The Anniston Star from Anniston, Alabama · Page 4 Click to view larger version
November 5, 1939

The Anniston Star from Anniston, Alabama · Page 4

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The Anniston Star i
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Anniston, Alabama
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Sunday, November 5, 1939
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Page 4
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THE ANNISTON STAR t X J S S i v . . t l l A I Hi I ' U S l ! I S I I l N H CO I»rr*[if ·1 l i . r con 01 u KlUrrrc *J *Tn^(1 r!»' A r m o u r . M if.nr. * CU) i a : i Ci!» ,-*.T: CltT r i r f In i ' . f C ' l t f l l thf v i - R'.!»:c !'· -. I" «J S C X n . A Y . N O V . .",. 1!);!!) S c u m i i n a v i a ( ' n i n e s T h r u u ^ h ; i v - i ; - . i | r ( i u n l 3 i t ' s p | i r i - - h i p f t n 1 I h f ; : i i ! i ot Use rnn 1 .- ll L u n t u n e d for · · C i l y of Kim!." n - i i in- t ; ( - L ;:i;im|-( - i l l V ' c i l . - i t m i l o f l r ! w i l h - f i i i i i i c i l l i c r H i ! - well t - m : i ' ! i r l v - l l,chii-.d (hv w n i l s of law u n i l l i f l h t - u l l M H - s s 111;,: ' l n - i - r w i l l 1:1- l c - f l hti i ; i u m i d for i - f . i i b i i l i o n on t h e r : i r l tit Uu 1 l o l : i l i l ; i r i : i i i s . A:ncTii : ri!is t'.nvi- h ' - i - i ; | j ; i r l i m ' . . i r ] y i n i i T c s l c d in F i r . l a i u l tx-i-.i-.isi- sin- h.;i s f l i n w n siu-li ;i l i m h rc-fjnrd f o r her m ; c - r i : ; i ' . m n ; . l i l j l i i : ; i t ions. I m v i i l K I'omiiHii li lu |;iy hc-r d e - I l l s io t i n s c i i i i n I r y i i f l c r p r a c i n - i i l l y i l l o f o i i r o t h e r W o r l d War lc-lj!nr.s h.-iil ck-r.-iiiilcd. l!ul 1)11.1 is not Iho D u l y r i ' J i s o n w h y \w- h i i v v I K e n j i r ; i y i n i ; f o r the s n f t - l y ol K i n l a n d a n d h e r s i s l e r slates'. Wr are i n U j r c s U ' i i in I h i 1:1 liccnu-.r: l l i e v , as liave we. chose u l i v e t l n - i r o w n l i v e s w i t h o u t seek ins: lo n-.nlcsl o l l i e i s a:;d in Hie hope l h a l they t i l c i n s f Ives w m i S d not he inoles!ed. In oilier word;-, t h e y lia\-e diiisvii llio way of peace. M u r c o v e i . t h e i e s h o u l d he a n e v e n f . r e a t c r reason why we s h o u l d he i n l c rested in t h e ; S c a n d i n a v i a n countries. Fur t h e y h a v e developed w h a t i s t o d a y t h e f i n e s t c i v i l i / a l i o n i n the world. They h a v e almost completely oblit- e r a t e d i l l U c r a e y , I h c y h a v e ' UOIH- f u r t h e r t h a n a n y other c o i m t h c s i n w i p i n g o n l p n v e r l v , they have learned how to reconcile the. interests of p u b l i c and p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y and at the same l i m e t h e y have t a k e n a foremost nart in HIP a t t e m p t lo solve the w o r l d ' s i n l e r - nalioi:al p : o M e i n s in a s p i r i t of peace nud a m i t y . But even u r c a l c r t h a n ..these reasons is t h e fact thai we here in the U n i t e d States arc in- riehlcrt to t h e m for I heir hii:h concepts of the d i g n i l y of p i a i i . as they h e l d lo h i n h ideals of i n d i v i d u a l f i e r d o n i lonj; before t h a t rij;hl w.-is wrested from Kin.n . l i i l i n of K i i K l a n d at l l n n - nymede by (he d e f e n d a n t s uf Ihesc same c o u n t r i e s of UK: N o r t h , whence comes the Nor- n«tii blood of which MIL- K n u l i s h are wont lo boas'. It would be a n a ^ e d y of t r a g e d i e s , therefore, if I h e n o x i o u s doctrines of Russia niul G c n n a n y should ovi:; r u n these c u t i n l n e s and s u p p l a n t t h e i r f i n e c i v i l i / a t i o n w i l h Ihe reptile press, t h e suppression of r e l i g i o n , the Gestapo. Ihe i - o n c e n l r a t i o n ciiinp, the cinse of p r o p a g a n d a in tt-.o schools and all t h e o t h e r i l l s t h a i are r h a r a c l e r i M i e of a d i r l a t o r s h i p l h a t is i v . o l i v j i t e d by ideas of coiuiuest u n d e r Ihe f!ai; of Ma:s. ?ss Is A d j o u r n e d Tho Congress w h i c h I M S J U M a d j o u r n e d d i d a (,-ooti jol) in t e c o i d tin-.e. Tin- Senate \v;is K i v e l l n i l t h e ini-.e i l d e - i t c d In ilc-b:iU- Hie f H i r - s l i o n o f t h e e n i t M i o a n d w h e n l h ; , l d i s - cussion wns over t h r u - v,-.i.