenly changed on Farr as he heard the whstle blow furiously in a moment again for v I at he took to be another signal blast. Stilt this witness was forced to admit that when he looked from the platform of the tar the Danger signal was set and this post on or the stnutphore was corroborated b every other witness It wai shown that rr m ide ever effort to stop his train i T hen he saw the coming collison and s ICC H lid in reducing Its speed from fortj live miles an hour to fifteen in a few hundred feet. lie ml ht have jumped after putting on the air brakes and reversing his engine hut lie died with his hand on the lever of his engine. Tower Operator George F. Ilauser who set the signals told a straIghtforward story as to the positions of the semaphore and declared that he did not move the signals on the Reading line from where they were set when he entered the tower which was at danger but only moved those on the West Jersey road to a clear track. Withesses testified that it la usual to give a first class expross right of wu on railroads over excursion trains. and that Itau- ser did an unusual thing in giving the latter the right of wa Sf111 as the danger sign&l was set for him. I arr should have stopped even if it was usual- for his train to get the tight of wa Fireman Ilollahab of the express testified that he d d not see the signals until the train was within twent five fe t of the d slant signal and it was then set at danger. lie knew nothing of Farr's s action as he could not see him from his side of the cab across the top of the boiler and saved his own life by runn ng back to the tender. EnKln. r Crelner of the excursion tra n testined that he sot a dear signal and went over the trucks at the crossing at toe rate of thirty miles an tour. He did not notice the express particularly until it was- nearly on top of his train as he was at- ttrUvely watching for his signals and sup- Posed the express would top at the danger " nl The inquest will probably not le con uded M in Uiursoay MICHIGAN MINERS MAY STJFFEB Nearly Eight Thousand Men Thrown Out of Work. Bessemer. Mich. August 4 The Tilden mine en Saturday closed down both lay an night shfts of No. 9 shaft. This completes the shutdown of the Rockefeller m nes In this cltj. Nos. 6 7 8 9 and 10 shafts now employ Just enough men to keep the mine clear of water. In a large number of mines the pumps have neen j taken out and the mines allowed to fill with water. Gogebic range mutes are practically all shut down at Hurley. Ironwood. Bessemer and Wakefield. There are less than luOO men at work on the ran e where' at one time there were over sWX men employed It Is certain that a tew months of Idle- ness will find hundreds of famUlrs In destitution The several mining companies have allowed their fmployes all un occupied lands for use at Pingree farms. but the army worms have destroyed the last hope of the nlner of having at least vegetable to keep body and saul togetner coming winter. y i v- FIRST GUN IS FIRED. Continued From First Page. this my heart U too full to need any writ' ten words by which to address you but 1 like to keep my figures before toe so as to be sure that I am right. for tear that my young newspaper friends who are sItting by rue may catch me tripping" Then raising nil hand impressively. he continued. My countrymen the crisis has come and the Issue has been Joined. It is no longer a question of party name. It is not a time when a man votes a ticket be- cause it has a party name written en It It is the battle royal between the sold stand- ard and the double standard. V.'e have been sailing under the gold standard until the people are ready to call a halt. But before passing to the discussion of national i tics I want you to bear with me while I speaK to you of the affairs of our own well-loved commonwealth of Georgia. of which you and I and all of us are so justly proud. I want to talk to you on some natters which are of Interest to you as Georgians and as Americans the responsibility which rests on the' American citizen. The American republic took the lead in the transfer of power from' the few to the man the transfer of the power from the aristocrat and the monarch to the people. Ths doctrine. which was first planted up- on American soil. has spread Its branches until now its influence is felt wherever the free winds of freedom blow over the whole wide world We want no discussion with those who put partisanship above patrlotsm and self before humanity. We are work- lug for the fate of mankind. We are Inter- ested in the government or this great na- tlon but more than all. e Georg ans are interested In Georga. a and In th govern mett of the state of Georgia. What Democratic Georgia Will Mean. The interests of Georgia come home to us. Her officers deal directly Ith you. cu may talk about presidents. yOU may talk about cabinet officers and about fed- eral judges. and yet at las you must teal. ze that when ou leave out the postmas- ers it Is only occasionally that you have come In contact with a federal officer I say this because I take it for blan ed that there are no moorshiners In Cobb county that have been caught. The moonshn come in contact with federal officers ver often. Laughter. The federal officer rarely come In contact with the citizen of Georgia. It reminds me of an old fellow 0 whom they came when the were try- ng to abolish the county court lie ta d 1 don t care anv thing about the county ourt It is the e durred Ittle justice courts that are bother ng me. Laughter This od farmer was interested in the things that came home to him and it is this very Idea that I want to impress upon ou the tact that the Important th ng for ou to cons der is your home government. our state government. Now what is the truth' Nothing is worth knowing in this world but the truth. The democratic party Is in control of your state government What reason ib there why you should wish a change' There was no prosperity In Georgia until the democratic party took control cf the state government and guaranteed to every citizen his rights under th" laws of the land. They appeal to the colored rran o help them change our state admlnistra ion What has he to gain' The great est object that you colored men can am at Is the fducat on of your children. When he democratic party got control of the government of Georgia the school fund or both white and black amounted to only li4OtO. That was In 1S7l. Today we spend 1100000 directly and over JoOOOOO as a local public school tax. Frcm 5171 OOJ per j ar we have come to. the magnificent um of 1 lGOltOO to educate the children of Gerg a both white and black. Democracy anti Prosperity. The re v as no roslerlty in GeorgIa until the democrats took control. Tron- that time on the wheels of prosper t moved swiftly on. Industry and thrift walked hand in hand and I want to show you just a few figures to prove what effect the democratic rule In our state has had and what is true of Georgia is true of all the southern s' tes V hen we democrats once more assumed co itrol after the war the state of Georgia and the whole south were In povertj and ashes. Now listen to what has been accompl hhed under d democratic admlnlstraton. on In IvxO the south had 4000000 invested In manufactories In isle we had-- KWXW ncary three times as much a id all other th ngs are in like proportion. Two years. ago the people of Georgia called me to the guberna or al chair as governor of t eir state. During the tints that I have acted In that capacity I have earnestly and cc isclentiouslj striven to do my full duty. and for what I have done I claim no credit Indiv duallj What I have done I lave been enabled to do be- cause the democratic party elected me and because It has sustained ire in e\ .r\ effort that I have made to do jJs Uce to my cotjntrjmen Whatever credit at taches to my administration is not due to me but it is due to the party. Governor Atkinson then a luded to the rn thod in which the money of the state had forrr vlj been deposited In the bark- and showed that in the past two years he had saved the state thousands 01 dollars by requiring the banks with whom the state s money had been deposited to pay interest on it thereby reducing the taxes of the state many thousand dollars- 115000 a year. And yet he continued I see where a man said the other day On he loaned the money to the banks for 2 per cent. when the people who borrow money are paj ing U' And yet j ou men who deposit money In the. banks don't get a cent for it. except with tare exceptions The banks take your money. They keep It safely for you. But they don t pay you a cent of Interest. And yet I have got from them a rate of Interest for the money of the state which you men as private citizens cannot get for your money. The governor then went on to show how by the confiscation of the Northeastern railroad on account of the defalcation In the paj ment of interest of bonds indorsed by the state and by its subsequent lease. thousands of dollars had been added to the state treasury. In reference to the interest charged for the use of the states s money. deposited in banks. he showed that had the policy which he had Inaugurated been in effect since the war. the state would be 5100000 better off than. it now Is. And yet he continued there are some of these fellows who want to beat me for governor At this point he was interrupted by loud cheering and shouts They cant do it' They rant do It' A Telegram from Alabama. Before the cheering hail ceased d. West ern Union messenger boy. pushed to the front of the crowd in front of the governor and handed him' a telegram. Tear. lug open the envelope. he stretched out his arm and commanded silence. Georgians he said i have a message for you from your great sister empire state of Alabama. There was a set. of fellows over there who said that they would beat Joe Johnston as there are some in Georgia who said that they would beat me. They got up a tUson party manipulated by the republicans and they tried to fuse our populist rends. nut I see from this message that our populist fellow countrymen were too smart to be fooled far their fusion talk. Here is the answer whlchAlabami has glvento their false doctrine Cries of Give us thinews Read Itt Read ttr' Interrupted the governor Yes I will read it Here it the reply. which Alabama sends to those who doubt th Integrity of the white men of the south Reports received indicate that Alabama has given the democratic nominee a majority of forty thousand. end that both houses of the legislature wU be democratic by two-thirds majority. This announcement was followed by prolonged applause. Convict Lease Question. Since I have been chief executive of this commonwealth I have ha l u deal with the convict lease queston I say it with a blush that the present management of our con\ lets Is a blot on the fair escutcheon of our state. Since I have been In power. I have done all that I could to see that the condition- or these unfortunate criminal be alleviated. I believe U heu a man has Ltoken the liws of a state he should be punished but In punlshJng offender s we should not forget that ho Is still a human being. No man should be allowed to lay th stripe upon ho back of-a convict except the legally authorized oHccr of thj state. end such Inspection should be systematically made as to insure tha fau that ho Is taken such care of as becomes a Cl rlhtian land. The convict la s as they now stand. will be executed. But 1 put myself on record now. that when n xt year these convict leases expire. and the time comes to snake a new law as to the employment of he state s criminals. It the legislature should pass another law which Authorizes the lease of the prisoners to private parties. I w 11 veto It so Welp me God Loud applause. The governor then referred In stirring terms to the county chalngang system showing by Uustrati of Incidents the horrible practices employed In some of these camps end urging. the necessity of putting the county crmlnl under state sipervlslon with a law giving the governor authority to have them Inspected n stemat- kallj and giving him such control of them as to enable him o correct any abuses that might be practiced. He also announced his bel ef that such counties and districts as ceslred to employ their criminals on their public roads. should be allowed to do so. Discusses National Politics. Having announced the democratic platform so far as state affairs go the governor entered. into a discussion of the national platform. He made an earnest and logical argument in favor of bimetallism as epposed to the s sngle gold standard. lie was frequently int rrupted by questions from populists In the crowd o tell of whom he replied with an apt and ready wit which atonce confuted his opponents. Negroes in the Crowd. The negroes had lined themselves up on one side of the platform. and were among the nost earnest and Interested 1 listeners In the crowd. Governor Atkinson's s determined stand on the lynching question has made nm thousands of friends among the colored en and when he came to that question n the course of his remarks the negroes became all attention. When he advised them to stand 1) the respectable vvilit' men' who were their friends when no politics was stirring the signified their approval by sundry grunts and corner exclamation1- ifn he referred to tile way n which their children hail been given the benefit of the pubic school sstem' they were loud in th ir apnlaioe rnallj after telling them of his etlorH to supi ress lynch aw and his determnation to give the law a speedy and d rect course in such casts. without delay or pardon they broke out in exclamations of delight and for the time being the most enthusiastic supporters that the governor had In the audience w re the three hundred black men. The governor concluded his' speech with an eloquent peroration urging the erring populists to c me had into the ranks and stand shoulder to shoulder with the democrats i i their efforts to redeem the country rom the toils which the nor j power was winding about It lien he concluIaj the applause amounted to tin ovation and the campaign of was launched on the crest cf a tual wave of tnthuasm in Id Cobb county one of the rock r bbed strongholds of democracy GARRErrS WILL MADE PUBLIC Baltimore's Rich Man Left Two Instruments Behind Him. Baltlrnote Md vugust 4 The- wills of he late Robert Garrett were made tubllc tonight and both instruments i be prorated at Tow son tomorrow. One of the documents was executed In Baltimore In tStI. and makes his wife substantially his sole devisee and legatee. The other Trill was drawn in London in 1& S just after the death of his brother T Harrison Garrett This document tequeahes 1100000 to each of tie three eons of. hs brother T Harrison Garrett $ OOOO to his law. Vitliam T Ircl JWOOO to Charles Nit- see the manager of the banking hruse of lobert Garrett Sons. and J2H 000 to A. B. Crane. for many years the private secre- ar of tic. Garrett All the rest and res- due of tie estate is gven to his wife Mary Garrett absolute Mrs Garrett and her father. are named as exec itors 0 serve without hood BANKERS HAVE BEEN INDICTED. Newport Pa. Deposit Bank Charged with Fraudulent Work. Newport Pa August 4 The grand Jury today found Indictments against Thontas 1 Millsai president. J H. Irving cash- cr. and Henry B BrechtsI Dr. AVI11 am R Clsna Dr. Henry O Orrts Silas Wright and Charles Troutrnan redors of the defunct Newport Deposit bank. They are charged with embezzlement in laving received deposits when they knew the bank was insolvent. By agreement of counsel the defendants will not be brought to trial until the November term of court. Tfiey are at present under bond. IOWA GOLD DEMOCRATS MEET. Delegates May Be Elected to Indianapolis No State Ticket DesMoines. la August 4 Colonel L M Mart n of Marshalltown called the gold democrats conference to order at 2 o'clock this afternoon There were seventy-five democrats present It Is expected that delegates to the Indianapolis convention