-. l i t l l e i i - f t for I h e Hou.,e to s.-(y. It is w c i l . t h e n - C o i o . t h t i t it ( I l l i c i t l y r ; i t : f i e i l t i l e i i i - l i n n e l f t i n - l l | | H T l l n d v a m i vo!e(! i n r c i ' . i : n h o m e f i : t h e c u n s i d e r j l i d l l r.f [ I n . - : . [ ' . - t i c is.-i.,.s. Tho A I : ; V . U I M St;.r favored f m : \ i Ihe f i , M ! . . · I r|;( :i. i l : M i , - l ; l i ; i ! -^. i. w h k ' h w;is l l ! l l i : u - ; i l t o i i o l h i,:.: : : - , t « - i - i . . i i M I U ! u x l e r i . ; i l ri'liilion.^. : y. « · :· j u i c e I'h.a the Vel: i i . . ! - i - w,^ . .,,':. : .-,.,| n u l ,[,,, (-· or -.,, r[ . ss u : [ ) u s e . It liliitfu u l''ntUT!l;tl S\ l . . Ihe d e a t h o : ' C h a i . e - i l (; : Syl; t fiiui!:i Xe '.-.. ,.;..; ·'.,. T. A n n ? , cdito;- .| Tne 1 1. , Mi 1 . C i r e e r l i a c i h.-,-n n : i| : nnd Sylacauiia f u r s i x t y J-C-:,K. l t i ; i n K w h i c h t u n e ho served ;, Secn-tury of Si:,i,; i n d ),;»! Ijr-forne I ' t - l l i j - n i z i - i i us one nf A l ; i l i ; n i , r , " s fi.u- ir.osl | ) o l h i - i , l ler,:!.-:,-. Ab! ( , M .,., i ; i | .,,.,, i l n n . of f r i e n d s . M r . A I : , I S IK.S i i v . d :: , A l . , ^ , i . . ; i less l h ; i t i ti'i: yciir.-,. b u t iliiui.,; ili.-ii '.n...f lie l, : , f r.-i;,(ie Tnc H u m s v i l l c T i n n ·, ;, iH"'.vs|),-i]H-r llu.l i ^ re.pccf..(l [b.roii^houl I h r S n i i i h . w n m i n - l . , i l'.ni'.;('ir i i . a i j y i,(-i-.;oi)ii! f r i i - i i f ! - ; i| : e w h i l e . I l i j - i i i i l i v e i i o i i . f i s l-'r,.i.;:|in. Trim., a n d t h r i c he |i;i» H O I K - on his n i i s - l i n i ot sorrow, carryji-.j; w i l l i l i n n [lie s.v:n|ialliy uf all id U'lioin ho has I K - C U I I I C c - n d c n i c d . Our Distinjftiished Guests CiOvernor Frank M. Dixon is to be commended for having refused m a n y i n v i t a t i o n s ·from every section of the state d u r i n g t h e t i m e he was f a s h i o n i n R his legislative pro- K r a i n and d u r i n g the sessions of the bcfjisla- ture. l ^ u t n o w - t h a t most of the measures ho a d v o c a t e d as a candidate have been w r i t t e n into law and .-ire operating lo the salisfaclion of t h e vast m a j o r i t y of the patriotic citi/.cns of A l a b a m a , he likewise is to be commended for UikiiiK t i m e off occasionally to renew ac- iuaint:mc,?s over the s t a t e and to s t u d y al f i r s t h a n d problems t h a t a p p e r t a i n t o t h e s t a l e ' s a d v a n c e m e n t . ll is a p p r o p r i a t e , too, that C a l h o u n C o u n t y s h o u l d become one of the first of the counties l h a l !!e (inve.rnor purposes lo visit d u r i n g t h e rr m a n i i n i ; years of his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . For i t was t h i K c o u n t y t h n t r a l l i e d i m m e d i a t e l y t o h U c i . n r call for a new deal in (he a d m i n i s t r a - tion n : t i n - p u b l i c a f f a i r s o f A l a b a m a d u r i n g ; h i s f n - - t i . u n p a i K n foi 1 t h e G o v e r n o r s h i p i n I I K M . A l l h a l t i m e , (,'iilliuun KUVC h i m t h e o n l y i n a j o r i i y he- received in t h e entire stale over both G r a v e s and McCord. And in his second and v i c t o r i o u s c a m p a i g n C a l h o u n i i j l a i n j j a v i 1 l i n i ) a sixable p l i i r a l i t i . a)thoiif;li UK i c w c i e s l r t i n g personal lies t h a t b o u n d ? i i a n \ o f u-.jr c i t i / . e n s t o h i s o p p o n c ' l l t f r o m 11.o ! j ( M ; i (.'ounl·, G u v c r n u r D i x i n i comes to C a l l i o i s n on l l i i s o i - c - a s i u n as t h e guest of the Rod and Gun C l u b of Furl M c C l e l l a n , who w i l l be. assisted in his u i i l c i ' l a i m n e i H by the m c n i l j c r s of Ihe ( . ' a l h n u n C o u n t y S p o i l s m a n ' s C l u b . This online; w i l l e n a b l e h i m t o v i e w tile m a r k e d i m p : o v c i n c n l s l h a t h a v e been made a l t h e fort in recent years and il l i k e w i s e is so t u n e d as l e t e n a b l e h i m to e n v i s a g e '.he i;rcat p a : t Ihi.