will be selected but there Is considerable opposition to putting a state ticket n the field. SHOUT POLITICAL SHOTS. Des Moines la. August 1 About two hundred democrats of Iowa met here today and formally registered their protest against the platform and candidates' of the Chicago convention Judge John. Claggett of Mason City was named as chairman. Butie Mont. August 4. On Invitation of Senator Lee Mantle chairman' of the state republican central commttee representative members of the party to' the number of several hundred. were in secret conference all day and. late. Into the night discussing the political situation and the advisability of putting McKinley electors into the field this fall. New Orleans La August 4. Special The popul et state convent on of Louisiana met at Alexandria today seventeen parishes being represented The committee on resolutions was out several hours but was unable to agree and two reports were presented The majority report was signed by seven members who strongly arraigned and denounced the democrat c party state and national. Richmond Ya. August 4 The n w state democratic committee met In this city tonight lion. Taylor Ellison was elected state chairman. Saginaw. M oh August 4 The democrat c stato central committee met here this afternoon Chairman Elliott G. Ste. venson' s restgnatlon Ion was accepted. Fred A. Baker. of Detroit a silver leader was then elected cha rman. Grand Rapids. Mich August t A largely attended conference of free sliver democrats from all parts of Michigan was held here today. Hon. Thomas A. Wilson of Jackson. was elected s national committeeman and twenty prominent democrats front different cites were chosen as advisory delegates to go to Indianapolis with the committeeman. llARKET Diamond Mitch Failure Oiiiiorallud tits IailcIaI World. NEW YORK TOOK IT TO. HEART Chicago Stock Exchange Will Bernaln Closed Awhile. WINDY CITY TAKES A HOPEFUL VIEW Neither the Diamond Match Nor BU- cult Company Euined Proprie tots Only Hurt. Chicago August 4. It U not at the present possible to make any estimate of how large the figure or what Its ramifications may be. The Moores have unqueatronatly purchased an enormous line of both New York Biscuit and Diamond Match stcck The high price at which Diamond Match has been selling makes 4the sum Involved in handling it extremely large. The capital stock of the Dlamcnd Match Company is 11000000 and of the New York Biscuit Corn- psny 9000 and It is estimated that the Moores have purchased half the capital stock of the Diamond Match Company. and. their pur- j of New York Biscuit stock perhaps bears as large a proportion to the total. William H Moore. senior member of the firm. Is at present In the east. James H. More. who has been the immediate active manager r of the speculative campaign is in Chicago but last night declared that he was not yet In position to make any state- meat as tp the amount Involved. William II. Moore is the first vice president of the Diamond Match Company and president of the Ne York Biscuit Company. James H Moore is second vice president or both. The failure had a demoralizing effect on stock prices In New York at the opening today. Enormous amounts of leading is sues were thrown on the market and prices dropped I per cent or so- between sales The loss during the first ten minutes of business rouged from 1 to 3's per cent western stacks like Burlington and Quln- cr Northwest and St. Paul being the greatest sufferers Chicago stock exchange adjourned at 10 0 dock this morning for an Indefinite pe nod. This action was decided upon at a meet- Ing held last night. at which were representative bank presidents. members of sto tk exchange committee and a number of prominent capltalhts This meeltng was assembled informally after the announcement which was made late in the afternoon by Mr. Jim's 11 Moore that margin calls could be no long- en met. The governing committee of the stock ex change held a second meeting this afternoon but accomplished nothing. The committee adjourned until tomorrow at noon to await the statement promised by J II Moore as to the finances of Moore brothers and their dealings in Diamond Match and New York. Bscuit stock. It was decided that It would not do to re- ope5 the exchange until the Moore tangle Is sttolghtened out. Offers wiremade around town during the afternoon tbr batches of Diamond Match stock all the way from its to itt but nobody seemed to care to sell Talk from P. D. Armour. P. D. Armour. who Is supposed to be one of the heaviest holders of Diamond Match. stock took a hopeful view of the siiuat on whtn seer today. lie did not think thtt the failure of Moore Brothers would affect any other secur ties than Diamond Match and New York Biscuit and over these he does not expect any panic. Mr. Arnicur said All the banks have agreed to make no calls on H L sto. unt 1 arrai gcments tan be made and the private individuals who hold stock are all rich men and able to carry It and so I see no cause for apprehension The Moore brothers are or rrridle age anl law j era by profession. Their business life has been' passed In Chicago. Their first important venture In the co operation field was the organization of the lracer Axle Greasa Company. which was a great success and which gave them a strong backing of rich men. Then the organized the Great Diamond Match Company which nas also been remarkably successful The New Yolk Biscuit Company and the Amen- can S raw Board Company were organized by them also. The Moores lost their hold on the last named company two years ago when the stockholders revolted against the r management The Moores were believed to be very rich up to the time of their failure. Their failure is believed to be entirely a personal one and members of the Chicago stock exchange advance the opinion that the shares of Diamond Mitch and New ark Biscuit stock will not be materially affected by It as both concerns are known to be In first-class condition V. V. Baker of A O Slaughter. Co. states that Diamond Match is earning between 18 and 20 per cent and paj ing lit whilst New York Biscuit pays fraud earns considerably more. Mr. J J Mitchell president of the Illinois Trust and Savings bank says that there is 1 ttle doubt that a pool will be formed to take care or the Diamond Match stock. To Syndicate the Stock. It Is ed that an effort will he made to syndicate the Diamond Match stock now out at 170. If such action Is taken the danger of possible failures resulting from the collapse of Moore Bros. will be very much lessened. Chicago banks and bankers. who hold approximately 4 000 000 worth of Diamond Match stock as collateral for money loaned will not press the borrowers for a settlement. At the big stock brokers' offices there w as a general feeling of uneasiness r e b g failure having stunned and surprised Overybody No business was being iise in local securities. Among the brokers there was only approval of the course of the exchange officials in closing the insttuuon temporarily TOE BRYAN'S NOTIFICATION. Treasurer St. John Is Perfecting Arrangements for the Event. New' York. August 4 Treasurer Willam C. St. John. of the democratic national committee and the national sliver party was early on hand this morning at h a headquarters at. the Hotel Bartholell. There was quite a crowd of people await ing to get an audience with Mr. St. John and he was kept busy answering questions of all kinds. Mr. St. John when seen said that the names of the speakers at the notification meeting at Macison Square Garden lia4 not yet been selected and would not be for a few days' more. The advance arrangements for the' big meeting are however being mapped out. There will Le no tickets of admission necessary to get into the garden but all the seats wilt be re served. There are 6660 regular seats In the garden and in addition to these there will be sru chairs placed in the body of the garden. These' seats and chairs will be re sprveduntli 7:45 o'clock in the evening. There will be SOOseats reserved for the- press The platform will to reserved for the committee and. the Invited guests. Mint Tu Long Shots Male zany Lucky Buyers Wealthy. BOOKIES WERE HIT HARD Millican a Five Hundred to One Has Soft Thing of It. A VERY GOOD TtR' Favorites Had a' Poor Day on the Track Two Ten-Inning Games of Baseball. Detroit Mlch August The summer meeting of the Detroit Jockey Club opened at the Grosse Point track this afternoon. The weather was hot and the track fairly fast. A starting machine was used and worked well Only two favorites won. outsiders wlnnlug In tour events. Nearly ten thousand persons were present when the event of the day the interila- tlonal derby a sweepstakes for year olds. worth' 5000 was run. It was won by Damien a rank outsider and a to shot. Rarniero by Fonzo was a hot favorite and Lady Inez was second choice at I to. 1 The field got away promptly with Nimrod. Ramlero and Damien In front. Mermaid cut out the pace. however and was a length and a halt ahead at the first quar- ter maintaining her advantage until nearly halt the distance was- covered. when she dropped back beaten. Ramlero and Argentina then went. to the front the former being three-quarters of a length ahead of Argentina when the three-quarters was passed. Argentina had her head- In front of Ramtero at the mile their positions being reversed at the mile and a quarter. Turning Into the stretch Damien who had. been' trailing the leaders. began to come fast and had his field beaten a furlong flom home. winning by two lengths from Nimrod who was a head in front of Ar- guitita a head in front of the favorite. lady Inez was never in the race. Frat race. one Prestcn n Martin 9 to 5 won. Joe Clark second Eguart third. Time 1 41 Second race six furlongs Jennie June. Ice. Sherland 7 to I won Miss rtowett second Necedah third Time. 1 115 Tiiin1. rare five furlongs Indo US. rig gott. 7 to 1. won Sutton second Liernadihlo third. Time. 1 01 Fourth race international derby. cne and a halt miles-Damien 112 R Williams IS to I won Ntmrod second Argentina third. Time 2:16k. Fifth race seven furlongs 8rvice 150. II. Shields 6 to I won Elano second. Little Tom third. Time. 1 2S4 Sixth race six furlongs 109. 11. Lewis 7 to 6 won. oylan second Irene W cods third. Time i:14'4. Entries at Detroit First race. one mile Mar 93. Belle Boyd. 96 Ros nrara Toots Pinch- ltik 100 Penurj. 101 Lady Rose. Outgo LaSalle. 103. Fred ham. 106 Imp Wooisey 107 AU Over. 110. Strathreel. 112 Second race five-eighths of a mile Rideau Panbuekie. Sistp AdePt Talnca 9 Rockwood 101. John' Sullivan 102 Thomp- son. What Next. 103. Watchens 104 Third race. mile and seventy yards- Downing. 94 Sam Tate. 97 Beau Ideal 98 Sykeston 106 All Over. Connoisseur Lobengula 107. gbart 159. Fourth race sixteenths of a mile Lou Lou R Miss Moter Kate Havln Tr muta Ante Duncan. Island Queen. lone K. Lady Hope. Ev aline. Sister Clara. Susie Hawza Filly 105 Minnesela 107. Maraqinta. Barometer. Bramblenet Sankara Fldlnee Altaneva. 110. Fifth race. two miles and a halt steenle- Maid of Ellershle. 133 Bob Heeley 120 S las Pickering 140 Imp Ruthven ill Tuscarora Sewanee. 1 St. Brottdon. 161 Pat Oakley. 144. Sixth race. five-eighths of a mile Oloso 100 Lexington Pirate. 101. Holy Terror. 102 Collateral. 104 Scarborough Stentor. lol Ethel Lee. 100. Scribe. Robalr. 107. Seven Races at Brighton. Brighten Beach. August 4 The principal events run for and decided here today were the Wave Crest stakes and the Distaff stakes Refugee a to chance capture 1 the former event. Cleopus. the second choice for the Distaff stakes won by a length and a halt. irst race. five furlongs Karma. 100 Clayton. to 2 won Dargrette second U ght Roj ol third. Time 1 02V Second race rive furlongs Suisun. 100 Gardiner. 2 to won Tempestuous second. Successful third. Time. 1 02 Third race ore and sixteenth miles- Sir Francis. 108. Loggeit. 1 to 2 won Chug- nut second Pearl Son third. Time 1 4SV Fourth race the Wave Crest stakes. six furlongs Refugee 52 Powers. 12 to 1 won Srancne second Beldemere third. Time 1Ht' Fifth race. the Distaff stakes for two- v ear old fillies five furlongs Cleophus 120 Sims 12 to 5 won. Miss Prim second. Lady Mitchell third. Time 1 01 Sixth rare one mile Lehman 116. Tsral ft to 1 won The Winner second. Gotham third Time 1 Si l Seventh race. five furlongs Brandywlne 112 J Hill even won Lustre second/Man grove thrd Time 1 01U. Today's Entries at Brighton. First race. mite and a sixteenth Sir Dixon Jr115 Mirage 112 Copyright 111. Darien Marshall. 110. Kallirhoe 103. Premier. 101. Second race h ilf mile Simonian 114 Bonnie Eloise. 110 Joe Cutley Motorman 10k. Teat dd\ 104. Little Nlgger Bun Ronald. Ill Maud Adams. Racily Henderson 102 King Bon Friendship Sedgewlck Veldlz Aunt Sall Lottie H Consptrator. 101 Atlants 98. Third rare three-quarters of a mile- Oraclosa Trillette 104 Eon Homme. 102 Tremarpo Emotional OS Royal Rover 94. Kllza Belle. 93. Fourth race- mile and an egMh Pearl SOT 107 Illusion 105 The Dragon. Ml- rage 100. Fifth race five-eighths of a mile Rot terdam. US Sunny Slope ill Slow Poke. Russler. Meadow Thorpe. 111. Tlorian 108 Wyaluslng. 106 Chic. Altonwood 103. Fifth race half mile Newsgathenr 113. Rohbte W. 108. Pass Over. 107 Tulle Maker 106 Roseb n Doomful Kaiser Ludwlgr. 105 Braw Lad. Trlctlon Lawrence P. Klcpper Chic. 104 Trianon Hurl Merry Saint Mafia. Wood bird 101. Sixth race three-quarters of a mile hurdle hnndcap Flushing 160 Southerner 153. St. Luke. 142. Golden Gate Royal George. 135. Dab. Marble 130. Twenty to One Shot Won. Milwaukee W l August 4 Onlj two favorites won today at State Fair park. A great surprise came In the fir t race- when Ilinda a 20 to 1 shot. won easil Summaries' First rare. s x furlonea Hlrda. 105 T. Burns 20 to 1 won. Katie G second Mm- ole W. third. Time 1 I5 4 Second race. six furlongs Tlmorah. 98 Clay. r to 1 won. Provident second Fervor third. Time 1 15 Third rare one mile and twenty yards- Mister Fred. 113 Dunn. 10 to 1 won. Kin maker second. Miss Francis third. Time 1 42 i. Fourth race seven furloncs o gack 1107 Caywood 3 to 5. won rVedd e L T second Campania third. Time- 27H Fifth race. seven furlongs Innomar 107 T Davis. 7 to HI won Ida Pl Ptekwick second Mill P M. third. Time 1 27 4 Sixth. rare six furlones Hulbert 77. T. Burns 4 to 1 wont Bll rilison. second Constance third. Time 114 New Track at Newport. Newport Ky. August 4 Trie Queen City Jockey Clubs opening at the Newport course was an auspicIous one. The day was perfect attendance large Rod. track fa t. While there was a lack of class. the fields were vettlv balanced and It was a hard matter to light uteri a winner. Summaries First raw Ix furlongs Sus' B 107. C. Orahaw S to I. won Wang second. Cutlcero third. Time M4 Second rare five fnrl nr Angelui. 102. Ttnitton. 20 to I won J Walter second' Gvp Away third. Time 1-03 Third race seven furlongs Mancarct Al len. 100. Fowler. S to 5. won Trials C sen ord se third Pose 1:33. Fourth rave lIve and one. halt furlongs Marey 104 Fowler- even. won lloltered. second- Olympus third Tints lL Filth race seven Free Conage B wonTKUty BBfCOaTd iluffett third. Time 129 Millican Made Them' St. Louii. Mo August Bob MiUican a plug that never won a' race In second class company. went to the post today. in th third. rate at 200 to 1 backed down rom 600 to 1 and won easily from a fair Said Favorites took the first fourth fifth and sixth races and second choice to second. The track was fast First- race lx furlongs-Fannie Rowena 90. C. Slaughter. 1 to 2. won Virgin second. Mrs. Bradshaw third. Time 1:15 Second race one mile Hot Stuff 96 C Slaughter. S 16 I. won. Our Maggie second. Sycamore third. Time. 1:44. Third race. seven furlongs Bob Mllllcan. IC& Bonner. 200- to I won Imp. Thorn second Pitfall third. Time. 129 Fourth race mile and sixteenth Ace 96. Garner 9 to 20. won Jane second. Whisper third. Time. 14534 Fifth race live Sea a Robber. 105. E. Jones. a to 2. won Bin Dawdy second Uncle Pat third. Tune 1 04. Sixth race six furlongs Typhoon. 