-. A l a b a m a asset plays in t h e n a t i o n a l defense, as evidenced by tin: a r r i v a l here t h i s week of t h o u s a n d s of troops ot t h e F i f t h Div i s i o n for i n t e n s i v e li'aininc;. Il is l i k e w i s e a h a p p y i n c i d e n c e l l i a t we; .should h a v e Ihe o p p o r t u n i t y of c n t e r l a i n m t ; alont; w i l h Governor D j x o n one 'f his chief a i d s , Ur. W a l l e r H. Jones of t h e S t a l e U e p a i t - m e n l of ( . ' o n s e r v a l i o n . These t w o men h a v e a common i n t e r e s t in t h e i r love of God's n:,:al o u t - o f - d o o r s and they see a l i k e w i l h icspccl to t h e c o n s e r v a t i o n of all of A l a b a m a ' s n a t u r a l resources-- i t s wild l i f e , its fisheries, its f o r e s t r y , its p a r k s and p l a y g r o u n d s anil i t s y r e a t m i n e r a l assets. In t h i s endeavor they h a v e I K ' C I I H I V C - M u n s l i n t e d cnupu.ralin.it by sportsmen of the t y p e of Ihose w i t h whom Ihcy w i l l fniternixe t h i s week-end. And K-'C all should pay our I r i b u l e to these excellent eiti/.ens, because they arc w o r k i n g nol so m u c h for Iliciuselvcs as for t h e i r posterity. W h i l e in this section, Governor Dixon also w i l l a v a i l h i m s e l f of the o p p o r t u n i t y lo m a k e his f i r s l v i s i t to Cheaha -Stale ['ark, where he w i l l have an o p p o r t u n i t y to s t a n d upon the slate's h i g h e s t e l e v a t i o n n n d feast his eyes UIMDII an e x p a n s e of scenery lhat has challenged the a d m i r a t i o n of t h o u s a n d s of v i s i t o r s from every section of the Union. This great iisscl of the slate is in dire need of improve- m e n t and as a result of t h e Governor's v i s i t it is to be hoped t h a t larger developments there w i l l not longer be delayed. Governor Di.xon is no s t r n u y e r lo Ihc people of this section, and The A n n i s l o n S l u r is certain l h a l il is on safe ground in a l l c m p l inj: lo say in b e h a l f of nil Ihe people of North- easl A l a b a m a t h a i he and Ihc f i r s t Lady ot A l a b a m a are more t h a n welcome back to our h i l l s and v a l l e y s . The more o f t e n they come lo see us t h e heller we s h a l l like t h e m . WlLMA's First Anniversary A n m s i o n ' s r a d i o s t a t i o n , which wcnl on t i n : nil a year ai;o f r o m last F r i d a y w i t h a grceliius from t h e President of the U n i t e d Stales and several other notables, cclobraled il.s f i r s l b i r t h d a y Friday evonim; w i l h a series of expressions of appreciation f r o m dist i n g u i s h e d c i t i / . e n s of Ihe c o m m u n i t y who h a v e been in p o s i t i o n d u r i n t r t h e last t w e l v e m o n t h s properly to e s t i m a t e its v a l u e lo t h e c o m m u n i t y . And if we may j u d g e from the praise t h a t was bestowed on t h e M a i ion and i:s m a n a g e m e n t . Friday e v e n i n g , l h a l value has been u r e a l . The A n n i s l o n Slar is of Ihc o p i n i o n lhal I h e people of t h i s cily were very f o r t u n a t e , indeed, when Mr. J o h n S. P i t t s , general m a n a g e r of W11MA, elected lo p i t c h his lent in o u r m u l s t . By reason of ( h a t derision, we not o n l y gamed (wo e s t i m a b l e c i l i / e n s in Mr. I ' l l t s a n d I n s l a l e n l e d wife, b u t this cily also was p r i v i l e g e d lo have established here n radio s t a t i o n o! w h i c h t h i s paper believes this e n t i r e section of (he s t a t e well m i g h t feel proud. Before c o r n i n g lo Annislon. Mr. P i t l s had enjoyed e x p e r i e n c e as one of (he founders of I h e f i r s t s t a t i o n i n M o n l c o m e r y , h a d served f i v e y e a r s w i l h Ihe World Broadcaslinr. Sys- t e m and hart v i s i t e d s t a t i o n s all over the V i n i e d Stales d i n i n g t h a t t i m e . When lie do- cided to e n t e r business for h i m s e l f , t h e r e f o r e , lie knew his way about and if the progress he has m a d e in one year w i t h W 1 I M A is an earnest of w h a t hr w i l l do in the f u t u r e , t h i s city is d e s t i n e d to have one of the best radio s l a l i o n s in the U n i t e d Slates in a c i l y a n y - w h e r e near Ihe s i / e of A n n i s t o n , if, indeed, l h a l is no! already n fact. And when we spcnk of Mr. Pins, we h a v e in m i n d also his excellent s i a f f of associates. , As an agency for llu: d i s s e m i n a t i o n of news, The Annislon Slar has welcomed W11MA as a co-worker in t h i s g r e a t f i e l d of service. Wu are pleased to observe t h a i it has sought only the I j f j t and most reliable news connections; ai.d Ihere a i c occasions when the radio is i::nch f a s t e r and much more f l e x i b l e t h a n a ne«'sp;,pcr. a l t h o u g h The Star believes t h a i s l u d e n i s a n d serious m i n d e d persons w i l l a l w a y s resort to t h e printed word as con- f i r m a t i o n of w h a t they have heard over Ihe a i r . SUNDAY, NOV. 5, 1939 THE HOUSE THAT'S BUILT JACKED MERRY TBADI HARK ROUND P E G I S T E P E D I N N E W Y O R K KOSK NK\V YO)(! Nov. 4.--There Is n , m o u n i f u l m a n standing these n u t h t s al t h e tiiirs lieiilciilcil lo the larger and the lesser hti.-rary lights of the rUy, s.-uily [nqnti f u g of u-hoever will listen lo his p l a i n t : "Why didn't I t h i n k uf It first?" Tlie iiueslion is a legitimate, one. for the .son-owing lad spent weeks d i n g i n g up m i n u t i a e concerning A l e x a n d e r Woullroll [or a mami/.im.- i a r t i c l e w i l h the I n w a i t l t h o u g h t ' t l i a t the miitlci hat! been sall.sfac- j lorily cluied. · And yet today t h e most success- fill play In t o w n hns been rnn- j Jui-cil r l n h t f r o m t h e elements he . mixed In hl.s inagiirlne piece and playwrights- Moss H a r t and George S. K a n f u i i i n will reap n hnrve.st. That Ihe w r l t e i 1 should not have seen a play In ihc fabulous Wooll- cott Is. perhaps, not remarkable. iNcitlirr rlid Ihe opportunist Mc.s.srs-. Hurt, nail Kiiuliiian u n t i l they l e a d the miiKaidne piece and got lo t h i n k - ing about "Tho Man Who Crime This Is their W o o l l c o t l . a l t h o u g h t l i r y have given him the name, of Shi'iidan Whiieside. and addetl a fi:w whimsies of l i i n l r own lo the i m l u r u ] accumuliuion of whimsy t h a t is Woollrnll IllmscU. the ImpoHiint Ro.scnt Iml murder, which lie supposedly wn.s povLTltis. that lie wns made c i r n i n n t i c c t i t i c . Aiuillier story is t l s a t the editor thought his .style was \vn.sterl in the lifeless molds of the news column. I'rom drnmrUic critic, lie made Ihe easy sle[ lo oraclf, giilhcrmi; fi frnds n.5. tic rolled nloiiR. And yet it is those friends who have, coined ihi: most devuslallny descriptions of him. Ednn Ferljrr IIMT.] lo deserilx 1 him a, 5 ; "Two charHctcrs out ol Dickens." Htivpo Mnrx lie Id t h a t he wns "just n (irennier--wUh a jjowl sen?e of donblo e n t r y hookkct-pliiR, 11 !ln*-nrd I)lel?. culled him Louisa M, Woo)Icolt in pun on the girls' Ixxik nuthor. i.ouisa M. AlcoH), nnd Geoiye Jean N a t h n n descriiied him ns "tlic* Scldllt?, Powder of Times Letters Monty Woo!ey, one of 11 ic few full-hen riled tictors ott stage, play.s Woollcott niul so c u p i i n l l y t h a t his pcrformuncc hns s t n i l e d «new U:e inn/.e of leKtnda in which Woullcolt moves. You ctui't drop i n t o any lllcriiry Bathcrlng pluce willnnic h c n r i i i B the piny, or ius protnBOiii.st- di.scu.sscd, and so numerous arc the stories concerning Waolkoit t h n t one begins to wonder w h e t h e r lie ; ha.s lived one life or seven, Woollcott Is one ol the tew figure* on the liternry horizon bulky enough lo bi.spiie tlie.se .stories. His . physical npponmnco i.s M i l k i n g . ! His body Is hti^e. his forehead Is bi'tmd nnd h l ^ h . but the rest ol j liis face is smull. His, f i i r v o d noe M'l bclUTon thU'k-rJniinrri Kln.v.ps ^ivo.s him tht 1 n spec * ol a s t a r t l e d o\v]. WooIJcoti brr;i!iir n uTtier in col- IPKO und develops! there the dist i n c t i v e florid but f l u e n t .style tl:nt is iinw at iti /.eniih. He Rot n job on (he Neu- York Times R f l o r graduation, but his rrportorlal sense wn." In (he c.