118. C. Slaughter. 7 to 6. won Dare II second. Seamar II third. Time las. American Horses Ran Well. London. August 4 This was the second day. of the Ripen Street Wilfred meeting. Tile race for the Claro plate was woo by Leopold de Rothschilds' bay filly Valide. E. Wishards bay gelding George H. Ketbam. an American horse was second and Mr. Vlnern brown colt. King Crow third. The August meeting at Brighton opened today and the racing will continue for three days. The principal events on the card today was the race for the Brookslde plate. which won iv Mr Richard Crokers Tale which started at odds of 6 to 4 etitst ritesoy was second and Llscard third. Eau Gallic late Utica formerly the property of air Richard Croker. but now owned try Mr. Sllsarv won th race for the Patchana stakes. Manxman was second and Halt third. The Alfriston plate of 100 sovereigns for horses- that had never won up. to the time of the meeting weight for age sex allowances one mile was won by Mr. Owsdens year chestnut colt Beaureguard. F. Grants thn old Bauvais II second and. H. McCalmonts three old bay colt Mllre third. Richard Crokers chestnut gelding Tennessee also ran but was not placed. New Track in Wisconsin. Kenosha. WIs. August 4 The Hanklns- Burke people who were ousted from Ruby Ind. purchased land for a race track in this county' yesterday ana say the track will be if operation In thirty days. The location Is at. Russell on the Milwaukee and St. Paul railway eight miles from Kenosha. POWELL PROYED POOR PITCHES. Columbus Took a Game from New Orleans with Ease. Columbus Ga. August 4 New Orleans was defeated by Celumbus this afternoon In a closely contested game the locals making eight runs while the visitors crossed the rubber but five times. Powell was In the box for the visitors and proved conclusively that as a pitcher he is a back number though he received superb support. Lament pitched for Cushmans team and held the Pelicans down to nine hits three of which were made in the first inning after which they were well scattered. Score. Columbus- at r. bIt. po. a. e. Carroll lb. 5 1 2 1 4 1 G Tord. cf 5 1 I S 0 ii Hess 2b S 0 1 1 0 Casey. rt. 4 1 1 1 0 0 Pedrose. ff McFaddenlb. lb. 3 1 1 10 0 1 Hall BS 4 1 1 1 6 1 Grim c 3 0 0 3 : 0 Lament p 3 12 0 3 0 Totals. 38 8 U 27 16- 4 New urieans ab. r. bit. po. a. e. Houseman. RS and p Bowman ss. and p Powell p and as. 4 1 1 0 I 0 Huston. It. Knox 2b Bowman. lb. S 1 1 It 0 0 Phelan. rf. 4 1 1 1 0 0 Bowie 3b Gondingc. c 4 J 0 2 0 0 Smith cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 Totals 36 5 9 27 15 I Sctre by innings. f Columbus cfl 3000 4 S New Orleans 30000010 1 5 Summary Darned runs Columbus 3. Two-base hits McFadden Knox Three- base hit Pedrose. Stolen bases Huston Bowrtan Double playS Hall to Hess to McFadden. Houseman to Knox to' Bowman Gondme to Knox to Bowman. Bases on balls off Lamont 1 off Powell 4 Struck out. by Lamont I Umpires Cushman and Carl. Time of game 2 hours. MOBILE TEAM. QUITS THE GAME. Montgomery Given a Game Fisher Would Not Finish. Montgomery AlsAugust 4 It was hard to tell whether tne game today win a greater exhibition of ball playing or wrangling. It was admitted that Mobile had the benefit of every close decision In both games yet Fisher quarreled with the umpire In a disgraceful manner. In the first halt of the ninth Wiley hit safe and stole second. Loisbeck claimed that Duliard who went to bat for Mangan let that Inning Interfered with him when tie tried to throw to second to catch Wiley and because the umpire could not see it that way Fisher called his men off the Held and quit the game which was given to Montgomery. Score MontKOm ry- ab. r-bh. po a. e Vandyke If. 4 0 1 1 0 0 Gorman. lb. 4 u v % 0 Deudy d. 1 0 0 3 u 0 Pabst. lb. 4 i o 11 I 0 Kehoe. rf. Wiley c 4 o 1 4 0 0 Mangan 2b 3 j 9 2 5 0 Peoples s 3 9 o 1 2 0 Bailey p Totals. 31 2 ti 24 12 0 Mobile ab. r. bh. po. a. e Dobbs. cf. 4 o o U 0 U Davis rf. 4 1 2 2 0 0 Godar. 3b. 3 1 2 S 1 Fisher as. Wiseman. If Lohbeck. c 2 0 1 2 2 0 Oliver lb 3 1 S 1 2 Paynter 2b. o 0 4 3 0 Schmidt p. 3 0 1 3 0 0 Totals. 29 9 24 11 4 Score by. innings- Montgomery Mobile 0 2 Summarj Earned runs. Mobile 1 Two- base hits. Fisher. Bases stolen PalM Dobbs Double pla Peeples to Pabst Bailey to Pabst. Paynter to Oliver to it r JBai es l alh off Bailey. 1. prf Schmidt 2. Struck out by Bailey by SchmIdt. 3. Time of game one hour and thirty minutes. umpire. Jevne Plttsburg 9 Louisville 5. Loulsvlle Ky August 4 T4Pittsburg caught on to Hills delivery In the tentn' inning and batted out a victory. Umpire McForluii Was badly off on strikes aul balls. McCreery and Dexter were fined sta each for kicking Attendance IW Score itH. E. Ixjulaville t 0 2 0 9 1 1 1 0 5 13 4 Plttsburg 001020020 4 9 11 4. Holmes. Hilt and Dexter Killen and Merrttt. Washington 5 New York 0. New York. August 4 The New Yorks won 4 ten inning game from the Wash- ingtons today and crawled out of u nth pace German outpltched Meekln. bpt had ragged support. limackley was instrumental in winning the game as he sent in four rots with his batting end scored once himself. Attendance sOu score. R IT T New Tork 000400010 l- 10 6 Washington 0100020200 5 9 5 Batteries Meeljin and Warner German and McGulre Cleveland 6 Chicago 4. Chicago. August & The CI elarda bunched five of thefr nine hits In the ghth tinning arid won SOmeWhat eahly. ihe playing was brilliant on both sides. PfelTer Was fined HO for objecting to a decision that really lost the volts the game. At tendance 6 0A Score B. HE Chicago. A 1 02001 A e 4 1 Cleveland 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0- S Batteries Fncnil and Kmrldge Young aql dimmer. Baseball at Brisbine Park Tomorrow. Interest to the frames Thursday and Fri. day between Augusta's champions of the South Georgia League arid Atlanta's crack orofesilonat team is Increasing and. The games will he witnessed bylarge crowds. Should the acres prove successfulother games will be arranged. The lovers or the game will have a chance to see teams from Charleston and Savannah and the Louis- yule Dttppers and the Reds. South Carolinians t Tempers CLEARLY Howlefs Make Life Other f peakers. SEETHH6BOiLHSWASSWr Chief of Police Defied ly-fcS Gatherjand a Fight Is Ay Giving the Mob Its Columbia. B. C. August As the late lamented BillJ press it all expected atone many men reach down and get th mens of Smith Wesson's on how to perforate the hum fire a few caliber remarks tt nA at the' campaign meeting. S- today. A very few men caused the row the meeting from being an ortolfr The row was caused by t-t now Dispenser John Stevenson that It would take more than on J carry off a boisterous fellow police had arrested In the the disorder. It occurred during Mr. to speak. Things looked for a while but were quieted one was hurt. There ere v who started in after glyjaj Evans all the ovatioathelrj assist them n doing to other senatorial and dates. v General Earle gave one mined rap for a repeated suit him which closed him 05 B fectually. Time and again dubf fa aries speech County Chairaa lj had to go' among the heelers txi kfa their giving him a hearing 4 When Mr. Duncan began to saw that he. had a hard road The howlers were merciless. the thing going steadily until it n the TOW. The howlers were at their Walt Whitman began to speak at them ana hurled some wry remarks into their ears. self to he absolutely he had a very UrerxeeUng when tei called and he could retire to catch his breath. v Mr. Harrison was also given heart by the crowd. J General rtlchbourg was given a n ful hearing. ISgfc General Watts got a kind of u M accompanied by a bouquet of Ipm Messrs. Mayfield and Robfnwi ji respectful hearing. B Governor Evans in his speech sort of an explanation about the. rebate business which will doubta satisfy such worshipers as heJm day. He went for the United Sttii Judges f Walt Whitman gave the lie to I ment made concerning his charwta talked plainly and pointedly to tti pensary howlers. J H Governor Evanssaid in rerudtl bond business that he hoped Ui would prove that. he would One other charge/ he said WH insinuation about rebates ToUW bell simply came and said. that i furnish whisky much- cheaper fromj io 10 cents- less than' then paying. I told him to writing and that was all it. I now have the offer in Columbia. Governor Evans went for States courts and judges. J tg The democratic party wanted a ganze them. he said. ton did the other day. Two ro cutting rates O'er your benefit in and prevented the road the rates. Isn't tbat damnabl tH These Judges areyour greatest ca J must cut the throats of they Invade the temple o put it in the theplatforttviht must not be elected for lire. General. Earle opened his speeclja nlfled manner- One of the E S had been making remarks about I eye. General Earle ignored iffer Finally he stopped his speech. f heeler In a determined manner M You cant give me one WJ General Earle told of bis refq N a certain legal case because connected with the state P said"This is entirely a free copa friends. and If you don't. want me Just step asde. I wont m suiting reply. to you orsay ntf will hurt your feelings but I mm you" don't want to hear me step U p finish. 