-vay vein. So bndly beaten was his paper on WooHcolt likes money and tnuke.s a h)i of it (over S70.00D a year), but during the .stuck market crush he l e f t FI croquet game lo hear hi.s broker's voice KoundlnH t h e doom of S2.000.GOO and cnme bnck to the unine without, b a t t i n g nn eye. lie loves to gamble nnd, some same of chance or other is always in progress in b!s n p a r t m c n t . He hisijlt.s his friends cJicrrily ,inri lcLslstcnlly. nnd his prncticul jokes hnvc g r n y e d t i l e hair o[ more t h f \ n one of them. Mrs. Gcoige S, K n u f n i n n or.ro i^ked his recommendation for n IwardlnK M'hcol for one of her children nnd Rot back a carbon ropy of his letter In whJrli he bpfj- geci t h e schoolmaster to t n k e the K i u i f i m m rhild If only lo remove her from her f a m i l y environment. Wfjolk'ott nm.s lu.s lift; on ,T RCliedute n.s inirlc.-ue as i l m t of a raihond. He resent-s broken ap- polntmcn'.-s as much as the iiiilrond does a wreck, tic tins AinaK pn- tlence when he considers himself n t f i o n t r d . Not loii^ fiRO Ina CSaire came (o his hotrl to see him ntul tvii.s au- no-.UK-ed from below. Woolcott ordered her .sent up, but the hote! c l e i k said he could not do it since Rite J'.acJ EI flag w i l h her. "Send her up, 11 snapped t h n w r i t e r , "or I'll come down. And I'm in my pajamas." Terrorized nt t h e effect this np- pmitlon l u i f i h t h n v e on n crowded liotcl lobby, the clerk sent M l f s Chiive--niul dO(;--riRht up. An Appr:il 1'nr Cbrl.slmas Gifts To The Annislon Star: Through a s t a f f of consecrated, experienced woikers. Tuskegce Ins l i t u t e conducts a year-rountl pro- yram of necessnry and imixinnul services to Southern rural families. Their most acute problem is low and, u n c e r t a i n income, When settlements are made for Ihe fall crops, there are always t h o u s a n d s of sharecropper and f u r m Inbor families who "didn't eon:c out" nnd a large majority of tins group are Negro fnmilies. , I-^rom hnrvest time until the meager ; ndvnnces nre mndc for spring plant- Ing such families face their hardest struggle Tor existence. Right, in the midst of this pc- I'Joci CJni.stnins comes nnd wlrhont -some .such service a.s Tuskegce Ins t i t u t e renders, thousands of children in these homes would have nothing to remind them of the holiday season. For m n u y years, devoted friends limv.ighout the country have used lliis i n s t i t u t i o n us a medium through which they may send gifts to blight en these homes and wnrm Ihc hearts of the children. We, therefore, renew our appeal for donations of clothing, books, toys, candy, pictures, etc. Some f r i e n d s prefer to send money with j which Eo purchase g i f t s and in such instances the donation is spent I as directed. I 1 Very truly yours, F. D. PATTERSON. i TuskcRce. A l a . President. RELIGION DAY BY DAY By WILLIAM T. ELLIS N n v y offices equipped w i t l i t t i m e - l o c k s ns spy scnre s p r e a d s | in c H p i l n l ; British .siipcr-ciircful to avoid appearance of s p r e a d i n g war p r o p a g a n d a ; Townsenditcs plan high-powered c a m p a i g n lo pledge bloc at conventions; w h e n is Thanksgiving D a y ? It d e p e n d s on politics and t u r k e y business. By P E A R S O N A N D ALLEN WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. -- How widespread is the Washington spy scare Ls indicated by the fact, t h a t every office In the Uavy's Bureau of Aeronautic^ has jus', been equipped witli a safe for protecting construction plans and other confident i a l papers. The safe.s are equipped with iJme- locks, set to open at 8:45 in - t h e morning, if an officer or draughts- man arrives before that t i m e and wants lo go to work, he's oiu of luck. The Bureau of Aeronautics is more secretive In guarding it.s bitie- prlni.s t h a n other naval offices, because one set of drawings w o u l d r e v e n i the e n t i r e design of an a i r plane. in t h e case of a battleship, a similar .=.et of drawings would reveal only a trifling portion of the whole plan. Two Thanksgivings The d a t e on which you e:U your Thank.sfitvlng dinner this year i.s :o!ng to depend largely on slate politics. New Knglnnd Li solidly against the November 23 date proclaimed by the Pre.sident. nnd will eat iw t u r k o y one week later, on November 30. The big Eastern industrial states, however, arc jusi as .solidly for tt. The South is split. The Midwest i.s a .stand-off, seven to seven, while the Far West U lined up with the President, five to three. The political complexion of this divergence i.s shown by the fact that of the 17 stales w i t h Republican Governors. 