2JL Chairman Lyles went amoug 1MH were creating the disturbance JJ that they should be quiet and A Earle a respectful Earle went on to deal with history of the world. i When Mr. Duncan took the crowd seemedmore disposed to M ever. Chairman Lyles had to the men trying to Jteep them t he told them Evans was respoMlwrj low plain of this campaign tlrfcrpwr itself hoarse for Evans. Duncan owned no newspaper he had dtzed. The crowd grew more tve and it was hard to hear Duncan said he needed no 1 who had shady records to them. Several men resented tea tloa that they were heelers were flats shaken at him. The howlers were malting loud for him to be heard. said he could tell a good i about Evans if they tvould just' the noise became so great that ii thing Duncan was h ard to sere the roar of voices thatbe COUML. that would bury Governor Bv a Chairman Lyles had been wP men to keep quiet all day but be with them. They fn further around In front of tt est to where Governor BwS' Chief If Police Gilbert could be Ing on to a man named Bob cro struggling crowd grew thicker sons tall form could be seen or the-crowd. He yelled that no could take these taco off. The separated from Ms man and t oLthe crowd. Duncan moved w second step of the sUndr1 friends rallied about him and' swept back towards the iron rounding the courthouse. Manr simply on-lookers expected the T guns and left the vicinity to n Governor Evans escaped the on the stand and tried to re"Many lists coulttte seen waTiltt while the row 31 as In progress- Duncan's frieriaa came t mm trouble was going on. telling MB his ground and make them l Finally comparative quiet as The strange part of it all w was no one for anj body to fight chief of police. Sheriff Ellison t cool came out of his oiSce. position near the stand daring watching for any serious trou arise. but none arose. ToXJleanse th effectually yet gently w& 1005. or when the Wood Is ta gith U permanently overcoffl constipation to awaken th liver to. a healthy activity J log or weakening ih n t achest colds or levels use firm Fusion MflJDL DeclafeTl Selej The state t row In the repj The most between the cx To do this If thlaffuslon Walter Hill ullstjwrangle for the nomiu erov which The corntni to appease his Present Hill will be r1ntendent s cat A. A Mui Judge fin oongress from or Jolly hlmse state. There will The first that conventlj The secor The third school syste The fourtj pensary recor. Thefiflb Improvement In natlor drawal of 8e t T consult eee- it some Unless thl executive cor dentT They man of the man. Hon. Thor otbe able to The Marl committee. A. A MurphJ Charles McGrej Prlngle. of ban Prohibition and Seaborn Wr tiny of the yesterday. Very few aut arrived. Those shaped affairs decreed that thimsaveswUhl nnre declared will be named ticket. They nave or prominent prohllj lag to make thej has been done ed. the plans art cult of the lonfe have organized steering commit i they' have mapp forthe conventio Wnat the bulkj what the brawn whether they will hasty forerunner fer to act for tl seen but those face say there when the atte brell. Colonel Peek Wright. wants wants to be go- didates In the probably the movement hlbitionists. Th of picking up strange land to\ state. They wi Ing of deltgatJ buck the eentel fusion movemenj Ion with the de an unknown will give bitter I Prelil This lf Its traps fixed They wrote to Cj bitionTparty. night to hold They have cord Hill of Macon aj the movement. with S. M. Zel ent of the Macon them a sit They have beer Gambrell and ha are waiting for and expect to hed dren. ye nave don he arrives today. their schemes. Watson lion Thomas Atlanta at noon yesterday3 but a I stating that he VJ b on hand until A' committee wa lIon occurred as Watson. Roonli at the Kimball hoi I object to thai Horible Colsion WU1e Clea. COROHE ILUGHLN SERCHING Rairoad Offical Are Deveopments Keenly-Jury Intelfgent aUc 1. The Quet cLughln resultng colsion ralroaJ excurson train Jlrey rairoad mladows jlater par tlstlmony hear W8 explanaton sinal McLu hln bong assste con lcting by lfrr ho undetaken winesses. rilad cOnpanNf repreSered eunsel hlarln/ Unit Id Stat s Sewal. vct rairod. W. Ilstant passenger Rairoad 11) train lsten' evldtnce. BtsUes. bth ha\ stlnOraphers tmony wi th t e suits Dayton wa Atantc tme jUr thl bOCK systcm safe g d' n coions bt admi perteet infallhle heings. e o anything d ot ques- tons fnaly admited ful slee. n ahe d. As expIctl statt approaching a shal un1tr wlthn 1' e(1 o ero.- stricty tierce competton ichola Long. crossing aL' ident hs way cear tratn se I I was are' usualy gven way al. trans st occup tons. I wl unti Wednesday may e conlnue Al vitms wel. and al may ultimately Irterest Inquest l cty loreran Atantc Clt cxCountr Lewis x astfr daltS groctr J. H31 Commissioner U. Afteroon Sssion Jur. Tht testIvny lrought t Oi t today stems fx drect' nsponsibity In\ rairoad testmony Far's e mies past dager Jnexplcable t e r-ason wi krown. rerfaton exceptonaly th. acci ent ths promptly control s tday Conductor that th t signal-a whiste. Int- rathlr nal u Jenly what le :1 i forcet latorm sl lal poston n evry wln ss. I Far made every sto\ colison 8lcc 1K CortYli mits ffteen fltt le might pulin It X strhtCorwurd sto a posiions thl lne R enttred vas 2 roa cear Winesses testfed class expr ss rlh way rai- Iau- way. SOl a nll tet Far cght Holahan tet- ted dd unti wa wihin twenty-five feet dstant thtn le acton acros tle boier r laved lie running 1 i tran testred hI Iot sl nal co sing rte mies id nott unti nlry sUI 11 wi probblr on de1 \.U lu MICIGA 1ERS MAyUFFER Neary Tousad Men rown Mih. Aug t fldln I en' and sh Cs Thi Rockef ier mnes clt. I shats emloy II alowed' fl Go eblc mgl mile practcaly al akeleld 10 range. on. tme IU employed I aew 10nths nEs wi. tnd famtlrs dLUtuton ltvera. nning pnies alowed al un- lads te ay worDS th e mf 0:0 ti e r Cn a f h tt comi w ntr. GU8IS I Cntued P t pg hear 1 totl aTt wor whiC t-adeu ou I lie fgrs btore r rht or newspapr atng trppng. en rising contiued countreb ha bln joined I queston J nt tme tcket I ha paty writen It I batte roya bten Id e ben saiing unU ar cal pasIng natonal oltcs. wih whie afairs ur wel lo\'ed G orgla ou al I I y u mater ou a Ameriansthe reponsibity vhlch rets Amerlcan transfer pwer ma wa trst up loi branchs unti Is lruence wids o er wlole disusion oth partsanship parlotsm sel be Core 1 rcat al. we Gergans IntErested the mft I Democtc Georga Wi 1ean. T e Geo gia come u ofcers vth ou ofcers 3bout tt lass mlst Ize you lostmas- tees i occa ona\ YO\ wih cfcer. moorshlneI f caught rs wih ofcers ery ofen. ofcer wl h ctzen Gcofia. I rerlrds felow to when lug le said I don't anything cou t. I these ttl justcc bothering me. InlfEstd tht ry Implss you-the thng consder r hom your :0' Is ou unti th demoratc' cIien right th I ran to o r admllstr- tion. he grel ou ren education chidren. the democratc govrnment Georga fo1 whie li 1. 171 1loO dlrecly Q1 1tOJ year h\ magnt ent lGUlo educate chidren o rosperty Thm was 10 unti conrol Fror tme 0 prsperty thriC walted e ect democralc GtorGI al souther. stutes. When control afer povrty ow lsten accompl he 4 O Cactorlls. had 1G WwnearIy tmes and al thngs lke proporion. 1g0 caled t guberaaoral goveror helr tn Earnesly cCsclentoualy strivfn tul IndlvduaUy. Wha. democratc elced I ne l every etor ha C ma e justce cottrmen. Whatver at- Go aued forr ly deposied d states pa In erest thcrfby thousanddolars 5 contnued 1 sid paying 12 rt you posi It exceplJns I saely the don't OU e Interst ctzens goveror confscaton Xortheaster rairoad defalaton payment dorFed leae dolars h d addid uJe money deposied el polcy I bpn eteet tnc e O of nw et contnued felows bat vernor. Id 10Ut and. It I Teleg Aobaa Bfore cease Ir te eror hande Ter- hl sience. Georgins I messag empie Itate Therp 1 fe-- sad tey bat u Ire Georia manpu- 1ted republcas tey ppulst frenda s thmeh8 tht oUipplUst eunten were to toledby' tdr' tk. lere I teahel r 2 Y whl Cje t. th t' tedO tu" :11 :1 Cre Glveul th. ne1.ndttl Red IrtterruPted tb roverror 1 wi ed Het ttbereplr whic Alabaa len Jh' who4oubt tllnterrltyot the Reprt rceived idicate Aljea gven- te democratc a m jorty rty thousnd Ind bth houe te b8dcmocratc two maJoriy. Th\ Innuncement toUo1ei lotel Con ct Queton t en chief eecutve thl commcnwellth have h11 e I thl leae qu stIon I wt th t present con i blotm far Ccttheo Silce becnl I al conditoI unf rtunate criluil levIated bleve t hen hal llws Itato I punlhn& oelders I sti b alowed th. bnrk ot C lt 1 aUy nuthrlz d leer th luch Inspcton Ihould- Jc tematcnly I isurl talt luh or I CIrlttan land. convit laws. 01 wi executed. reerd hln neJ cnvict epire. ad mke as eDploym nt states leg lature uuthorleJ leale prislers pa tt. w1 It. 1elp God" Lud refrrd strring lhowlng. n 01 ptactces employe 1 slme Ct necessiy putng I I authoriy kal glvinJ to ay mljht praclced. anounc d bele distrits a c5Ired pUblc alowed so.- Dscusses Natonal Poltics. l avlng announce Jralrs ror tonal favor bimctallm posed Iold le frequenty nl ques populsts to 11 he repled wih wi opponent. Ne1oes neSoes aong earest Goveror dttprmlne que ton him amorg nen whE1 queston In oChls al atenton. 1) r a ectable whi pol- wal strring sigQted fxcamatonf f n hI rterre In thtir chidren bHI give publc schc their aplalst FnalY teling thtm IUppre5 law determnat n i y d fa ec e t y s' I I i excamations forthf tme teing jovernor perorlo populsts eere shoulde o wih In cfrrts rC eem from thl tois tht rop wlnlng i. hen concultl amountc ovaton camplgn 6 trest lual wav tJthupasm il counr. ont rock GARES WLL PULC. altmores Lft strments Behid BaltmorE d. 4. the Garret ra e lublc \.il lated Towson Balmlre lS andmakCs substanialy hlssle dev 1elte. I ret. lequeathes 00 tE ons. brother Garret 200 t Wilam F. 30. NI- th Glrret 2O toA. fo tary Ir. Garret. Al r st tOl gvn Gart absolutely. lr Garret hlr execetors to BAKERS INDICTD a" Bak Carged Work Ia. The jur Thoms 11. ga J. Ier B Brechtl Yltnm R O. las d dcunt Depslt wih n as Insolvent wi bl unt tlm yare A GLD MFT. Delegtes Indan- .No Ticket 11. Au ust4.Cclonel LM of' Marshaltown caled' democratc at ocock afernoon. fve democrat. I. Indlanapls conventon wl oppositon puttng tlc feld POLICA SHOT. l. Augst Abut to ant forma regIstere plator th conventon. ClAgget. Ciy Dule t-n invitton Le Mante the comtee sentatve mEmbers pary numbr t s ret al niht polical situaton advisabity puting fpld tal. Orllans L Augst 4 ppul t conenLon Luisiana veneen. PI. belnJ relresente. Te ommltee on. resulltons sfvrl hourl W wmlle repor W8 sige araigne laly stte natonal Rihmond. Augst 4. dmocratc commite mf tonight Elon Hick Augst 4. cmo Iat stat' ccntrt1 commitee. afernoon. Elot Ste venRons resJ nallon accepto. lclroit w elp ted charn c Mih. Augst atendL- confer nc. ree sUv r dfmo rats al partlo MfehlBan w Toma Wilon Jacklowal electet8ntona cmo' mteml t democrt. fron dlerentcUe cho n a avlorydetgates to g to d1apQUa i o I Ci- O c. HOOrjDE RkEr latchFaUareDIIorlnd th Fian atWorld TOOKT Ccago. Stock E Cange Wl Bm Cosed Awhie CIT TKES HOEL VIE Neiter Diaond Nor1i- cut ued Propre tor Hu AUlst UI a pOJI ' ay estma t lar e fgre It ramlfcatons unquetona ly chaled enorousUne NewYork prce Damond hal leIni itbesum handng 00 ad the Bicuit pany 0. cstmated Mores purchase h11t te capia ot. Damnd ad Bscuit bear I proporton tota. Wiiam 1. fr prsent t 1. JJorl ha Immediate actve 01 speculatve n. C icao lat nigh decared positon Wiiam' I trst preldcnt the' New Yor nscult H. More vice faiure had demoralzlg efld prles Xcv pries sO frst Ttnged Croe 3\ H wester. shcks. lke Burlngton 51 bellg 3urerers. Chiago stok Indelnite pe- acton decded mttt- whch sentatve bak st echange commitee num\ r PTomlnet. capltal ts meelng as lsemble Intormaly afer aternoon fr. Jam s cals commitee IX- meetng afcr- accomplshed commitee adjourne unt tomorrw t non J. Sf Inances dealngs Dlamnd and Dcuit I e ldf I o cxch e tle Mo re tanglt. talghtened 01eu wrelde al t e wa 16 17i s sel. Tlk Amour. b. suppoled hold rJ sluatior- I le faLurt s s curtes Bsci Ir. Arncur hareajed cals the unt:1 arralempnts Cal InGlIcuals hr al nd 0 for ail m ldle fg lawyers lfe pased Thtlr frst Inture be co feld wa organizaton Frer AJle hich u they organied 110 successful Bscuit can Straw ther holt y IUs ag. ther mn- belh Yed tme faiure. faiure bcleved entre l rsoal Chiago avance Yark wi Iy afected I a trst-das3 conditon. A. betwet anr20 cent paying whist lscul ad ears J. Michel the1nols Savlng. lte I wi Match Syndica te Stok I bcltvcd efort wi Dlond I acton poslbe faiures reultng colapse wli try baner" 400 wort' stok. colateral loal- wi tement. Atthe Itock oIces a gcneal teelnG unealnEs e Ifg faiure stunn firprlse\ verbd businesi was bIng Iccurltes. the as o rlc oilcla1 icloslnl Insttulon tlmporarly. FOn BRYAS NOTCATON. Tesuer Perfectng A - rngemet th Event Yor Aust Treaurcr WiHam te democrat natona cmmite siver It Th re wu otll ple walt- ng gt t' ohn ad wa Inwerlgquc8tons al knds. 11. Wen Illdthat name tpeaers notfcaton meetng 1laa on suae ha bn aeleted b' daYI' more Tbe. ad vance rngerents or meetngae fver. blng p edout wl Uclets amslon necesar gatenbut al thefeat Wl te flee TerarGregir t I l1dWon tere wU b halr' d I denTbeeeataandchaW1be rt- re fm7. oeockI theeenm i TheJ wUbljIXLuatsreuredtor r 1heC plattoT' wIUbO reered 9J t - .i NrPoi DJuN ToLng Shot l eliyLncit BnyerWeathJ. H RD MUUca Fiv ludre ne Tg It DAMIE DOES VEY. Favorte ad Poor-Day To Ten Game of1aebal. t I Detroi Augst lumme zeetng opene tack afeoon. wa ad tarI statng machln I wel. I tavorles outider wlnnlug. I I I und preEn eventot Itera- I tonalderby Bweepltaes I 0. wa rn. I wa I Da. ml n a l. I a lot lavorle Ldy W8' 1. feld prompty Nimro Rmlero Memad ahea fst q ar- advntage unti the dlstn e droppd bckbeaten Argentna threequarter Argentna p15ed. Argentna mif poslns mie traiig began hli feld beten frOD frvorltc. nt\er miePreslcn 1O brtn. TI Od4 re furlongsJennie Rowet Needah Tim ra fve fllrlongs" 18 got Stton second. llradio Tme. 1:0I rae. Interatona cneand mles-DamiCn 12 R. Wilams sec rd Argentna 2:2G furlmgsrvlce. 10 1. 1. I1 le 1:2 turlong-Halfinl. 1 9. Le to Woods thlrTlme 1:1' Detoit rce onl mleHelfn 93 Bele 9 Hosmrra 10 Pentry. 10 Ldy LaSale 10 10 10 10 lt tveelghths mIeRI- dtau. 95 101 Sulvan Thom 10. rce. mie sevtnty ynrs 9 10 Al Le- 10 10. I ui u r ' if thKa aH l Trimutn. Queen Evalne Fil Mlnesela. l Maraquita Drambleet Ataneva. 10. ICh mies. I hal chasMaId Elershle. 13 Heley. 12 Slas Pikering. 10 13 TscarorSewanee 144 Bradon. Oalty. 14. fvp-eb hths mle-Celoo. 10 Lxington 101 10 Colatlral W- ScarbrouJh. lU Le 10 Rces Brghton. Brlghtl Au ust 4 decide ant Dstj1 stkes. to hancf cpture tecnd llsta staes First fve furlonlsKama. 10 5 2. Dar ete se ond Hght Roya 1:02' Se ond fve Sulsun 10 2to 10. or mls- 10. Do get ut Song thi. 14 2' staes 2- eD9id Sth rJ l"T" 1:1' race. Dlstaf year-old fles fve furlongslt phus 12 5 Lay 1ltrhf1 Timp 11 mieLehman 16. I to1 Thl 1:19 Se fve furlonpBrandywlne. 