12 turned down Roosevelt's proposal; and of the 28 states with Democratic executives, went- along w i t h h i m . One state, ^lipsi.islppi, so far has taken no stand on the matter. Two others. Texas nnd Colorado, will celebrate on both days -- a great break for school kids and grocers. A possible clue to this magnanimity i.s the fact that both stale.* are big turkey producftrs and this year have record-breaking crops. British Tropaganda Lord Beaverbrook, was so careful to avoid the appearance of spreading British propaganda during his recent trip to New York that he almost dodged at the sight of his own shadow. His t r i p WR s the "antithesis of Lord Northcliffe's during the World War, when Northcliffc crossed the Atlantic wilh his IHtle black bag to start Ihe machinery of pro-British propaganda. Real reason /or Beaverbrook's trip lo tiie U n i t e d States was to obtain newsprint-, /or which British newspapers are desperately hard up. German submarines have disrupted the flow of wood pulp from Finland .and the Baltic. Beaverbrook, it happens, is Intensely unpopular with his own government, and would b e the lost man selected for propaganda purposes. Once extremely reluctant to have Britain cuter the war, his papers now have been urging Chamberlain to take a vigorous offensive, Typical headlines in his papers are: The Family Doctor By OK. M O R R I S FISHKEIM One subject lh;it comrs lip nfi.i nnti n g a m In morllonl discussion is t l m i of liciulnctic.". Apj:nn?mly nl! over t h e world people s u i t e r w l i l i headaches of wirxplc.lticd origin. Rerc-ntl.v ttin spcviat section on nervous utirt mrutnl tllsrnses of Ihc Url'Jsh Medical Association m e t to lu'nt 1 many d i f f e r e n t nhlish nu- IhorltiM I n l k svlxnit licndnehe.v A number pf valuable f n c i s everybody O H K h i lo know w e r e brouelu onl. A person's own nccoimt of his liendaclie has l l t i l e v a l u e for the ioc" tor in m a k i n g n (iln.unosis. il «-:is snUU 11 Is liniK.-vsible. moreover, for ( h e cl(;rlor lo fth*".s.s the cpurn- l i l y of Hie p n l i e n f s hemlnche. He UIU.VI Like Die ii.'iilfiii'.t word fo." llii 1 nren of pain, dnriilion of MIL? iK-lie. chiiniciei of Ihe pain nnd its i n t e n s i t y . Tlrrc niv ccri.tin liendnciios dial nn d u e lo swellings u-ltlun the brnlu and its coverings. Sonictitnes liend- nelir.s j-esnlt f i o t n an nccuimilaUon ol (lie ccrcljiObiiliml llulcl w h i c h em mines i h r m i B l ) Ihr hrain onti the splnnl cord, llcndiiclic.s w h i c h n r ; ' dull, llnob'olni; O r biir.silng. and arc n f i s v n v n l e d by rollghiliR. sloop- ing or s l r n l n h i K , ore usually n.s,so- j c i n l c d w i l h sonic tnlbmmiHlOii of ilii.s ly|w, Pain bfginninp in ihe back ol Hie head nnd r n d i n i n i K to the temples nnd from of the b r u i n may be- as, socialed u i t h i r r i l n t l o i i of the (issues which cover t h e brnin and Ihc ^nnal cord. However, (hcsc pains I'.nve also occurred in crises where the diKtor coulii not prove such rliiinpes hud occurred in the tissues concerned. If a person who lin.s iii'vcr liad heiuhiclies siKlilenly b-'Bins s'.ifferii-.g rt]x-nied a-.tacks, t h e r e is usually some d e f i n i t e change taking place in Ihe lr.i:n and may require Miigi- cnl I r e a l u i e n l . r n r l i i - i i l a r a l l e n i i o n was slven to tlie m e n t a l asiH'c.i.s of hendache.s. Il( ndnt'tu's due to soir.e ii'.eiilal Uonble. such ns a d i f f i c u l t f a m i l y ' ndjiisimenl. are nol likely to be relieved by the use ol rtruss. Most head.ichcs caused by elmiiBOs thn'. hnve t a k e n pliicc In Die lissues cnn be hfliied by pain-relieving ttri:g5. II Iho doctor can (iiid out Hie rc- · I n l f o n s h l p of the hcadaciic lo soin? ' scK-inl u i a l a c l j i s s t i n c n i . he ran prrb- nbly biini; nliout n cure by a u a c k Ins the soclnl d i f f i c u l t y w i t h o u t depending on cither drugs or an ojK'r- n l l n n What Makes A Pearl? Somebody once said that, "a [carl is a garment of patience wrapped about- A grievanrr," Kvpry pearl be- gin.s wi;h an irri'.ntlon within the ay.ilei'ji shell. There is a life lesson in this simple fact of nature. Troubles, such as everybody hns. may destroy us or onrich us. If accepted, and cn- wrapjied in resignation, they may make the commonplace life a precious contribution to the world of b e a u t y . The New Testament Is ex- ji;i:iL iii its teachings about the mission of tribulation. Consider Paul's ponrls, produced by his thorn !n the flesh. Kvcn by our Inflmiillcs anil griefs, irr wnultl briiiR forth virtues to Klorify Thee, O All-Wise Dispenser nf Iffc. Amen. Head Rotnnru S:l-ll. Copyright. "'.Vlicn is a war nol a war? . . . When It's declared." Meanwhile, the B:-lil.sh government Is following the policy of Captain I.iddell H a n . famous m i l i - lary .strategist, who advises against Uic was-.ini; of h u m a n manpower by llirowint; ihem analnst n i a c h i i i e t;uns and nrtillc-ry. Instead, he urges a slow war ol starvation ahm Germany. Note--British circles are extremely cautious about propaganda, are even canceling previously scheduled .'eetiire t o m s :o Uii.s comltiy for fear they will be tntsimc-rpreted. Even the Welsh Singeis, booked for an cxteiisi\ - e tour one year in advance, have had their t r i p canceled. \Vllliam E. Borah Who Is William E. lioiah? This question was asked of DO tirLs in a current, events test in a private school near W a s h i n g t o n . Seventeen ,ave correct answers. The other 43 save such answers as: "Leader ol a abur party in tl-.c U n i t e d S'-ntes." "Leader of the Nazi party." "President of Poland." "Head of the German Army." '-Ruler of Kgypt." The girls ranged in age from H lo IB. War Horses eign buyers of U. S. horses and mules for the warring armies nre discovering iwo things: (1) t h a i the American horse i.s a much higher bred animal t h a n d u r i n g the last war, (2) that he costs more. ·, The firsl is due largely to tlif,^ work ol the A r m y Remount Service. D i n i n g the las: war 1.033,100 American horses and 78,022 mules were told lo the Allies. Tn addition, 10.000 hor.ses and 19.000 mules went lo the A. E. P. This heavy export, had a serious efleci on the q u a l i t y of U. S. horses and after the war the Cavalry launched a long-range program to improve the breed. Through the Remount Sen-ice, sportsmen and breeders were invited to loan or pive their thoroughbred animal. 1 ; for breeding purposes. Many responded, son* contributing famous race horses. A.s a result, the Army Remount Stations at Fort noyal, Vs.. Port Reno, Okla., and Fort Robinson, Neb., have 80 ol the best, blooded horses in the country, Service is free lo anyone who wanl-s to Improve hLs stock. Since 1920 the Remount Service has bred 144,000 common work mares to thoroughbred stallions. As a Inrther inducement to fanners to Improve the breed of their liorses, the A r m y has established a Blue Book of "half breeds," the only one of ItJs kind In the world. I'oHllcal Notes Philadelphia's famed corporation lawyer, George Wharton Pepper, is making quiet political soundings for a passible senatorial comeback next ye.ir against Neiv Deal Senator Joe Guffey. Appointed to fill a vacancy In the Senate, Pepper later vas defeated by Boss William Vare in a sensational big-money campaign t h a t later caused Vare to be denied his scat. . . . Governor Ralph Can- of Colorado may be a big shot in his slate, but a press conference staged tor him in Washington by the Republican National C o m m i t tee proved a sad flop. Only three reporters tor Colorado papers turned up. . . . Although he has belabored tl'.o Roosevelt regime from A to Z, Senator Hiram Johnson had no hesitancy in asking a Job for his one-time Republican colleague, ex- Senator Sam Shortridgc. New Denl-jt ers have taken care of Sborlrtrige,v (Please t u r n lo page 9.) Census And Drouth Weapons WASHINGTON, Nov. 4. -- The fine oratory let loose during debate over the neutrality bill probably helped the administration to get, its measure approved. Bui it- always helps to have a little straight, old-fashioned political pressure too. and when the measure got to the House of Representatives t h a t pressure was not lacking. Two things proved especially useful as sources of pressure: the 1940 census and the 1933 drouth. SO THEY SAY Democracy and co.ua! opportunity must remain our goal. The fortunes of such ft way of life for a long f u t u r e are bound tip w i t h the success ol popular government on this continent.