12J. Hi. s condl Man- 1:01 T days Entres 1rgMon. Frst racp. miE sixteenth-Sir Jr. 15 Mlr e 1 Coprl ht 11 Marshal no Kalrhoe 101 Rfcond racl hal mleimonian. 11 10 Cutey. lIotormal. l TeafJddr 10 LHtfNIsger I Adal. Emly Bender- lon. Bldgewick Veldl Saly. Ltte A tan tIS 9. three a. mHI Tritte. 10 l 2 Emotonal 8 Ryal 94 Elza Bele. race. mie pghthPearl lO Iluson rle. 10. Firh r ce fhe mieRot- tope 15 11 10 10 Alonwood FCh racl. hal mleNewsgtherr1 RQbbi- 10 Pais 10 Tute 10 ROleban. Doomful Ludwig 10 Ld. Trleton. lePt rah Ja three a mil hnudCapFlushlng 16 Suthern 1 t. 12 Glte Geore l 13. Tenty Mlwauker. With A t 4. favorle' alr en me frt whEn eai mF rarp. SIX Hrda. 10T. Rur 2 1 won Kate l1n. nIp lHi furlnn 9 won Povident. seconl 1:1 mfP. mie an arg ltpr 13. 1 on r:2 econd Iss thlrdTIJe 11 en ftrlo' oae 10 Caywod3 5 Pred' L. T. fec- Tmcl Fifh re. furlonjlnlomar 10 Ta. ls Pt" Mil t f. third ra si turtonIsHulher iT Purn. I. 11 Flson. secnd ConstanC. 1:1 N ack NewQr. Atst 4. ClyJotky Cubs op nlg t Nevrt courp a on aUplcoulone Te d y. wa rrft atendanc lare tr c ft Wh11f thfrew11 I dal. ffld reenly blAnced tnlt wal aar ater taUght u n aWer r Lix furiongus' B. i0. 8' 1" WagEecond Cle tlrdTlmet1 1l f1e" frn I eu 10 nrUon. 2 twon JWater 8 On thi. Tml hd fttEeven trlonJs1ai IA t 5..won Triie Cie oJI Mat tird Tm l Fourrc fn. on ro Macy 1 tter eve wn lolteed T t l 1fE Wlf L Li Mo. u& t 4- l 1 lurthaf neVerwanea ra 1lC cJ. went tht P08t0da7 I t. thld It 20 l a e' dow fm G tal eaiy a fa fed. Fayorle. tookthe st- tout f. nd sit e s cndchol e l" ieond. tracWa. fat re I fUrlon s-Falle Rowena CSlaulter Z on Vrgi ae ondYr Bradshaw thlrdTfme115h Secnd .ace\ mleHotStir 9 C. Slulhter bl wonOur Magge' see n. TIf 1:4. Thr leventrlongSBOb M1Ica. 1 z Thor Cond. Pltal Tie. 1 mIe siteenh ce 1. 2won se ond WhfJer tird. 14 Fth fve turloIsSf1 ROber 10. Z ond Pat thrd T e. 1:0 si' turlongsTphon. 1 I. I I thid. Tie 1:5 A rc Rn Well Lndon AUlst 4. wa' Rln Wltre fmeUng. Te plae Lpold deRothsehtds' bayfly Valde. Ketba n rt ek C n IJd Te ugst metng il contnue t1e a Te crd..to- Wa Brooxsld h WO" h r. Croke 8 Yae. Ihchstated t 1USt rlCJCv I third Ga e Utca t prry tr. b SIIary th. staes Manxma TeAlrston 10 soverelgsfor hotes. ha tme meetng for ag alow- mie ws bylr. Owsdenl old Beauregard FGrants old I sec. Icalmonts three-ear old Mlre Rchar t Tennesse ran " 1laced. T ck Wisconsi. enosha Augst. The Hnnkln.- trm rac yesteray. an th wi b op raton t rty locton Ru sel Mlwauee raiway. eght mies Kenosba' OWL ITBR. Colubus Tk" Gme Orean wit Eae Ga ugst New Oreans defeate th1 aternoon locas whie visiors cros- e rbber fve tmes. Powel bo vlslor3 prov d concusively tat a picher bac numberthough recived Lont piche Pelcns histree e frst afer tey wel scatered Colubus ab. a 3b. GJor ct. I 2b. 5 i 1 f. 4 2 2 3 1 J 1 Halss 1 11S.1 c. Lmont p. 1 3. Totls. 6 i r 164 urteans ae 1. p.6 1 1 4 4 0 Bowan. p. I 1 1 4 4 Powell p. ss. 4 1 1 1 O. Kn x. 2b. 0 2 4 7 0 Ib. 1 O. Jhelan I Dwie 3b. 4 0 1 3 O. I Gndlng ct 4 Totals. 3 Z l Inig i I m ns. r t gg 8 i ned 3 his. Thre- bae hit lowtan pla Hal Gndln Kn x onbnls. et mont 1. of Ppwel 4. byLamont Carl M01lL TA. QUT T GA Montomer Ge Fher Fih AiatAugst I Wa tcl me wa exhibltoJ- bal p3ylpg wrng- Ung. I admited. Jfoble te eft ose decsln bth wth dinatetul frst WIey hi Lhbek clalre latth t1i hfn re tQ a f e trow lley bcause upire coul thtt Flsher caled ot gme whih Wil gven llontomer Montjompr- hbh 1. I e. Yaidke It O. U rman. 31. I :3 I 2 TEECONSTITUTIOI ATLNTA GA WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 5 1896k AS ti th WILLBEA 1n ii l1 t i 4 l Sewall. VCe i May 11 r ee I I 31 i 1 i 1 I ir r ap- 1 o 1 they gi t I explicitly t I fli feetof or usually all. jury t ex-County I ury. i directresponsihitity Ir. i forty-five C 1 exceptionally gve t by at Farr ef- ohen sacceled 5 live i Sc C stg- i. I j I i i first-class i. larr way. 3 5. T e t s I t jtl OnItded It Utj Eightmousaud i de o 9 z e oe l j Is T1 un,1 enthera havlnat thc i o i ae 1 PIi1EP. nolties the transferof many na- overfl- Ge rgia with raned incontaCt very they court. g you for iOOOtO tTl00J F prosperity accomplIshed 24HO000 GToOoOCWnearty Iheir or justIce method forrrrly dol- de- em gov- befooled ii e gtvAIbeItfs1ie I jfl th. Integrityof had t presenCmanagement convicts power1 when pt Clristian next the wll systema.t- belef tta- intvrrupted by they ap- fitt suppress dcccl. wore cerise morey ii. ta The. ill itit hl T. 2OCJ0 30OO PaDeposit Wlliam d MayBeElected Colonel L. Martin. he tielcetin About On lateinto 4. The new The ElliottG charman. A as t Neltherthe Ruined -I--L-Tt tbO stock.'of t t th is- westernstxks c. stcIt ex- toawait were tucede situation securIties stoj. arratgements whenthe h t G and J. theillinois ap- 4000000 was re th t. b1gnseetingare re- re- 100. seats thf. conunitteeand ll1 WEREHIT asoftThlngoflt DAMIEN ad Two covered tls 1' i:4i'/ Jennie il4a. ltido I ig i:0l3 ServicC. 1:2S. Rossnmra. Ri Sistep 107 mile- Evaline Ia TuscaroraSewanee mile 106 The Karma Itight Royal 1:02'4. Suisun. 5. 1:02. 1:4S Refugee. furiongs-Cleaphus. 101 mile-Lehman I. turlongs-.Ltrandywine J. second i:014. 115 lii half mile K Sally Fou th. Rot. lii mile Ill 108 Roseban Vt oodbird Flushing 113 ill Only first easily. furlongs tV I:1B4. furlongs I 1:11 1. won Mi3 ftinletsgs-Coseack 3 12T'/ funiongs-4ngomar Mitle l:27i. funlones4uibert 1:14. The fast. Sus C ti4l. tnge1u 102 B J. 0 ye TIrn Manjare 1tFowler 5 wler 1. Itt 1102Fowier. Sto 6. won IittyI9 5 co I * s d EIcli s the I. from cond the4 5 qg 1i5. ace1 mile-Hot b furlongs-Bob 20 2won 1OL furlonge-7phcon This bayfihly ys. wag by fr the TbeAlfniston year year na G a Gffordcf Hess,2b.,5 U Gnimc. Iamontp. a p. 4 0 0 Kneix2b. Dowieib 2 0 11 t Smithcf. 01 Totals..g ccre Columbus..0'1 3. 0 0 0 NewOn1eans 5 Summara-aarned 3 1. It Montgomery- cf..3 4 0 1 1 0 0 c. Mangsnlb. sa. p. 2 0 1 1 2 0 r bIt a e. ii 4 0 1 2 2 3 0 1 3 0 1 C. Schmidip. 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 o Earned 1..Two- plays Peyrtter. Bases. on bails. 1 Eiilladeiivery t H. 0 Pittsburgo o I U 2 0 U 2 0 9 lenth WashIngton0100o2o30 Meeliin andMcGuire Clecelards ofthefr ninelaits j he sidesPfefer 5510. 11. B. 0 2 0 0 111 5 Cleveland..0 54. 9 Fnenl gamesThursdpy the. by large sueessfuI othet the CaroIIa A(311. Temp H wleis' SEETHINBBOILINB MASSABT Gather and I je Bill lj at one downand t tt buns5 t Ia Steyen fellowth5 theff Dtacajg Th1agsolooke y quietede giving ovatioa tbeirits In I gubernjdoi repeatedatte u heelersaa4 4 heanin fs' b' lnthe thelrt He rts unhowg- iii retiretoj andRobsta explanatlonabout daub0 he Eta tas hlschan isiM Evans aId re hehoped t gdS isooo. s This mS e frumStelO theil i my See wMt nefit. Hi from thaCdamnabie. are your these thetempleof our r1i thesi GeneralEarle theEgW it' heeierin ofbis refusal casebecsuze lte goveri1m. CQIIOh 15 ms or say yotrdont aiik amcegl a54 gse respect ful hearing TbtS. the t It s emei more tobS1 BO toeep quI. Evanswas respOsei the 5 newspaper-he ha neededno hee1 hi were tbii liLt thOyvoald heard that he cOU1 EVI alldaybUt nothing with l& aman sI 10 the crowd. andU of the do towardsthe fr Ot haste. could te l ab pro relu 11110. on Li i1t0 was vat. on snybody trouble To Cleanse the when cehenthe ho overCO the them ta' aches a I' A 1 i 7' b chai Sele rei Todo 4 ir i WalterB' 1 i t. to Co so Ca f' LA. wtl conventi burt The' fifth InnatIo I S 4 i6' Jo ee I Ui Co S k. Morph MoOre Prahibiilon W po au themselves with 1 tve co prohi the so a J bulk 2 wil I 5 t I v. i a' L jon 10 d legat movemer. d pa Pooh C blllon party an " c cor tt a 7- 5 signifi bee andexpect he do w be onhand e While theywaJ 1' ho i. ha a . ' . , ¬ . , . < > . \ ¬ < . > , > ¬ - > > ¬ . \ ? - , * > \ ' * > , > - ; \ . < > ( . ¬ \ ¬ - - < , \ \ > \ \ \ \ \ > \ \ ) > - > > > > . } , , - ! - ' - . - " > > ¬ . > . \ ) , - ' ! } - ) ' ! , - - , ' ¬ _ ' > ! - \ } ¬ < , , ¬ - ¬ \ \ - , ) ¬ - > , - > ' ¬ > < = ' , , - - ' - " . . , - ! 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