--Clarence A. Dykstra. president, University ol Wisconsin. Once '.he authority of God is denied, then civil a u t h o r i t y tends to assume absolute autonomy, which belqng exclusively to the Supreme Maker.-Pope Phis XII, In his first encyclical. Under the stimulus of the European w a r , hand-to-mouth business conditions have practically disappeared,--Former Governor Alfred M. Lancion ol Kansas. address- Ing students and guests at Cornell College. Mount. Vcrnon, la. We have no ambitions for t e r r i - torial expansion. Neither had w? any pan in the happenings t h a t brought about the conflict today dividing EnroiK.--King Leopold III of Belgium, In broadcast to 11. S. First, the census. The headquarters s t a f f here In Washington, under whose direction the census wilt be taken, is tinder civil service and there Is no patronage to be had. But the temporary s t a f f , tinder which Die field work will be done. Is not under civil service. It will consist ol approximately I30.0CO people, An administration which Ls about lo hand out 130,000 new jobs--even if t h e y are only temporary--can apply plenty ol pressure to a Con- grcsMiian who lias to keep one eye on his political debts back home. For thp census, the nation has been divided into 103 areas which are f u r t h e r subdivided into n loin] of 560 districts. The district supervisors will choose, the 130,000 enumerators; o,nd dining Ihe last couple of woeJcs it has been made clear t h a t a Congressman who refused to go along with the administration on the n e u t r a l i t y matter s-as going to have « hard time exercising any voice in that selection. O: lop of l h a t . there u-ns the drouih. A short time ago a n u m - ber ol Congressmen and Senators formed an unofficial committee to sccic Immediate sclton for drouth relief. Tlie sum ol $50,000.000 was mentioned as being Ihe least that would meet the situation, and it n-ns agreed t h a t the S50.000.000 had lo be forthcoming pretty speedily. Since then the . .mlnlslrMlon has done a neat Job of finding money where none apparently ex- Islcd. First of all, it »as discovered that something like $12.000,000 was available a't the* Farm Security Administration. At the beginning of ( h i s fiscal year, FSA earmarked $18,000,000 for granis-in-nid to distressed farmers; approximately two-thirds of this money remained unspent, as the big call for such grants conie.s around the Jirst of the year. It was decided that this money could be used for drouth relief fm- / mediately, and that a deficiency 9 appropriation could be had in J a n - *~ uary. Next, it was recalled t h a t the Budget Uureau had 59.000,000 In FSA money which was being held in reserve and which, under the President's economy proclamation, was to be turned back to the treasury unless some emergency arose. The drouth situation was officially dubbed an emergency, and the $9,000,000 thus became available. Then it was found that tlje Disaster Loan Corporation had $20,000,000 on hand. This corporation Ls a subsidiary of the RFC. and hence it can't make Its funds directly available to the FSA people. Conferences are now imrler way, however, to work out some system whereby this money can be used In the drouih area, and It i.s expected that some arrnngenie.-it will be deciried on in a few clays. Lastly, the Federal Surplus Com- modiiies Corporation wns able to make food grants for tlie most urgent cases. Now bj^ "finding" this money to meet the'crlsis. the administration wns able to do two things: . First, It wns able to stave off the rising demand lhat Congress remain In session lo appropriate money for drouth relief, and, second, It was able to swing several votes for the neutrality bill by\ agreeing to lake care of stiffeiing/B constituents promptly. In moving lo erase the 41-vole majority which last spring wrote an embargo into the Bloom bill, those tv.'o maneuvers were of apparently decisive Importance.